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Re: suisse absinthe verte recipe and distillation instructions

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  • waljaco
    I was under the impression that the French term anise vert (green anise) referred to the Mediterranean herb and to differentiate it from anise etoile (star
    Message 1 of 15 , Dec 1, 2005
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      I was under the impression that the French term 'anise vert' (green
      anise) referred to the Mediterranean herb and to differentiate it from
      'anise etoile' (star anise)(also named 'badiane') which comes from
      the Chinese tree.
      wal
      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, jim mcdonald <multiflorum@g...>
      wrote:
      >
      > > In absinthe distillation the herbs are left in the charge of the
      > > still, that is why you use a double boiler, cordial still, so your
      > > herbs never come in contact with direct heat.
      >
      > curious why that would be. I'm an herbalist, and know a quite a bit
      > about the particulars of extraction and solvency of various herb's
      > constituents. All of the volatiles from the herbs infused in the
      > alcohol are rather quickly extracted. Leaving the marc in the
      > tincture while its being distilled will result in the extraction of
      > different compounds (due to the heating), and the breakdown of some of
      > the compounds (also due to the heat)... it's kind've like a soxhlet
      > extraction, but the volatiles are being seperated from the rest of the
      > extraction, and the other compounds will not distill over into your
      > final product.
      >
      > Do you know that there's a reason for this other than "that was what
      > they used to do?" I'd be interested.
      >
      > Also, of note: the bright green color of traditional absinthe comes
      > from using some fresh (as in "not dried") herbs durnig the coloring.
      > When old recipes call for, "green anise", for example, that's not a
      > kind of anise, that's a reference to it being fresh. In fresh plants,
      > the chlorophyl is extracted almost immediately in an alcoholic
      > menstrum.
      >
      > This is of note, as well, because an ounce of green anise is not the
      > same quantity as an ounce of dried anise.
      > --
      > jim
      >
    • waljaco
      Sorry, anis vert et anis étoilé wal
      Message 2 of 15 , Dec 1, 2005
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        Sorry,
        anis vert'' et anis étoilé'

        wal
        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
        >
        > I was under the impression that the French term 'anise vert' (green
        > anise) referred to the Mediterranean herb and to differentiate it from
        > 'anise etoile' (star anise)(also named 'badiane') which comes from
        > the Chinese tree.
        > wal
        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, jim mcdonald <multiflorum@g...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > > In absinthe distillation the herbs are left in the charge of the
        > > > still, that is why you use a double boiler, cordial still, so your
        > > > herbs never come in contact with direct heat.
        > >
        > > curious why that would be. I'm an herbalist, and know a quite a bit
        > > about the particulars of extraction and solvency of various herb's
        > > constituents. All of the volatiles from the herbs infused in the
        > > alcohol are rather quickly extracted. Leaving the marc in the
        > > tincture while its being distilled will result in the extraction of
        > > different compounds (due to the heating), and the breakdown of some of
        > > the compounds (also due to the heat)... it's kind've like a soxhlet
        > > extraction, but the volatiles are being seperated from the rest of the
        > > extraction, and the other compounds will not distill over into your
        > > final product.
        > >
        > > Do you know that there's a reason for this other than "that was what
        > > they used to do?" I'd be interested.
        > >
        > > Also, of note: the bright green color of traditional absinthe comes
        > > from using some fresh (as in "not dried") herbs durnig the coloring.
        > > When old recipes call for, "green anise", for example, that's not a
        > > kind of anise, that's a reference to it being fresh. In fresh plants,
        > > the chlorophyl is extracted almost immediately in an alcoholic
        > > menstrum.
        > >
        > > This is of note, as well, because an ounce of green anise is not the
        > > same quantity as an ounce of dried anise.
        > > --
        > > jim
        > >
        >
      • jim mcdonald
        ... well, you re right, they do; but it could just as easily have been said anise and satr anise; that would have been clear enough for that time period. If
        Message 3 of 15 , Dec 1, 2005
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          > I was under the impression that the French term 'anise vert' (green
          > anise) referred to the Mediterranean herb and to differentiate it from
          > 'anise etoile' (star anise)(also named 'badiane') which comes from
          > the Chinese tree.

          well, you're right, they do; but it could just as easily have been
          said anise and satr anise; that would have been clear enough for that
          time period. If you look through herbals form that time period,
          though, you'll find that "green" used before the name of an herb
          indicated it would be used fresh. Even today, say, with firewood, if
          you peel the bark on a peice and see that it hasn't dried out, you say
          its "green wood" or "this wood is still green".

