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Re: [new_distillers] ? stuck wash

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  • G&N
    It should go down a lot further yet just be patient and wait another 2 to 3 days as the fermention does slowdown considerably in the last few days....when it
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 2, 2001
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      It should go down a lot further yet just be patient and wait another 2 to 3 days as the fermention does slowdown considerably in the last few days....when it gets to about 5 bubbles a second it will not fall anymore but give it a few days for the yeast to settle.
       
      Glenn
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Robert N
      Sent: Sunday, December 02, 2001 2:18 PM
      Subject: [new_distillers] ? stuck wash

      Hi all, I laid down a wash 8 days ago, using 9kg’s castor sugar, 25Lt’s water, and 1 packet turbo extra (Still Spirits). The air temperature has been between 17oC to 32oC, which makes for fantastic drinking weather, but I digress. I realise that this is at the extreme upper range for the turbo extra but is was 5oC cooler when I made the wash.  The thing is the wash is still bubbling away. It has slowed down quite a lot from the first 3 days. I just took a hydrometer reading and it was 1015, the alcometer was above the zero mark @32oC, even allowing for temperature variation these readings seems to me to be too high. Is it because of the high ambient temperature or is it because of something else? Is there anything I can do to remedy the problem with this wash? Your thoughts?

       

      Have a great day!

       

      Robert

       



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    • John Vandermeulen
      Stuck wash?!! I would say that if your wash is still bubbling, it is still fermenting, albeit perhaps slowly with respect to other runs you may have made. I
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 2, 2001
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        Stuck wash?!!  I would say that if your wash is still bubbling, it is still fermenting, albeit perhaps slowly with respect to other runs you may have made.  I call "stuck" literally that - it will NOT ferment - that's 'stuck'.   At this moment I have about 5L of apple cider (the last of 60L) sitting inactive, stuck, despite three attempts to get it going, with new rehydrated yeast each time.  Today I will have another go by pouring it over into another clean container, new yeast, new yeast nutrient.
        John V

        Robert N wrote:

         
        Hi all, I laid down a wash 8 days ago, using 9kg’s castor sugar, 25Lt’s water, and 1 packet turbo extra (Still Spirits). The air temperature has been between 17oC to 32oC, which makes for fantastic drinking weather, but I digress. I realise that this is at the extreme upper range for the turbo extra but is was 5oC cooler when I made the wash.  The thing is the wash is still bubbling away. It has slowed down quite a lot from the first 3 days. I just took a hydrometer reading and it was 1015, the alcometer was above the zero mark @32oC, even allowing for temperature variation these readings seems to me to be too high. Is it because of the high ambient temperature or is it because of something else? Is there anything I can do to remedy the problem with this wash? Your thoughts?

         

        Have a great day!

         

        Robert

         


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      • charles55me@yahoo.com
        Robert, A few points to make: 9Kgs of Caster Sugar, which is powdered sugar in 25L wash is going to make the yeast work/struggle.8Kgs is the recommended sugar
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 3, 2001
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          Robert,

          A few points to make:

          9Kgs of Caster Sugar, which is powdered sugar in 25L wash is going to
          make the yeast work/struggle.8Kgs is the recommended sugar amount.
          Dextrose is 9Kgs.
          The turbo extra fires up inside 24hrs with powerful airlock activity
          for 3-4 days. Then slowly down for the net 2-3 days. This varies
          though, such as proper aeration, wash temp, this should be kept at
          25c or less. Yours with an ambient of up to 32c coupled with the rise
          in wash temperature could have left the yeast struggling again or it
          could kill off large amounts of yeast.
          An alcometer is only used for ethenol & water. At gravity of 1015 the
          wash is has significant sugars etc. Your reading doesn't help in my
          humble opinion.Use an alcometer at the distilling stage only.
          Hope this helps

          Graeme


          -- In new_distillers@y..., "Robert N" <dinks_c@y...> wrote:
          > Hi all, I laid down a wash 8 days ago, using 9kg's castor sugar,
          25Lt's
          > water, and 1 packet turbo extra (Still Spirits). The air
          temperature has
          > been between 17oC to 32oC, which makes for fantastic drinking
          weather, but I
          > digress. I realise that this is at the extreme upper range for the
          turbo
          > extra but is was 5oC cooler when I made the wash. The thing is the
          wash is
          > still bubbling away. It has slowed down quite a lot from the first
          3 days. I
          > just took a hydrometer reading and it was 1015, the alcometer was
          above the
          > zero mark @32oC, even allowing for temperature variation these
          readings
          > seems to me to be too high. Is it because of the high ambient
          temperature or
          > is it because of something else? Is there anything I can do to
          remedy the
          > problem with this wash? Your thoughts?
          >
          > Have a great day!
          >
          > Robert
        • John Vandermeulen
          I am confused overf the terms S.G.meter, hydrometer and alcometer. Are these all the same thing, or are some different? I have a floating device with a paper
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 4, 2001
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            I am confused overf the terms S.G.meter, hydrometer and alcometer. Are these
            all the same thing, or are some different?
            I have a floating device with a paper scale inside it, with 4 scales - 2
            sugars, 1 S.G., and an alcohol scale. I assume that the S.G.scale is the
            principal one, with the others mere calculations from it. Which is it -
            hydrometer, S.G. scale, alcometer?
            JohnV

            charles55me@... wrote:

