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slow ferment was weird happenings with mash

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  • pguy40
    ... Harry, I just made an all grain wheat mash (mashed last night pitched yeast this AM) and upon adding yeast was disappointed in the lack of activity. My
    Message 1 of 16 , Jul 1, 2005
      > More viable yeast cells per litre of mash in one than in the other.
      > Common problem with pre-packaged turbos.

      Harry,

      I just made an all grain wheat mash (mashed last night pitched yeast
      this AM) and upon adding yeast was disappointed in the lack of
      activity. My sugar washes always bubbled vigorously, I can barely
      detect any bubbling at all in this. I do think it's fermenting because
      about half the grain has now risen to the surface and the room smells
      like I'm baking bread.

      Could my packet of turbo be bad? Should I add another packet? Maybe
      this minimal activity is normal?

      TIA
      Peter
    • go_stiller
      Hi Rob The best way I found was to add 16 kg sugar to large container and top to 50-litre mark with hot water and mix well. When cool separate 25 litres to
      Message 2 of 16 , Jul 1, 2005
        Hi Rob
        The best way I found was to add 16 kg sugar to large container and top
        to 50-litre mark with hot water and mix well. When cool separate 25
        litres to second container and test SG should be 1.130. In original
        stir very well to aerate and add 48 turbo pack, after 2 days when
        bubbling well, do next part. In other 25 litres add 1 desert spoon
        vegemite & 1 cup molasses mixing very well. I add this through the day
        about 2 litres at a time back to first container, takes about 16 days
        at 22C degrees and the end SG is 990.


        JW




        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Thomas
        <whosbrewing@y...> wrote:
        > Is there a best way of pitching turbo mix into 2
        > fermenters? Currently I guess. How about
        > mixing/disolving in a volume of water and adding that
        > between them? Or would thew high nutrient conc.
        > kill/stun the yeast?
        > Rob.
      • Harry
        ... other. ... yeast ... because ... smells ... Maybe ... Could be many things. Did you use sprouted wheat?, or barley? Wheat sometimes gives poor conversion.
        Message 3 of 16 , Jul 1, 2005
          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "pguy40" <pguy40@y...> wrote:
          > > More viable yeast cells per litre of mash in one than in the
          other.
          > > Common problem with pre-packaged turbos.
          >
          > Harry,
          >
          > I just made an all grain wheat mash (mashed last night pitched
          yeast
          > this AM) and upon adding yeast was disappointed in the lack of
          > activity. My sugar washes always bubbled vigorously, I can barely
          > detect any bubbling at all in this. I do think it's fermenting
          because
          > about half the grain has now risen to the surface and the room
          smells
          > like I'm baking bread.
          >
          > Could my packet of turbo be bad? Should I add another packet?
          Maybe
          > this minimal activity is normal?
          >
          > TIA
          > Peter


          Could be many things. Did you use sprouted wheat?, or barley?
          Wheat sometimes gives poor conversion.
          I assume you had everything else right such as...
          Iodine test for conversion.
          OSG recorded.
          pH between 4 and 5.
          Pitching temp ~25°C.

          If all that was right, then give it up to 24hrs. If the activity
          doesn't improve, repitch with fresh yeast. That's about all I can
          offer. Sven is the man to talk to on all-grain mashes. He may know
          some other angles.


          Slainte!
          regards Harry
        • Mark
          ... barely ... know ... I ve had a couple of wheat mashes stick on me when I deviate from standard beer making procedures. For me, safest way is to use at
          Message 4 of 16 , Jul 1, 2005
            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...>
            wrote:
            > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "pguy40" <pguy40@y...>
            wrote:
            > > > More viable yeast cells per litre of mash in one than in the
            > other.
            > > > Common problem with pre-packaged turbos.
            > >
            > > Harry,
            > >
            > > I just made an all grain wheat mash (mashed last night pitched
            > yeast
            > > this AM) and upon adding yeast was disappointed in the lack of
            > > activity. My sugar washes always bubbled vigorously, I can
            barely
            > > detect any bubbling at all in this. I do think it's fermenting
            > because
            > > about half the grain has now risen to the surface and the room
            > smells
            > > like I'm baking bread.
            > >
            > > Could my packet of turbo be bad? Should I add another packet?
            > Maybe
            > > this minimal activity is normal?
            > >
            > > TIA
            > > Peter
            >
            >
            > Could be many things. Did you use sprouted wheat?, or barley?
            > Wheat sometimes gives poor conversion.
            > I assume you had everything else right such as...
            > Iodine test for conversion.
            > OSG recorded.
            > pH between 4 and 5.
            > Pitching temp ~25°C.
            >
            > If all that was right, then give it up to 24hrs. If the activity
            > doesn't improve, repitch with fresh yeast. That's about all I can
            > offer. Sven is the man to talk to on all-grain mashes. He may
            know
            > some other angles.
            >
            >
            > Slainte!
            > regards Harry

            I've had a couple of wheat mashes stick on me when I deviate
            from "standard" beer making procedures. For me, safest way is to
            use at least 35% 6 row high enzyme barley, and hold conversion
            temperature for 3 hours with a mash out. I make a yeast starter, and
            aquarium pump in air for 12 hours minimum. I batch sparge, if that
            matters.

            Wheat sure makes a good whiskey, though. It's worth the hassle.