          Now, there is a chance I could be wrong, but it would be odd to use
          that word differently, considering the common usage at that time.

          The le fee verte site (http://www.feeverte.net/recipes.html) has
          several historical recipes, and you'll note several call for either
          "green wormwood", "green fennel" or both.

          one of the recipes states:

          "All these ingredients being as finely divided as possible, that is to
          say, cut, chopped, or crushed; one places them into a double boiler
          along with the previously distilled product, or better yet into an
          apparatus called a colorator, of galvanized copper, heated by hot
          water circulation or by steam, and one heats everything to just around
          50 degrees centigrade. Under the influence of this temperature, the
          plants yield to the liqueur their main natural coloring, chlorophyll,
          and their fragrance."

          and another:

          "Put the ingredients in the liquor which has been distilled, and allow
          the whole to remain ~until the desired color is obtained~; then draw
          it off into another cask and reduce the alcoholic strength to 120
          proof, or in other words, 60 percent, and it is ready for bottling."

          This second reference, where it says, "until the desired color is
          obtained" would seem to me to be indicating that there isn't a set
          time period to steep the colorants, but rather, you do it till the
          color is where you want it. This is because while the cholorphyl is
          rather quickly extracted, other components are more gardually done,
          and wile most all green plant tinctures initially turn a vibrant green
          shade, as other compounds are extracted they darken.

          You'll also notice that not all of these recipes call for "green"
          herbs during coloration, and some specifically cite "dried". What I
          know is that in the hundreds of tinctures I've made over the years
          I've ~never~ seen bright green come out of a dried plant.

