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Blending Question

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  • Terry
    Being from Canada I love rye whiskey, I know that each brand is blended,some up to 50, but what I do not know is how the bleding is done. Each type of whiskey
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 3, 2005
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      Being from Canada I love rye whiskey, I know that each brand is
      blended,some up to 50, but what I do not know is how the bleding is
      done. Each type of whiskey contains various tastes for eg Crown royal
      has sugarcane, caramel, oak, english toffe, apricots. so my question
      is how do they get those different tastes in the whiskey. Do they
      make
      a rye mash with sugarcane, and a rye mash with caramel, a rye mash
      with apricots, age them in oak barrles then blend them till they get
      their desired taste, or is it a result of aging only in different
      types of cooperages. Any thopughts on this would be greatly
      appreciated.
    • popwahtosh
      ... royal ... question ... ================== Hi Terry. I ve been told that most Canadian whisky producers start out with neutral spirits and blend commercial
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 3, 2005
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        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Terry" <tmasikewich@y...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Being from Canada I love rye whiskey, I know that each brand is
        > blended,some up to 50, but what I do not know is how the bleding is
        > done. Each type of whiskey contains various tastes for eg Crown
        royal
        > has sugarcane, caramel, oak, english toffe, apricots. so my
        question
        > is how do they get those different tastes in the whiskey. (snip)
        ==================
        Hi Terry. I've been told that most Canadian whisky producers start
        out with neutral spirits and blend commercial essences into their
        product. These essences are basically what we buy to flavor our
        stuff. They are probably custom formulated to each producers
        specifications. I read somewhere that many of these companies even
        purchase their spirits from other companies/distillers. There are
        probably companies in the US and other countries that practice this
        method as well. Maybe someone else will come along and add some info
        to this.

        Regards,

        Pop
      • Sven Pfitt
        Pop, you have been told wrong. Search Hyram Walker on the web and the links indicate the Canadian Whiskey manufacturers still make their whiskey the old way,
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 4, 2005
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          Pop, you have been told wrong.

          Search Hyram Walker on the web and the links indicate the Canadian
          Whiskey manufacturers still make their whiskey the old way, not with
          neutral spirits and essence.

          Blending is done to insure consistant flavor and aroma. Blending is a
          process of combining spirits of different ages and types to produce a
          desired combined flavor.

          They do use netural spirit to cut some whiskeys. However, the flavors
          come from a combination of yeast, grain, and aging in wood.

          Sven

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "popwahtosh" <popwahtosh@y...>
          wrote:
          >
          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Terry" <tmasikewich@y...>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > Being from Canada I love rye whiskey, I know that each brand is
          > > blended,some up to 50, but what I do not know is how the bleding
          is
          > > done. Each type of whiskey contains various tastes for eg Crown
          > royal
          > > has sugarcane, caramel, oak, english toffe, apricots. so my
          > question
          > > is how do they get those different tastes in the whiskey. (snip)
          > ==================
          > Hi Terry. I've been told that most Canadian whisky producers start
          > out with neutral spirits and blend commercial essences into their
          > product. These essences are basically what we buy to flavor our
          > stuff. They are probably custom formulated to each producers
          > specifications. I read somewhere that many of these companies even
          > purchase their spirits from other companies/distillers. There are
          > probably companies in the US and other countries that practice this
          > method as well. Maybe someone else will come along and add some
          info
          > to this.
          >
          > Regards,
          >
          > Pop
        • Sven Pfitt
          Check out the TTB site for the US govt. They are very strict about what you can label a spirit. Even to the point of denying vodka can be called vodka if it
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 4, 2005
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            Check out the TTB site for the US govt. They are very strict about
            what you can label a spirit. Even to the point of denying vodka can
            be called vodka if it has been stored in wood. They have
            clasifications for virtually every distilled spirit imaginable
            including what the minimum requirements are.

            For example:
            Rev. Ruling 61-25

            Distilled Spirits Labeling

            Section 5.21(b)(7) of the Distilled Spirits Labeling and Advertising
            Regulations under the Federal Alcohol Administration Act defines a
            product bearing the designation "blended whisky," or the alternative
            designation "whisky - a blend," as a mixture which contains at least
            20 percent by volume of 100 degrees proof straight whisky and,
            separately or in combination, whisky or neutral spirits, if such
            mixture at the time of bottling is not less than 80 degrees proof.
            Heretofore, if all of the component whiskies in any such mixture were
            distilled in Kentucky, the name "Kentucky" could preface the
            designation "blended whisky" on the label only if the mixture were
            also blended in Kentucky. If the identical mixture were blended in
            another state and the bottler desired to preface the designation in
            that same manner, he had to employ, instead, the alternate
            designation "whisky - a blend" to avoid creating any misleading
            impression in the mind of the consumer that the act of blending
            occurred in Kentucky. Since it is the whisky component, and not the
            location of blending, that contributes the flavor characteristics of
            the end product, the distinctions in labeling thus practiced have
            little or no practical value to the consumer. For that reason, they
            should not be continued. Held, the designation "Kentucky blended
            whisky" or "Kentucky whisky-blend" is an appropriate label
            designation for blended whisky, wherever blended in the United
            States, if all of the component whiskies in the blend are distilled
            in the State of Kentucky.

            27 U.S.C. 205; 27 CFR 5.41 (27 CFR 5.42)


            I suspect Canadian laws are as strict with regards to the Canadian
            whiskey industry as it protects the industry from cheap imitations.

            Sven
            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Sven Pfitt" <thegimp98@y...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Pop, you have been told wrong.
            >
            > Search Hyram Walker on the web and the links indicate the Canadian
            > Whiskey manufacturers still make their whiskey the old way, not
            with
            > neutral spirits and essence.
            >
            > Blending is done to insure consistant flavor and aroma. Blending is
            a
            > process of combining spirits of different ages and types to produce
            a
            > desired combined flavor.
            >
            > They do use netural spirit to cut some whiskeys. However, the
            flavors
            > come from a combination of yeast, grain, and aging in wood.
            >
            > Sven
            >
            > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "popwahtosh"
            <popwahtosh@y...>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Terry" <tmasikewich@y...>
            > > wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Being from Canada I love rye whiskey, I know that each brand is
            > > > blended,some up to 50, but what I do not know is how the
            bleding
            > is
            > > > done. Each type of whiskey contains various tastes for eg Crown
            > > royal
            > > > has sugarcane, caramel, oak, english toffe, apricots. so my
            > > question
            > > > is how do they get those different tastes in the whiskey. (snip)
            > > ==================
            > > Hi Terry. I've been told that most Canadian whisky producers
            start
            > > out with neutral spirits and blend commercial essences into
            their
            > > product. These essences are basically what we buy to flavor our
            > > stuff. They are probably custom formulated to each producers
            > > specifications. I read somewhere that many of these companies
            even
            > > purchase their spirits from other companies/distillers. There are
            > > probably companies in the US and other countries that practice
            this
            > > method as well. Maybe someone else will come along and add some
            > info
            > > to this.
            > >
            > > Regards,
            > >
            > > Pop
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