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Re: Sprouting corn.......and enemies of Yeast?

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  • francis_heath
    Not true. Hybrid corn is not sterile? I feed lots of corn to cattle that is all hybred corn and I can assure you that nearly all that gets spilled on the
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 6, 2005
      Not true. Hybrid corn is not sterile? I feed lots of corn to cattle
      that is all hybred corn and I can assure you that nearly all that gets
      spilled on the ground sprouts and grows. When I have feed bunks set
      out in the winter time on ground where I grow corn in the summer, the
      volenteer corn is a real problem.
      I have also planted corn right out of the bin when I ran out of seed
      corn to finish up my silage corn acres. Got a real good stand of corn
      from the bin corn. What you get is no longer the hybred but it does
      in fact grow quite well.
      Francis

      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...> wrote:
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "knikk9" <blueraven@a...>
      > wrote:
      > > No they put in between the sacks and under leaves or wood chips to
      > > keep it warm and sprinkled water on it to keep it moist.
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Cary Rhodes"
      > <rhodeseng@y...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > I haven't had any good results from trying to sprout corn for
      > malt.
      > > >
      > > > I know the old timers used to put corn in a burlap bag and put
      > it in a
      > > > creek for several days.
      > > >
      > > > something about the flowing water.
      > > >
      > > > Then take it out and spread on screen wire for sprouting.
      > > >
      > > > I haven't tried this method though.




      > > > cary r
      >
      >
      >
      > Most of the problem is the type of corn you are trying to sprout.
      > The majority of grains (corn or otherwise) grown today are hybrid,
      > which produces seed that is mostly sterile. Here's a couple of
      > excerpts that may interest you...
      >
      > About 95 percent of our corn acreage now is planted to hybrid corn.
      > We produce at least 20 percent more corn on 25 percent fewer acres
      > than in 1930, when seed of hybrid corn became available in quantity
      > to American farmers.
      > (source: http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/timeline/corn.htm)
      >
      > There are two sorts of seed available, open pollinated and hybrid.
      > Hybrid seed is created by cross pollinating two or more varieties to
      > create a more vigorous plant. These plants are, more often than not,
      > sterile, which means that seed cannot be saved from them. Sometimes
      > the seed is viable, but very weak. Hybrid seed itself is weaker than
      > open pollinated, illustrated by its poorer germination rate.
      > (source: http://tinyurl.com/clfpp)
      >
      >
      > ...The moral of the story is simple: if you want to sprout grains,
      > buy certified seed-grain from the seed merchants. Expensive, but
      > guaranteed to sprout, and you only need enough sprouted seed grain
      > to convert the rest of the hybrid grain, usually about 20 - 25% of
      > total weight.
      >
      >
      > Slainte!
      > regards Harry
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