          Though, to keep things in perspective, the absinthe I had that was
          made by dale pendell was exquisite and not bright green at all. And I
          had a bright green one once that was dreadful.
          --
          jim
        • waljaco
          You are referring to English usage of the term green when meaning fresh not dried. In this case the French use it to differentiate 2 dried seeds and pods - one
          Message 4 of 15 , Dec 2, 2005
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            You are referring to English usage of the term green when meaning
            fresh not dried. In this case the French use it to differentiate 2
            dried seeds and pods - one from a plant and one from a tree.
            wal
            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, jim mcdonald <multiflorum@g...>
            wrote:
            >
            > > I was under the impression that the French term 'anise vert' (green
            > > anise) referred to the Mediterranean herb and to differentiate it from
            > > 'anise etoile' (star anise)(also named 'badiane') which comes from
            > > the Chinese tree.
            >
            > well, you're right, they do; but it could just as easily have been
            > said anise and satr anise; that would have been clear enough for that
            > time period. If you look through herbals form that time period,
            > though, you'll find that "green" used before the name of an herb
            > indicated it would be used fresh. Even today, say, with firewood, if
            > you peel the bark on a peice and see that it hasn't dried out, you say
            > its "green wood" or "this wood is still green".
            >
            > Now, there is a chance I could be wrong, but it would be odd to use
            > that word differently, considering the common usage at that time.
            >
            > The le fee verte site (http://www.feeverte.net/recipes.html) has
            > several historical recipes, and you'll note several call for either
            > "green wormwood", "green fennel" or both.
            >
            > one of the recipes states:
            >
            > "All these ingredients being as finely divided as possible, that is to
            > say, cut, chopped, or crushed; one places them into a double boiler
            > along with the previously distilled product, or better yet into an
            > apparatus called a colorator, of galvanized copper, heated by hot
            > water circulation or by steam, and one heats everything to just around
            > 50 degrees centigrade. Under the influence of this temperature, the
            > plants yield to the liqueur their main natural coloring, chlorophyll,
            > and their fragrance."
            >
            > and another:
            >
            > "Put the ingredients in the liquor which has been distilled, and allow
            > the whole to remain ~until the desired color is obtained~; then draw
            > it off into another cask and reduce the alcoholic strength to 120
            > proof, or in other words, 60 percent, and it is ready for bottling."
            >
            > This second reference, where it says, "until the desired color is
            > obtained" would seem to me to be indicating that there isn't a set
            > time period to steep the colorants, but rather, you do it till the
            > color is where you want it. This is because while the cholorphyl is
            > rather quickly extracted, other components are more gardually done,
            > and wile most all green plant tinctures initially turn a vibrant green
            > shade, as other compounds are extracted they darken.
            >
            > You'll also notice that not all of these recipes call for "green"
            > herbs during coloration, and some specifically cite "dried". What I
            > know is that in the hundreds of tinctures I've made over the years
            > I've ~never~ seen bright green come out of a dried plant.
            >
            > Though, to keep things in perspective, the absinthe I had that was
            > made by dale pendell was exquisite and not bright green at all. And I
            > had a bright green one once that was dreadful.
            > --
            > jim
            >
          • MB
            ... this ... to ... Petit ... on ... to ... in ... 68% ... you ... got ... mill ... part ... four ... in ... crockery ... and ... clear ... milky. ... back ...
            Message 5 of 15 , Dec 6, 2005
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              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "cartierusm2004"
              <htcustom@h...> wrote:
              >
              > Not bad but a little incorrect. First off as an absinthe-tuer for
              > many many years I am about to embark upon making my first batch
              this
              > week. The site Feeverte.com is excellent but does not have a link
              to
              > cascade supply only an email and they no longer carry petit
              > wormwood, nor does anyone else. I have not yet aquired it but plan
              > on growing this coming year. If anyone else knows where to get
              Petit
              > (Roman) wormwood as a dried herb please let me and everyone else
              on
              > this forum know. I plan on making my absinthe and letting it be
              > until I can grow or find some Roman Wormwood. Secondly Florence
              > Fennel is Foeniculum dulce not the one mentioned in this article.
              > Good Luck to all. Also you should be using an indirect heat source
              > so as to not burn or scorch the herbs in the boiler, most common
              > place is using a double boiler.
              >
              >
              > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "trich_peru"
              > <trich_peru@y...> wrote:
              > >
              > > I was e-mailed by a fellow member concerning how to create a pre-
              > ban
              > > absinthe, so here it is:
              > >
