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Re: Scotch flavours

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  • Mark
    ... wrote: snip 55% vs 40% may in part be the concentration of alcohol effecting the sense of taste. Try some neutral alcohol diluted to the same two
    Message 1 of 23 , May 2 2:57 PM
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      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Sven Pfitt" <thegimp98@y...>
      wrote:
      snip

      55% vs 40% may in part be the concentration of alcohol effecting the
      sense of taste. Try some neutral alcohol diluted to the same two
      concentrations and see how they are sensed. I suspect your buddies
      will prefer the 40% over the 55% and attribute some of the sharpness
      to the concentration itself.

      Sven


      good idea. that would show how much the "harsh" is due to abv alone.
      I'll try it on the group next weekend.
    • Ian
      Still Spirits have just released a kit with many different flavours and much scope for experimentation. Looks interesting. Its called a Whisky Profile Kit.
      Message 2 of 23 , May 10 2:40 AM
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        Still Spirits have just released a kit with many
        different flavours and much scope for experimentation.
        Looks interesting. Its called a Whisky Profile Kit.
        Rgds Ian
        --- Ian <sdrambo133@...> wrote:
        > Thank you I'll give it a go. Rgds Ian
        > --- Robert N <dinks_c@...> wrote:
        > > Really Rambo the only way to get a "Single Malt
        > > Scotch" is to make it out of
        > > grain yourself. I have adjusted my tastebuds down
        > > and for everyday drinking
        > > I have found mixing two of the different scotch
        > > essences together, have
        > > given me a wider flavour profile. I must admit to
        > > adulterating it with soda
        > > water though;- The circle of friends that
        > regularly
        > > drink Scotch and mix it
        > > with lolly water etc all rave about it. Or more
        > > correctly, bitch about
        > > having to drink Johnny Walker etc.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > The recipe I use is one packet of still spirits
        > > classic whiskey (green
        > > label) and one bottle of Samuel Willard's whiskey
        > > essence mixed in the
        > > quantities as per the packaging. To this I add 4.5
        > > litres of neutral spirit
        > > that has been oaked for 2~4 weeks. Makes 4 x
        > 1125ml
        > > (40oz) bottles. Leaving
        > > the made up bottles sit for a couple of weeks also
        > > helps.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Yours in Spirit
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Robert
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > _____
        > >
        > > From: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        > > [mailto:new_distillers@yahoogroups.com]
        > > On Behalf Of sdrambo133
        > > Sent: Friday, April 22, 2005 6:41 PM
        > > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        > > Subject: [new_distillers] Scotch flavours
        > >
        > >
        > > I've tried quite a few of the still spirits and
        > > edwards scotch flavours
        > > and found them to be ordinary. Any members come
        > > across a winner or is
        > > it too much expect of a little bottle of
        > flavouring
        > > to give an
        > > authentic single malt scotch.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
        > > removed]
        > >
        > >
        >
        > __________________________________________________
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      • Tom
        Harry, I am working on scotch flavoring some of my first neutral spirit. I intend to make your peatreek (message # 15749)for adding the flavor. I secured
        Message 3 of 23 , May 4 7:00 AM
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          Harry,

          I am working on "scotch" flavoring some of my first neutral spirit. I intend to make your peatreek (message # 15749)for adding the flavor. I secured some heavily toasted oak from my wine supply shop so that should do for the oak part. I am worried about over toasting the peat. I have a camp oven (with temperature indicator). I intend to set it up outside and will toast the tin of peat inside the oven. Can you (or anyone) suggest a proper temperature and time for toasting the tin of peat? I am concerned that if I try to toast it with a torch, I might under toast or over toast it.

          Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

          Tom

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Rana Pipiens <ranawater@y...>
          > wrote:
          > > Harry, how exactly do you leach garden peat and what would I be
          > looking for at my garden center? Thanks, Rana
          >
          >
          >
          > What you need is "essence of peatreek" (my name for it, so don't try
          > to find it in a store) :-)
          >
          > (SNIP)
          > You can easily trap these phenols to be used in measurable
          > quantities by making an "essence". Take a handful each of peat and
          > oak shavings, put them in a tin (or 'can' to the Stateside folk).
          > Loosely fit a lid, then flame the tin with a torch for a couple of
          > minutes. This will toast the oak and extract the phenols from the
          > peat which in turn will stick to the toasted oak. DON'T charcoal
          > the oak, just toast it.
          >
          > Leave the lid on, and set the tin aside for a few minutes to cool,
          > as the next step uses high abv alcohol, and you don't want it to
          > catch fire.
          >
          > (SNIP)
          >
          > HTH
          > Slainte!
          > regards Harry
          >
        • tgfoitwoods
          Tom, I m not sure how it ll work for you, but it s taken multiply tries for me to get the smokiness right. I put the peat and oak shavings (made with a hand
          Message 4 of 23 , May 5 8:16 AM
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            Tom,

            I'm not sure how it'll work for you, but it's taken multiply tries for me to get the smokiness right. I put the peat and oak shavings (made with a hand plane from barrel staves)in a tin tea box that has had its paint cooked off. I put that in my gas (covered) grill, and lest it run for maybe 2 hours, and it still wasn't as much smoke as I'd like.

            Next time, I'll go for more time, let it cool completely, and test it by nose. Them, if needed, I'll give it more time. Also, maybe it's time for me to try our local "beach peat", a semi-hard compressed peat that comes out from underneath our sand cliffs at the shore.

            Sorry I don't have a simple answer.

            Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomhawk412@...> wrote:
            >
            > Harry,
            >
            > I am working on "scotch" flavoring some of my first neutral spirit. I intend to make your peatreek (message # 15749)for adding the flavor. I secured some heavily toasted oak from my wine supply shop so that should do for the oak part. I am worried about over toasting the peat. I have a camp oven (with temperature indicator). I intend to set it up outside and will toast the tin of peat inside the oven. Can you (or anyone) suggest a proper temperature and time for toasting the tin of peat? I am concerned that if I try to toast it with a torch, I might under toast or over toast it.
            >
            > Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
            >
            > Tom
            >
            ----snip----
          • Tom
            Z Bob, Thanks for the advice. I m about to try my camp oven. I think I ll just pick a temperature and try for different time intervals. I will report the
            Message 5 of 23 , May 5 9:39 AM
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              Z Bob,

              Thanks for the advice. I'm about to try my camp oven. I think I'll just pick a temperature and try for different time intervals. I will report the results.

              Thanks,

              Tom

              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
              >
              > Tom,
              >
              > I'm not sure how it'll work for you, but it's taken multiply tries for me to get the smokiness right. I put the peat and oak shavings (made with a hand plane from barrel staves)in a tin tea box that has had its paint cooked off. I put that in my gas (covered) grill, and lest it run for maybe 2 hours, and it still wasn't as much smoke as I'd like.
              >
              > Next time, I'll go for more time, let it cool completely, and test it by nose. Them, if needed, I'll give it more time. Also, maybe it's time for me to try our local "beach peat", a semi-hard compressed peat that comes out from underneath our sand cliffs at the shore.
              >
              > Sorry I don't have a simple answer.
              >
              > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
              >
              > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomhawk412@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Harry,
              > >
              > > I am working on "scotch" flavoring some of my first neutral spirit. I intend to make your peatreek (message # 15749)for adding the flavor. I secured some heavily toasted oak from my wine supply shop so that should do for the oak part. I am worried about over toasting the peat. I have a camp oven (with temperature indicator). I intend to set it up outside and will toast the tin of peat inside the oven. Can you (or anyone) suggest a proper temperature and time for toasting the tin of peat? I am concerned that if I try to toast it with a torch, I might under toast or over toast it.
              > >
              > > Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
              > >
              > > Tom
              > >
              > ----snip----
              >
            • tgfoitwoods
              Thanks, Tom, I d sure appreciate that. Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
              Message 6 of 23 , May 5 12:02 PM
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                Thanks, Tom,

                I'd sure appreciate that.

                Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomhawk412@...> wrote:
                >
                > Z Bob,
                >
                > Thanks for the advice. I'm about to try my camp oven. I think I'll just pick a temperature and try for different time intervals. I will report the results.
                >
                > Thanks,
                >
                > Tom
                >
                ----snip----
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