            Mark
          • pguy40
            ... and ... I used malted wheat, it seems to be working fine now, it just took a while for those yeasties to become aroused :-) Everything went real well, had
            Message 5 of 16 , Jul 2, 2005
              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <highabv@y...> wrote:
              > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@y...>
              > wrote:
              > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "pguy40" <pguy40@y...>
              > wrote:
              >>
              > I've had a couple of wheat mashes stick on me when I deviate
              > from "standard" beer making procedures. For me, safest way is to
              > use at least 35% 6 row high enzyme barley, and hold conversion
              > temperature for 3 hours with a mash out. I make a yeast starter,
              and
              > aquarium pump in air for 12 hours minimum. I batch sparge, if that
              > matters.
              >
              > Wheat sure makes a good whiskey, though. It's worth the hassle.
              >
              > Mark

              I used malted wheat, it seems to be working fine now, it just took a
              while for those yeasties to become aroused :-)

              Everything went real well, had a good conversion, pumped air for 30
              minutes before pitching yeast. First 6 hours showed little activity.
              Now 24 hours later it's bubbling fairly aggressively.

              Thanks all,
              peter
            • Mark
              ... Did you happen to measure the initial/original specific gravity? And if you can, I d like to know what the final / terminal specific gravity is. Oh, and
              Message 6 of 16 , Jul 5, 2005
                > I used malted wheat, it seems to be working fine now, it just took a
                > while for those yeasties to become aroused :-)
                >
                > Everything went real well, had a good conversion, pumped air for 30
                > minutes before pitching yeast. First 6 hours showed little activity.
                > Now 24 hours later it's bubbling fairly aggressively.
                >
                > Thanks all,
                > peter

                Did you happen to measure the initial/original specific gravity? And
                if you can, I'd like to know what the final / terminal specific
                gravity is. Oh, and how many pounds/kg's of wheat did you use?

                Mark
              • pguy40
                ... OG 1.048 FG 1.016 It may not have been done fermenting, I ended up with about 5% alc out of the wash (72 hours after pitching yeast). I used about 9 lbs of
                Message 7 of 16 , Jul 7, 2005
                  > Did you happen to measure the initial/original specific gravity? And
                  > if you can, I'd like to know what the final / terminal specific
                  > gravity is. Oh, and how many pounds/kg's of wheat did you use?
                  >
                  > Mark

                  OG 1.048 FG 1.016 It may not have been done fermenting, I ended up with
                  about 5% alc out of the wash (72 hours after pitching yeast). I used
                  about 9 lbs of wheat and 1.5 lbs of wheat malt.

                  Peter
                • Mark
                  ... And ... with ... Comparing it to a conventional wheat home brew beer: For a 5 GAL BATCH : 2.5LB lager malt 5 LB wheat malt you should get an original
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jul 7, 2005
                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "pguy40" <pguy40@y...> wrote:
                    > > Did you happen to measure the initial/original specific gravity?
                    And
                    > > if you can, I'd like to know what the final / terminal specific
                    > > gravity is. Oh, and how many pounds/kg's of wheat did you use?
                    > >
                    > > Mark
                    >
                    > OG 1.048 FG 1.016 It may not have been done fermenting, I ended up
                    with
                    > about 5% alc out of the wash (72 hours after pitching yeast). I used
                    > about 9 lbs of wheat and 1.5 lbs of wheat malt.
                    >
                    > Peter

                    Comparing it to a conventional wheat home brew beer:
                    For a "5 GAL BATCH":
                    2.5LB lager malt
                    5 LB wheat malt
                    you should get an original gravity of around 1.048, and after
                    fermentation a final gravity of around 1.013.

                    The lager malt in the above recipe is necessary to provide conversion
                    enzymes. I don't understand how 9 lb wheat and 1.5 lbs of wheat malt
                    converted to fermentable sugars.

                    Malted wheat is something like 38 points/pound/gal assuming good
                    decent mash & sparging techniques. 1 pound of malted wheat should
                    provide a gravity of 1.038 in a 1 gal batch. But wheat malt won't
                    convert itself (starch to sugar).
                  • pguy40
                    ... Not sure how it works myself, but I did it based on an Ian Smiley recipe for an all wheat vodka. I think you can find it somewhere on brewhaus.com Peter
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jul 8, 2005
                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Mark" <highabv@y...> wrote:
                      > Comparing it to a conventional wheat home brew beer:
                      > For a "5 GAL BATCH":
                      > 2.5LB lager malt
                      > 5 LB wheat malt
                      > you should get an original gravity of around 1.048, and after
                      > fermentation a final gravity of around 1.013.
                      >
                      > The lager malt in the above recipe is necessary to provide conversion
                      > enzymes. I don't understand how 9 lb wheat and 1.5 lbs of wheat malt
                      > converted to fermentable sugars.
                      >
                      > Malted wheat is something like 38 points/pound/gal assuming good
                      > decent mash & sparging techniques. 1 pound of malted wheat should
                      > provide a gravity of 1.038 in a 1 gal batch. But wheat malt won't
                      > convert itself (starch to sugar).

                      Not sure how it works myself, but I did it based on an Ian Smiley
                      recipe for an all wheat vodka. I think you can find it somewhere on
                      brewhaus.com

                      Peter
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