Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: slow ferment was weird happenings with mash

Expand Messages
  • pguy40
    ... and ... I used malted wheat, it seems to be working fine now, it just took a while for those yeasties to become aroused :-) Everything went real well, had
    Message 1 of 16 , Jul 2 7:23 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <highabv@y...> wrote:
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...>
      > wrote:
      > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "pguy40" <pguy40@y...>
      > wrote:
      >>
      > I've had a couple of wheat mashes stick on me when I deviate
      > from "standard" beer making procedures. For me, safest way is to
      > use at least 35% 6 row high enzyme barley, and hold conversion
      > temperature for 3 hours with a mash out. I make a yeast starter,
      and
      > aquarium pump in air for 12 hours minimum. I batch sparge, if that
      > matters.
      >
      > Wheat sure makes a good whiskey, though. It's worth the hassle.
      >
      > Mark

      I used malted wheat, it seems to be working fine now, it just took a
      while for those yeasties to become aroused :-)

      Everything went real well, had a good conversion, pumped air for 30
      minutes before pitching yeast. First 6 hours showed little activity.
      Now 24 hours later it's bubbling fairly aggressively.

      Thanks all,
      peter
    • Mark
      ... Did you happen to measure the initial/original specific gravity? And if you can, I d like to know what the final / terminal specific gravity is. Oh, and
      Message 2 of 16 , Jul 5 2:01 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        > I used malted wheat, it seems to be working fine now, it just took a
        > while for those yeasties to become aroused :-)
        >
        > Everything went real well, had a good conversion, pumped air for 30
        > minutes before pitching yeast. First 6 hours showed little activity.
        > Now 24 hours later it's bubbling fairly aggressively.
        >
        > Thanks all,
        > peter

        Did you happen to measure the initial/original specific gravity? And
        if you can, I'd like to know what the final / terminal specific
        gravity is. Oh, and how many pounds/kg's of wheat did you use?

        Mark
      • pguy40
        ... OG 1.048 FG 1.016 It may not have been done fermenting, I ended up with about 5% alc out of the wash (72 hours after pitching yeast). I used about 9 lbs of
        Message 3 of 16 , Jul 7 3:48 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          > Did you happen to measure the initial/original specific gravity? And
          > if you can, I'd like to know what the final / terminal specific
          > gravity is. Oh, and how many pounds/kg's of wheat did you use?
          >
          > Mark

          OG 1.048 FG 1.016 It may not have been done fermenting, I ended up with
          about 5% alc out of the wash (72 hours after pitching yeast). I used
          about 9 lbs of wheat and 1.5 lbs of wheat malt.

          Peter
        • Mark
          ... And ... with ... Comparing it to a conventional wheat home brew beer: For a 5 GAL BATCH : 2.5LB lager malt 5 LB wheat malt you should get an original
          Message 4 of 16 , Jul 7 8:06 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "pguy40" <pguy40@y...> wrote:
            > > Did you happen to measure the initial/original specific gravity?
            And
            > > if you can, I'd like to know what the final / terminal specific
            > > gravity is. Oh, and how many pounds/kg's of wheat did you use?
            > >
            > > Mark
            >
            > OG 1.048 FG 1.016 It may not have been done fermenting, I ended up
            with
            > about 5% alc out of the wash (72 hours after pitching yeast). I used
            > about 9 lbs of wheat and 1.5 lbs of wheat malt.
            >
            > Peter

            Comparing it to a conventional wheat home brew beer:
            For a "5 GAL BATCH":
            2.5LB lager malt
            5 LB wheat malt
            you should get an original gravity of around 1.048, and after
            fermentation a final gravity of around 1.013.

            The lager malt in the above recipe is necessary to provide conversion
            enzymes. I don't understand how 9 lb wheat and 1.5 lbs of wheat malt
            converted to fermentable sugars.

            Malted wheat is something like 38 points/pound/gal assuming good
            decent mash & sparging techniques. 1 pound of malted wheat should
            provide a gravity of 1.038 in a 1 gal batch. But wheat malt won't
            convert itself (starch to sugar).
          • pguy40
            ... Not sure how it works myself, but I did it based on an Ian Smiley recipe for an all wheat vodka. I think you can find it somewhere on brewhaus.com Peter
            Message 5 of 16 , Jul 8 7:02 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <highabv@y...> wrote:
              > Comparing it to a conventional wheat home brew beer:
              > For a "5 GAL BATCH":
              > 2.5LB lager malt
              > 5 LB wheat malt
              > you should get an original gravity of around 1.048, and after
              > fermentation a final gravity of around 1.013.
              >
              > The lager malt in the above recipe is necessary to provide conversion
              > enzymes. I don't understand how 9 lb wheat and 1.5 lbs of wheat malt
              > converted to fermentable sugars.
              >
              > Malted wheat is something like 38 points/pound/gal assuming good
              > decent mash & sparging techniques. 1 pound of malted wheat should
              > provide a gravity of 1.038 in a 1 gal batch. But wheat malt won't
              > convert itself (starch to sugar).

              Not sure how it works myself, but I did it based on an Ian Smiley
              recipe for an all wheat vodka. I think you can find it somewhere on
              brewhaus.com

              Peter
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.