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Pictures of Oak

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  • Alex _{*L*}_ (a.k.a. BOKAKOB)
    Everyone is talking oak these days. I think after reading so much about oaking and aging I am ripe enough to try. However, I would like to gather some
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 31, 2005
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      Everyone is talking oak these days. I think after reading so much about "oaking" and "aging" I am ripe enough to try. However, I would like to gather some branches of the oak tree and make chips out of that stock instead of purchasing it. This way I know it is oak, not maple AND I know it was not treated, AND it is organic :-)

      I would like to ask someone who knows this subject to post a few pictures of suitable oak trees and its leaves in the photos or files section, please. This way I will be able to collect some of the branches, dry, cut and cook them.

      My next extrapolation is: "Why oak?" It is historical that oak was the strongest and most available tree to make barrels in old days. I wonder, if I use other type of wood, perhaps I will get a better flavor? Maple? Birch? Sandal? Mahogany? :-)




      Alex_{*L*}_(a.k.a. BOKAKOB)
      http://briefcase.yahoo.com/bokakob

























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    • Stillwaters
      Alex, Go to http://tinyurl.com/4vtyp. The tree is prolific in eastern US. Search Google and you can see pix of foliage and bark. One cue is it doesn t shed
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 31, 2005
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        Alex,
        Go to http://tinyurl.com/4vtyp. The tree is prolific in eastern US.
        Search Google and you can see pix of foliage and bark. One cue is it
        doesn't shed it's dead leaves til late winter-early spring (now in US)
        Regards,
        Glenn



        >
        > Everyone is talking oak these days. I think after reading so much
        about "oaking" and "aging" I am ripe enough to try. However, I would
        like to gather some branches of the oak tree and make chips out of
        that stock instead of purchasing it. This way I know it is oak, not
        maple AND I know it was not treated, AND it is organic :-)
        >
        > I would like to ask someone who knows this subject to post a few
        pictures
      • Lmemarime
        Just type Quercus Alba into your search and it will give you alot of links for it. ... Yahoo! Messenger Show us what our next emoticon should look like. Join
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 1, 2005
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          Just type Quercus Alba into your search and it will give you alot of links for it.

          ---------------------------------
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          Show us what our next emoticon should look like. Join the fun.

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        • don1lia2joe3
          I know this post is over a week old but maybe I can help you understand something. Oak, White oak in particular contains tannic acid, This tannic is where
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 8, 2005
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            I know this post is over a week old but maybe I can help you
            understand something.

            Oak, White oak in particular contains tannic acid, This "tannic" is
            where the term Tanning came from when refering to tanned leather.
            The tannic acid is more than just a preservative, it works on a
            molecular level on what it reacts with, because it is an acid it
            oxidizes the alcohol.

            Tannic acid is bitter to the taste, do not add it to your alcohol!

            Oak barrels were charred inside to form carbon which they thought
            would filter out the bitter taste of the tannic acid, and in fact it
            did/does.

            Now what exactly the burnt oak does for the alcohol is to allow the
            alcohol to react with the tannic acid which oxidizes the alcohol
            causing it to age and at the same time filtering out the bitterness
            of the tannic acid. At the same time it does add some flavor of the
            oak but it is a different taste than just chewing on oak.

            The oak needs to be aged a year or more before use to dry out some
            of the moisture or you will get to much color/flavor/bitterness in
            your alcohol

            Now I am not a scientist, I learned all this from stories from
            oldtimers but it makes sense to me.

            Don



            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Alex _{*L*}_ \(a.k.a.
            BOKAKOB\)" <bokakob@y...> wrote:
            >
            > > I would like to ask someone who knows this subject to post a few
            pictures of suitable oak trees and its leaves in the photos or files
            section, please. This way I will be able to collect some of the
            branches, dry, cut and cook them.
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            > Alex_{*L*}_(a.k.a. BOKAKOB)
            > http://briefcase.yahoo.com/bokakob
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          • Mark
            ... about oaking and aging I am ripe enough to try. ... Alex: I ve bought bag chips before- most chips were oak, but some chips were NOT oak. I ve been
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 8, 2005
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              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Alex _{*L*}_ \(a.k.a.
              BOKAKOB\)" <bokakob@y...> wrote:
              >
              > Everyone is talking oak these days. I think after reading so much
              about "oaking" and "aging" I am ripe enough to try. >
              >

              Alex:
              I've bought bag chips before- most chips were oak, but some chips
              were NOT oak.

              I've been using oak on neutral spirits since the late 1990's. A
              buddy of mine that makes oak furniture provides me the chips from
              board lumber that he selects for projects. So I know the source.
              Maybe you can find a similar source.

              I toast mine in a homemade heated vacuum chamber, at the lower
              middle end of the temperature range suggested on Tony's site.

              The abv of the spirit that you're aging affects the finished taste.
              I don't understand why. I oak flavor with 50abv, then cut to 40abv
              for drinking. It's a different taste than directly oaking directly
              on 40abv.

              I also thermal cycle the immersion. 2 days in the fridge, then 2
              days in the warmest place in the house. Repeat for 2 weeks. This
              seems to double the flavor extracted.

              If it's too "oak - ey" (is that a word?), I cut with neutral.

              In January I placed a folder in the files section of this group -
              this shows how I do it.

              I've tried different woods:
              untoasted white oak - good, a touch astringent
              mesquite - not good
              hickery - strange and different, smelled stronger than it tasted.
              apple - not bad, but bitter and sharp.
            • Alex _{*L*}_ (a.k.a. BOKAKOB)
              Thak you, Mark. Regarding different flavors at different spirit strength -- I think the more alcohol you have in the mix the more it tries to pull in water out
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 9, 2005
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                Thak you, Mark. Regarding different flavors at different spirit strength -- I think the more alcohol you have in the mix the more it tries to pull in water out of oak.
                At the same time that water carries over dilluted flavor additives.

                Mark <highabv@...> wrote:The abv of the spirit that you're aging affects the finished taste. I don't understand why.



                Alex_{*L*}_(a.k.a. BOKAKOB)
                http://briefcase.yahoo.com/bokakob

























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              • donald holcombe
                When I tried aging on oak the first time I used some toasted oak chips marketetd for wine . In wine I thought it left a nice oak 7 vanilla taste. When I put
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 9, 2005
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                  When I tried aging on oak the first time I used some toasted oak chips marketetd for wine . In wine I thought it left a nice oak 7 vanilla taste. When I put 130 proof bourbon on it the taste was bitter and harsh. I got some 80 proof on some of the same chips.So far its OK. The instructions say boil the chipsto sterilize I suppose. Does anyone boil there chips ? Im going to charcoal then oak my next batch. I put chips and carbon in a small batch and the carbon sucked the color out of the likker so I know its doing something.

                  "Alex _{*L*}_ (a.k.a. BOKAKOB)" <bokakob@...> wrote:Thak you, Mark. Regarding different flavors at different spirit strength -- I think the more alcohol you have in the mix the more it tries to pull in water out of oak.
                  At the same time that water carries over dilluted flavor additives.

                  Mark <highabv@...> wrote:The abv of the spirit that you're aging affects the finished taste. I don't understand why.



                  Alex_{*L*}_(a.k.a. BOKAKOB)
                  http://briefcase.yahoo.com/bokakob

























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