              > > First of all I only have two batch stills. Ones made of
              > borosilicate
              > > glass with a one liter capacity in the receiver. The other is a
              > > portuguese alembic with a 2.75 capacity. Both will create fine
              > > absinthes. I like the borosilicate glass, because I can see
              > > everything thats going on. Make sure in any still you use, that
              > you
              > > have a thermometer mounted in the still head to record vapour
              > > temperatures.
              > >
              > > The first step I take is to make grape spirits. Get about two
              > liters
              > > 40 proof moderately priced brandy. With my stills I can get it
              to
              > 85%
              > > with two distillations. This step is important because the
              > essential
              > > oils we want to incorporate with the maceration will not infuse
              in
              > > the alcohol with a percentage lower than 75%. Also were going to
              > add
              > > about 500ml distilled water to the charge in the still during
              > > distillation, so after distillation you should be right about
              68%
              > or
              > > higher, what pre-ban absinthe was marketed as.
              > >
              > > Resources for herbs are many, however I recommend the freshest
              you
              > > can get, which would be richters.com. However the elusive
              > Artemisia
              > > pontica[Roman wormwood] in its cut and sifted form can only be
              got
              > by
              > > one source that I know of which is cascade herbal supply, the
              > website
              > > for this is feeverte.com, under brewing resources.
              > >
              > > Here is a recipe for one liter of suisse verte absinthe, you can
              > do
              > > the math for other volumes. All herbs are grinded in a coffee
              mill
              > to
              > > create more surface are for the alcohol to work on.
              > >
              > > Artemisia absinthium, wormwood foliage and flowers, 25 to 30g
              > > Pimpinella anisum, anise seed 45 to 50g
              > > Foeniculum vulgare azoricum, florence fennel seed, 45 to 50g
              > >
              > > These herbs are for the first maceration and subsequent
              > distillation.
              > >
              > > The herbs for the coloring or what makes it a verte absinthe are
              > as
              > > follows.
              > >
              > > Artemisia pontica, roman wormwood foliage and flowers, 10g
              > > Hyssopus officinalis, hyssop foliage, 10g
              > > Melissa officinalis, lemon balm foliage, 5g
              > >
              > > For this recipe were going to use 75cl of our 85% grape spirits,
              > put
              > > the grape spirits and your ground herbs for the distillation
              part
              > in
              > > your still or mother flask. Let macerate for twelve to twenty
              four
              > > hours. Twelve hours is better. Leave the herbs in your mother
              > flask,
              > > or still during the distillation. If your still bumps, putting
              in
              > a
              > > couple of boiling stones or a couple of pieces of broken
              crockery
              > > will help immensely, also add about 500ml of distilled water,
              and
              > set
              > > on your heat source. Water on in the condenser at 60c, distill
              > until
              > > you reach about 82c, and change the receiver. A couple of
              > different
              > > receivers during the process is advisable. Keep dumping the
              clear
              > > runnings in you first receiver, around the mid 90s in C, your
              > going
              > > to notice the stream slowing down, be watchful for the faints
              > around
              > > now, which you will know when the distillate starts turning
              milky.
              > > Stop the distillation here, and avoid the faints mixing with the
              > > clear runnings. Let the distillate cool some what and grind your
              > > coloring herbs. Add the herbs to your clear runnings, and put
              back
              > on
              > > your heat source. You want to heat your coloring herbs, but
              never
              > to
              > > the boiling point, when you can no longer hold your hand to the
              > head
              > > of the still take it off and let cool, filter, and bottle.
              > >
              > > This absinthe is still raw but drinkable, it should taste like
              > > medicine. Let it age for a couple of weeks to a month. Its
              > definetley
              > > an aquired taste. After a month or so its ready for drinking,
              and
              > > should be diluted with water at a 1 to 4 ratio with a cube or
              two
              > of
              > > sugar. It should turn cloudy greenish white upon addition of
              > water,
              > > and have a very distinctive nose and mouthfeel. Keep in a green
              or
              > > colored bottle or else the chlorophyll will oxidize out. Hope
              this
              > > helps.
              > >
              > > Trich
              > >
              >
              No, Florence fennel is NOT the "dulce" (dulce is the sweet fennel)
              variety, it is indeed the "azoricum" variety as first stated by
              Trich.
            • cartierusm2004
              Hmm well if I m wrong I appologize but I got the Florence of Fennel name from Botanical.com http://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/f/fenflo03.html ... for ...
              Message 6 of 15 , Dec 6, 2005
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                Hmm well if I'm wrong I appologize but I got the Florence of Fennel
                name from Botanical.com

