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Re: Ambiguous Barley

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  • don1lia2joe3
    I live in the states and have 2 brewing supplies here in town, have no trouble getting any kind of malt I want. Malting is not the conversion of starch to
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 7 5:18 PM
      I live in the states and have 2 brewing supplies here in town, have
      no trouble getting any kind of malt I want.

      Malting is not the conversion of starch to sugar it is the process
      of starting the grain to sprout which makes the grain produce
      enzimes. the enzimes are what turns the starch to sugar but that has
      not happened yet because the sprouting has been halted by killing
      the sprout early. the enzimes are there but it still has to be
      cooked to get the enzimes to convert the starches into sugar.

      There is a local brew shop here that is called high gravity, they
      have a web site but I do not know what that is without looking it
      up, anyhow they sell any kind of malt you could want and it all runs
      about $1 a pound in small quantities, do not know what the web price
      is but it is cheaper in bulk.

      if your barley is malted it will be light weight, if it is very hard
      and heavy then it is not malted and you may have to do that yourself.

      2 row barley is about the size of unpopped popcorn, maybe a little
      larger and definatly more elongated, 6 row is naturally smaller, but
      for the kind of brewing we are doing it really does not matter.

      Good luck and have fun.

      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Sells" <kyoto@c...>
      wrote:
      > Sir,
      >
      > Besides the known fact that malt tastes sweet (malting IS the
      conversion of
      > starch to sugars) , it is VERY HARD to get 6-row in the states, I
      have
      > tried for an experiment in my own brewing endeavors. Six row will
      have
      > smaller kernels than the 2 row (because of space on the barley
      stalk) The
      > law of averages states, that it is 2 row.
      >
      > > [Original Message]
      > > From: "tec4" <tec4@y...>
      > > Subject: Ambiguous Barley
      > >
      > > Hi,
      > >
      > > I just purchased some barley from the local mill that they claim
      > > is "barley malt", however the label on the bag only
      says "barley" and
      > > has nothing about it being a malt or being malted. The guy
      behind the
      > > counter gave me a strange look when I asked whether this was 2-
      row
      > > barley or 6-row, so that is also under debate! Does anyone have
      any
      > > suggestions on how to determine whether the sack is already
      malted,
      > > or what variety of barley this actually is?
    • tdb8552
      ... Dave, The other replies to your post are accurate in saying your best bet is to taste it. If it tastes sweet, it has been malted. If not, it is unmalted
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 8 2:51 AM
        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tec4" <tec4@y...> wrote:
        > Hi,
        >
        > I just purchased some barley from the local mill that they claim
        > is "barley malt", however the label on the bag only says "barley" and
        > has nothing about it being a malt or being malted. The guy behind the
        > counter gave me a strange look when I asked whether this was 2-row
        > barley or 6-row, so that is also under debate! Does anyone have any
        > suggestions on how to determine whether the sack is already malted,
        > or what variety of barley this actually is?
        >
        > Thanks!
        > Dave

        Dave,

        The other replies to your post are accurate in saying your best bet is
        to taste it. If it tastes sweet, it has been malted. If not, it is
        unmalted barley.

        I am in the reading and learning stage with respect to distilling. I
        have not even built a still, let alone made a wash or done stripping
        run. However, I have been a home brewer for about 20 years. The hobby
        has changed dramatically in that time.

        You might want to buy from a different supplier. It looks like this
        guy doesn't know what he is selling, and you don't know what you are
        buying. Check out some of the home brewing sites on the web. Brewing
        beers and ales at home is a hugely popular hobby, it is legal, and the
        processes are well understood. There is a lot of reliable information
        available, and there are a number of suppliers who will be happy to
        tell you the difference between American 2-row malt and American 6-row
        malt, and would not dream of selling you unmalted barley unless you
        clearly asked for it. Although American malt is more readily available
        (for obvious reasons), German and British malts are also available. If
        you plan to distill it rather than bottle it as beer, it might make
        more sense to buy malt extracts. You can buy American, Australian,
        British, Dutch, and German malt extracts. Malt extracts do not require
        mashing.

        By the way, malting is the process of germinating the grains and then
        drying them in a kiln to activate enzymes necessary for mashing.
        Mashing is the process of converting starch into fermentable sugar.

        Good luck to you.

        Tom
      • tec4
        Hi again, I appreciate the help! Based on the chewing test it would appear that I have a 50-lb sack of unmalted barley... I also can find a bunch of different
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 8 7:59 AM
          Hi again,

          I appreciate the help! Based on the chewing test it would appear that
          I have a 50-lb sack of unmalted barley... I also can find a bunch of
          different malts at local homebrewing shops, but the mill wanted $15
          (unmalted, apparently) instead of the $40 (malted) asked by the brew
          shops. Depending on how the malting goes, I guess I'll see whether it
          was worth saving the money.

          Thanks for the responses!
          Dave
        • Kim
          Dave, whole feed barley is usually hard to find but whole feed wheat is available at most feed stores for $6 for 50 lbs... Wheat is easy to malt and works just
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 8 8:59 AM
            Dave,

            whole feed barley is usually hard to find but whole feed wheat is
            available at most feed stores for $6 for 50 lbs... Wheat is easy to
            malt and works just as well as barley..I malt my own for a corn and
            wheat mash... the only difference is when it comes to straining the
            mash... wheat gums up the works until after the mash is fermented then
            it will strain ok....

            You can also malt the barley that you have.... its easy

            Kim

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tec4" <tec4@y...> wrote:
            > Hi again,
            >
            > I appreciate the help! Based on the chewing test it would appear that
            > I have a 50-lb sack of unmalted barley... I also can find a bunch of
            > different malts at local homebrewing shops, but the mill wanted $15
            > (unmalted, apparently) instead of the $40 (malted) asked by the brew
            > shops. Depending on how the malting goes, I guess I'll see whether it
            > was worth saving the money.
            >
            > Thanks for the responses!
            > Dave
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