            > Robert,
            >
            > A few points to make:
            >
            > 9Kgs of Caster Sugar, which is powdered sugar in 25L wash is going to
            > make the yeast work/struggle.8Kgs is the recommended sugar amount.
            > Dextrose is 9Kgs.
            > The turbo extra fires up inside 24hrs with powerful airlock activity
            > for 3-4 days. Then slowly down for the net 2-3 days. This varies
            > though, such as proper aeration, wash temp, this should be kept at
            > 25c or less. Yours with an ambient of up to 32c coupled with the rise
            > in wash temperature could have left the yeast struggling again or it
            > could kill off large amounts of yeast.
            > An alcometer is only used for ethenol & water. At gravity of 1015 the
            > wash is has significant sugars etc. Your reading doesn't help in my
            > humble opinion.Use an alcometer at the distilling stage only.
            > Hope this helps
            >
            > Graeme
            >
            > -- In new_distillers@y..., "Robert N" <dinks_c@y...> wrote:
            > > Hi all, I laid down a wash 8 days ago, using 9kg's castor sugar,
            > 25Lt's
            > > water, and 1 packet turbo extra (Still Spirits). The air
            > temperature has
            > > been between 17oC to 32oC, which makes for fantastic drinking
            > weather, but I
            > > digress. I realise that this is at the extreme upper range for the
            > turbo
            > > extra but is was 5oC cooler when I made the wash. The thing is the
            > wash is
            > > still bubbling away. It has slowed down quite a lot from the first
            > 3 days. I
            > > just took a hydrometer reading and it was 1015, the alcometer was
            > above the
            > > zero mark @32oC, even allowing for temperature variation these
            > readings
            > > seems to me to be too high. Is it because of the high ambient
            > temperature or
            > > is it because of something else? Is there anything I can do to
            > remedy the
            > > problem with this wash? Your thoughts?
            > >
            > > Have a great day!
            > >
            > > Robert
            >
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > new_distillers-unsubscribe@onelist.com
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          • Brad McMahon
            ... Just to confuse you, it really is called a saccrometer, because it measures sugar concentrations in water. Everyone calls it a hydrometer. When people are
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 4, 2001
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              At 12:43 AM 12/5/01, you wrote:
              >I am confused overf the terms S.G.meter, hydrometer and alcometer. Are these
              >all the same thing, or are some different?
              >I have a floating device with a paper scale inside it, with 4 scales - 2
              >sugars, 1 S.G., and an alcohol scale. I assume that the S.G.scale is the
              >principal one, with the others mere calculations from it. Which is it -
              >hydrometer, S.G. scale, alcometer?
              >JohnV

              Just to confuse you, it really is called a saccrometer, because
              it measures sugar concentrations in water.
              Everyone calls it a hydrometer.

              When people are referring to an alcometer they are referring
              to a hydrometer that has a scale from 0-100% concentration of alcohol.
              It is only used in an alcohol/water solution.
              Hydrometers (measuring SG and potential alcohol) are used for
              beer, wine and distiller's washes which are a mix of sugar,water
              and alcohol.

              The alcometer is an essential part of your tool kit.
              If your local homebrew store doesn't carry one, Nth American
              ones generally wont, then get one in from Australia or
              New Zealand where they are readily stocked.

              Brad
            • Rex Nairn
              Message: 16 Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2001 10:19:39 +1030 From: Brad McMahon Subject: hydrometers ... these ... Just to confuse you, it really
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 5, 2001
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                Message: 16
                Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2001 10:19:39 +1030
                From: Brad McMahon <brad@...>
                Subject: hydrometers

                At 12:43 AM 12/5/01, you wrote:
                >I am confused overf the terms S.G.meter, hydrometer and alcometer. Are
                these
                >all the same thing, or are some different?
                >I have a floating device with a paper scale inside it, with 4 scales - 2
                >sugars, 1 S.G., and an alcohol scale. I assume that the S.G.scale is the
                >principal one, with the others mere calculations from it. Which is it -
                >hydrometer, S.G. scale, alcometer?
                >JohnV

                Just to confuse you, it really is called a saccrometer, because
                it measures sugar concentrations in water.
                Everyone calls it a hydrometer.