                http://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/f/fenflo03.html


                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "MB" <cascadeherbs@y...>
                wrote:
                >
                > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "cartierusm2004"
                > <htcustom@h...> wrote:
                > >
                > > Not bad but a little incorrect. First off as an absinthe-tuer
                for
                > > many many years I am about to embark upon making my first batch
                > this
                > > week. The site Feeverte.com is excellent but does not have a
                link
                > to
                > > cascade supply only an email and they no longer carry petit
                > > wormwood, nor does anyone else. I have not yet aquired it but
                plan
                > > on growing this coming year. If anyone else knows where to get
                > Petit
                > > (Roman) wormwood as a dried herb please let me and everyone else
                > on
                > > this forum know. I plan on making my absinthe and letting it be
                > > until I can grow or find some Roman Wormwood. Secondly Florence
                > > Fennel is Foeniculum dulce not the one mentioned in this
                article.
                > > Good Luck to all. Also you should be using an indirect heat
                source
                > > so as to not burn or scorch the herbs in the boiler, most common
                > > place is using a double boiler.
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "trich_peru"
                > > <trich_peru@y...> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > I was e-mailed by a fellow member concerning how to create a
                pre-
                > > ban
                > > > absinthe, so here it is:
                > > >
                > > > First of all I only have two batch stills. Ones made of
                > > borosilicate
                > > > glass with a one liter capacity in the receiver. The other is
                a
                > > > portuguese alembic with a 2.75 capacity. Both will create fine
                > > > absinthes. I like the borosilicate glass, because I can see
                > > > everything thats going on. Make sure in any still you use,
                that
                > > you
                > > > have a thermometer mounted in the still head to record vapour
                > > > temperatures.
                > > >
                > > > The first step I take is to make grape spirits. Get about two
                > > liters
                > > > 40 proof moderately priced brandy. With my stills I can get it
                > to
                > > 85%
                > > > with two distillations. This step is important because the
                > > essential
                > > > oils we want to incorporate with the maceration will not
                infuse
                > in
                > > > the alcohol with a percentage lower than 75%. Also were going
                to
                > > add
                > > > about 500ml distilled water to the charge in the still during
                > > > distillation, so after distillation you should be right about
                > 68%
                > > or
                > > > higher, what pre-ban absinthe was marketed as.
                > > >
                > > > Resources for herbs are many, however I recommend the freshest
                > you
                > > > can get, which would be richters.com. However the elusive
                > > Artemisia
                > > > pontica[Roman wormwood] in its cut and sifted form can only be
                > got
                > > by
                > > > one source that I know of which is cascade herbal supply, the
                > > website
                > > > for this is feeverte.com, under brewing resources.
                > > >
                > > > Here is a recipe for one liter of suisse verte absinthe, you
                can
                > > do
                > > > the math for other volumes. All herbs are grinded in a coffee
                > mill
                > > to
                > > > create more surface are for the alcohol to work on.
                > > >
                > > > Artemisia absinthium, wormwood foliage and flowers, 25 to 30g
                > > > Pimpinella anisum, anise seed 45 to 50g
                > > > Foeniculum vulgare azoricum, florence fennel seed, 45 to 50g
                > > >
                > > > These herbs are for the first maceration and subsequent
                > > distillation.
                > > >
                > > > The herbs for the coloring or what makes it a verte absinthe
                are
                > > as
                > > > follows.
                > > >
                > > > Artemisia pontica, roman wormwood foliage and flowers, 10g
                > > > Hyssopus officinalis, hyssop foliage, 10g
                > > > Melissa officinalis, lemon balm foliage, 5g
                > > >
                > > > For this recipe were going to use 75cl of our 85% grape
                spirits,
                > > put
                > > > the grape spirits and your ground herbs for the distillation
                > part
                > > in
                > > > your still or mother flask. Let macerate for twelve to twenty
                > four
                > > > hours. Twelve hours is better. Leave the herbs in your mother
                > > flask,
                > > > or still during the distillation. If your still bumps, putting
                > in
                > > a
                > > > couple of boiling stones or a couple of pieces of broken
                > crockery
                > > > will help immensely, also add about 500ml of distilled water,
                > and
                > > set
                > > > on your heat source. Water on in the condenser at 60c, distill
                > > until
                > > > you reach about 82c, and change the receiver. A couple of
                > > different
                > > > receivers during the process is advisable. Keep dumping the
                > clear
                > > > runnings in you first receiver, around the mid 90s in C, your
                > > going
                > > > to notice the stream slowing down, be watchful for the faints
                > > around
                > > > now, which you will know when the distillate starts turning
                > milky.
                > > > Stop the distillation here, and avoid the faints mixing with
                the
                > > > clear runnings. Let the distillate cool some what and grind
                your
                > > > coloring herbs. Add the herbs to your clear runnings, and put
                > back
                > > on
                > > > your heat source. You want to heat your coloring herbs, but
                > never
                > > to
                > > > the boiling point, when you can no longer hold your hand to
                the
                > > head
                > > > of the still take it off and let cool, filter, and bottle.
                > > >
                > > > This absinthe is still raw but drinkable, it should taste like
                > > > medicine. Let it age for a couple of weeks to a month. Its
                > > definetley
                > > > an aquired taste. After a month or so its ready for drinking,
                > and
                > > > should be diluted with water at a 1 to 4 ratio with a cube or
                > two
                > > of
                > > > sugar. It should turn cloudy greenish white upon addition of
                > > water,
                > > > and have a very distinctive nose and mouthfeel. Keep in a
                green
                > or
                > > > colored bottle or else the chlorophyll will oxidize out. Hope
                > this
                > > > helps.
                > > >
                > > > Trich
                > > >
                > >
                > No, Florence fennel is NOT the "dulce" (dulce is the sweet fennel)
                > variety, it is indeed the "azoricum" variety as first stated by
                > Trich.
                >
              • waljaco
                Florence fennel is normally grown for its eadable bulbs not seeds. The sources usually mention just fennel - Florence fennel I have seen mentioned only once.
                Message 7 of 15 , Dec 7, 2005
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                  Florence fennel is normally grown for its eadable bulbs not seeds. The
                  sources usually mention just 'fennel' - Florence fennel I have seen
                  mentioned only once.