                When people are referring to an alcometer they are referring
                to a hydrometer that has a scale from 0-100% concentration of alcohol.
                It is only used in an alcohol/water solution.
                Hydrometers (measuring SG and potential alcohol) are used for
                beer, wine and distiller's washes which are a mix of sugar,water
                and alcohol.

                The alcometer is an essential part of your tool kit.
                If your local homebrew store doesn't carry one, Nth American
                ones generally wont, then get one in from Australia or
                New Zealand where they are readily stocked.

                Brad

                hi john, brad and all,

                i have never heard of a saccrometer but it makes sense for a beer, wine wash
                hydrometer. just thought i would put in my two cents as i have answered this
                question a few times now.

                we use two types of hydrometer.

                1. the beer wine and wash hydrometer (sometimes referred to as an S.G. meter
                or saccrometer {cheers brad})

                this uses a specific gravity (S.G.) scale and measures the sugar content. it
                works on the principle that sugar is thicker than water.
                water should give an S.G. reading of 1.000 but it is important to check the
                temperature that your hydrometer is calibrated to (typically around 20° C)
                adding approximately 27 grams of sugar to a litre (sorry i am a metric boy)
                of water will move the hydrometer from 1.000 to 1.010
                so adding 6.75 kg of sugar to a 25 litre wash should give an S.G. of around
                1.100
                add a yeast and as the yeast turns the sugar to alcohol the S.G. drops back
                to 1.000
                the hydrometer will fall further than 1.000 and should reach 0.990 because
                alcohol is thinner than water and when the sugar has all been used up the
                wash will be at about 15% alcohol by volume.

                2. the spirit hydrometer (sometimes referred to as an alcometer)

                this uses a percentage scale and works on the principle that alcohol is
                thinner than water.
                again you should check the temperature that the hydrometer is calibrated to.
                if your spirit is warmer than that it will give a higher reading than it
                really is.
                thats really all there is to say about the spirit hydrometer (thank god i
                hear you all say!)

                really the key to all this is the point that the wash hydrometer works on
                the principle that sugar is thicker than water and the spirit hydrometer
                works on the principle that alcohol is thinner than water.

                i hope this is of some use.

                cheers

                rex,
              • John Vandermeulen
                Rex, Brad, thanks for the explanations re hydrometer, SG, sacharometer. I had expereienced, but had not realized that the SG dropping below 1.000 is of course
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 5, 2001
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                  Rex, Brad,
                  thanks for the explanations re hydrometer, SG, sacharometer. I had
                  expereienced, but had not realized that the SG dropping below 1.000 is of course
                  due to the alcohol having replaced the initial sugar.
                  But - you give a separate expl'n for the alcometer. Is that in fact also not
                  the same thing? It is still measuring S.G. My small floating hydrometer has 4
                  scales in it - one for each, including alcohol. Actually it reads 'potential
                  alcohol'.
                  More elucidation?
                  John V

                  Rex Nairn wrote:

                  > Message: 16
                  > Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2001 10:19:39 +1030
                  > From: Brad McMahon <brad@...>
                  > Subject: hydrometers
                  >
                  > At 12:43 AM 12/5/01, you wrote:
                  > >I am confused overf the terms S.G.meter, hydrometer and alcometer. Are
                  > these
                  > >all the same thing, or are some different?
                  > >I have a floating device with a paper scale inside it, with 4 scales - 2
                  > >sugars, 1 S.G., and an alcohol scale. I assume that the S.G.scale is the
                  > >principal one, with the others mere calculations from it. Which is it -
                  > >hydrometer, S.G. scale, alcometer?
                  > >JohnV
                  >
                  > Just to confuse you, it really is called a saccrometer, because
                  > it measures sugar concentrations in water.
                  > Everyone calls it a hydrometer.
                  >
                  > When people are referring to an alcometer they are referring
                  > to a hydrometer that has a scale from 0-100% concentration of alcohol.
                  > It is only used in an alcohol/water solution.
                  > Hydrometers (measuring SG and potential alcohol) are used for
                  > beer, wine and distiller's washes which are a mix of sugar,water
                  > and alcohol.
                  >
                  > The alcometer is an essential part of your tool kit.
                  > If your local homebrew store doesn't carry one, Nth American
                  > ones generally wont, then get one in from Australia or
                  > New Zealand where they are readily stocked.
                  >
                  > Brad
                  >
                  > hi john, brad and all,
                  >
                  > i have never heard of a saccrometer but it makes sense for a beer, wine wash
                  > hydrometer. just thought i would put in my two cents as i have answered this
                  > question a few times now.
                  >
                  > we use two types of hydrometer.
                  >
                  > 1. the beer wine and wash hydrometer (sometimes referred to as an S.G. meter
                  > or saccrometer {cheers brad})
                  >
                  > this uses a specific gravity (S.G.) scale and measures the sugar content. it
                  > works on the principle that sugar is thicker than water.
                  > water should give an S.G. reading of 1.000 but it is important to check the
                  > temperature that your hydrometer is calibrated to (typically around 20° C)
                  > adding approximately 27 grams of sugar to a litre (sorry i am a metric boy)
                  > of water will move the hydrometer from 1.000 to 1.010
                  > so adding 6.75 kg of sugar to a 25 litre wash should give an S.G. of around
                  > 1.100
                  > add a yeast and as the yeast turns the sugar to alcohol the S.G. drops back
                  > to 1.000
                  > the hydrometer will fall further than 1.000 and should reach 0.990 because
                  > alcohol is thinner than water and when the sugar has all been used up the
                  > wash will be at about 15% alcohol by volume.
                  >
                  > 2. the spirit hydrometer (sometimes referred to as an alcometer)
                  >
                  > this uses a percentage scale and works on the principle that alcohol is
                  > thinner than water.
                  > again you should check the temperature that the hydrometer is calibrated to.
                  > if your spirit is warmer than that it will give a higher reading than it
                  > really is.
                  > thats really all there is to say about the spirit hydrometer (thank god i
                  > hear you all say!)
                  >
                  > really the key to all this is the point that the wash hydrometer works on
                  > the principle that sugar is thicker than water and the spirit hydrometer
                  > works on the principle that alcohol is thinner than water.
                  >
                  > i hope this is of some use.
                  >
                  > cheers
                  >
                  > rex,
                  >
                  >
                  > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > new_distillers-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                • ups474@aol.com
                  A hydrometer is the type of device it is. A Hydrometer that has the S.G. (specific gravity) scale on it, is a hydrometer for measuring the amount of sugar in a
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 5, 2001
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                    A hydrometer is the type of device it is.
                    A Hydrometer that has the S.G. (specific gravity) scale on it, is a
                    hydrometer for measuring the amount of sugar in a mash (the POTENTIAL alcohol
                    that the mash can end up with), an alcometer is a hydrometer that measures
                    the alcohol content of a finished spirit (aka: spirits hydrometer). S.G.,
                    potential alcohol, brix, balling- are measures of sugar dissolved in mash.
                    a Proof and tralle hydrometer measures alcohol in finished spirit. Does
                    that help?
                  • Brad McMahon
                    ... Yep. They of course, measure the same way, the density of the solution. Beer/wine hydrometers measure from 1.120 down to 1.000 or thereabouts depending on
                    Message 9 of 10 , Dec 5, 2001
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                      At 07:07 AM 12/6/01, you wrote:
                      >Rex, Brad,
                      >thanks for the explanations re hydrometer, SG, sacharometer. I had
                      >expereienced, but had not realized that the SG dropping below 1.000 is of
                      >course
                      >due to the alcohol having replaced the initial sugar.
                      >But - you give a separate expl'n for the alcometer. Is that in fact also not
                      >the same thing? It is still measuring S.G. My small floating hydrometer
                      >has 4
                      >scales in it - one for each, including alcohol. Actually it reads 'potential
                      >alcohol'.
                      >More elucidation?
                      >John V

                      Yep. They of course, measure the same way, the density of the solution.
                      Beer/wine hydrometers measure from 1.120 down to 1.000 or thereabouts
                      depending on the brand of hydrometer you have.

                      The alcometer starts at 1.000 (the gravity of water) and moves down
                      to 0.794 (the gravity of pure ethanol). Of course the stem is graduated
                      from 0 - 100%.

                      So you can see why using the alcometer to measure your wash would
                      be useless and using your hydrometer to measure your distillate
                      wouldn't work too well either.

                      Potential alcohol scale.
                      This is a rough and ready way to calculate the alc./vol of your
                      beer/wine/wash.
                      See that 1.080 is really close to the 10% mark?
                      That means if you had a wine that began fermenting at 1.080 and
                      stopped at 1.000 it would contain roughly 10% alcohol.
                      If it stops higher you subtract the potential alcohol reading from it.
                      So if it stopped at 1.012 you would subtract 2% (see they are nearly lined
                      up on the hydrometer - 1.012 and 2% alcohol).
                      So your wine would be roughly 8% if it started at 1.080 and stopped at 1.012.

                      Makes sense?

                      Cheers,


                      Brad
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