                  wal
                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "cartierusm2004"
                  <htcustom@h...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hmm well if I'm wrong I appologize but I got the Florence of Fennel
                  > name from Botanical.com
                  >
                  > http://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/f/fenflo03.html
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "MB" <cascadeherbs@y...>
                  > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "cartierusm2004"
                  > > <htcustom@h...> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Not bad but a little incorrect. First off as an absinthe-tuer
                  > for
                  > > > many many years I am about to embark upon making my first batch
                  > > this
                  > > > week. The site Feeverte.com is excellent but does not have a
                  > link
                  > > to
                  > > > cascade supply only an email and they no longer carry petit
                  > > > wormwood, nor does anyone else. I have not yet aquired it but
                  > plan
                  > > > on growing this coming year. If anyone else knows where to get
                  > > Petit
                  > > > (Roman) wormwood as a dried herb please let me and everyone else
                  > > on
                  > > > this forum know. I plan on making my absinthe and letting it be
                  > > > until I can grow or find some Roman Wormwood. Secondly Florence
                  > > > Fennel is Foeniculum dulce not the one mentioned in this
                  > article.
                  > > > Good Luck to all. Also you should be using an indirect heat
                  > source
                  > > > so as to not burn or scorch the herbs in the boiler, most common
                  > > > place is using a double boiler.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "trich_peru"
                  > > > <trich_peru@y...> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I was e-mailed by a fellow member concerning how to create a
                  > pre-
                  > > > ban
                  > > > > absinthe, so here it is:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > First of all I only have two batch stills. Ones made of
                  > > > borosilicate
                  > > > > glass with a one liter capacity in the receiver. The other is
                  > a
                  > > > > portuguese alembic with a 2.75 capacity. Both will create fine
                  > > > > absinthes. I like the borosilicate glass, because I can see
                  > > > > everything thats going on. Make sure in any still you use,
                  > that
                  > > > you
                  > > > > have a thermometer mounted in the still head to record vapour
                  > > > > temperatures.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > The first step I take is to make grape spirits. Get about two
                  > > > liters
                  > > > > 40 proof moderately priced brandy. With my stills I can get it
                  > > to
                  > > > 85%
                  > > > > with two distillations. This step is important because the
                  > > > essential
                  > > > > oils we want to incorporate with the maceration will not
                  > infuse
                  > > in
                  > > > > the alcohol with a percentage lower than 75%. Also were going
                  > to
                  > > > add
                  > > > > about 500ml distilled water to the charge in the still during
                  > > > > distillation, so after distillation you should be right about
                  > > 68%
                  > > > or
                  > > > > higher, what pre-ban absinthe was marketed as.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Resources for herbs are many, however I recommend the freshest
                  > > you
                  > > > > can get, which would be richters.com. However the elusive
                  > > > Artemisia
                  > > > > pontica[Roman wormwood] in its cut and sifted form can only be
                  > > got
                  > > > by
                  > > > > one source that I know of which is cascade herbal supply, the
                  > > > website
                  > > > > for this is feeverte.com, under brewing resources.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Here is a recipe for one liter of suisse verte absinthe, you
                  > can
                  > > > do
                  > > > > the math for other volumes. All herbs are grinded in a coffee
                  > > mill
                  > > > to
                  > > > > create more surface are for the alcohol to work on.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Artemisia absinthium, wormwood foliage and flowers, 25 to 30g
                  > > > > Pimpinella anisum, anise seed 45 to 50g
                  > > > > Foeniculum vulgare azoricum, florence fennel seed, 45 to 50g
                  > > > >
                  > > > > These herbs are for the first maceration and subsequent
                  > > > distillation.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > The herbs for the coloring or what makes it a verte absinthe
                  > are
                  > > > as
                  > > > > follows.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Artemisia pontica, roman wormwood foliage and flowers, 10g
                  > > > > Hyssopus officinalis, hyssop foliage, 10g
                  > > > > Melissa officinalis, lemon balm foliage, 5g
                  > > > >
                  > > > > For this recipe were going to use 75cl of our 85% grape
                  > spirits,
                  > > > put
                  > > > > the grape spirits and your ground herbs for the distillation
                  > > part
                  > > > in
                  > > > > your still or mother flask. Let macerate for twelve to twenty
                  > > four
                  > > > > hours. Twelve hours is better. Leave the herbs in your mother
                  > > > flask,
                  > > > > or still during the distillation. If your still bumps, putting
                  > > in
                  > > > a
                  > > > > couple of boiling stones or a couple of pieces of broken
                  > > crockery
                  > > > > will help immensely, also add about 500ml of distilled water,
                  > > and
                  > > > set
                  > > > > on your heat source. Water on in the condenser at 60c, distill
                  > > > until
                  > > > > you reach about 82c, and change the receiver. A couple of
                  > > > different
                  > > > > receivers during the process is advisable. Keep dumping the
                  > > clear
                  > > > > runnings in you first receiver, around the mid 90s in C, your
                  > > > going
                  > > > > to notice the stream slowing down, be watchful for the faints
                  > > > around
                  > > > > now, which you will know when the distillate starts turning
                  > > milky.
                  > > > > Stop the distillation here, and avoid the faints mixing with
                  > the
                  > > > > clear runnings. Let the distillate cool some what and grind
                  > your
                  > > > > coloring herbs. Add the herbs to your clear runnings, and put
                  > > back
                  > > > on
                  > > > > your heat source. You want to heat your coloring herbs, but
                  > > never
                  > > > to
                  > > > > the boiling point, when you can no longer hold your hand to
                  > the
                  > > > head
                  > > > > of the still take it off and let cool, filter, and bottle.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > This absinthe is still raw but drinkable, it should taste like
                  > > > > medicine. Let it age for a couple of weeks to a month. Its
                  > > > definetley
                  > > > > an aquired taste. After a month or so its ready for drinking,
                  > > and
                  > > > > should be diluted with water at a 1 to 4 ratio with a cube or
                  > > two
                  > > > of
                  > > > > sugar. It should turn cloudy greenish white upon addition of
                  > > > water,
                  > > > > and have a very distinctive nose and mouthfeel. Keep in a
                  > green
                  > > or
                  > > > > colored bottle or else the chlorophyll will oxidize out. Hope
                  > > this
                  > > > > helps.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Trich
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > > No, Florence fennel is NOT the "dulce" (dulce is the sweet fennel)
                  > > variety, it is indeed the "azoricum" variety as first stated by
                  > > Trich.
                  > >
                  >
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