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RE: [new_distillers] Re: 1st Run "Teething Problems"

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  • Tony & Elle Ackland
    ... This is an ester, called isoamyl acetate It means something to the beer brewers - one of the side reactions that they don t exactly want. Similar esters,
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 1, 2001
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      > One thing though that I am curious about, when the beer was coming up
      > to boil, the temperature at the top of the still head had not moved
      > from 12c, but just before it stared to move I got a strong smell
      > of "alcoholic bananas", quite pleasant really,

      This is an ester, called isoamyl acetate
      It means something to the beer brewers - one of the side reactions that
      they don't exactly want.

      Similar esters, used as artifical flavours include ..
      apricot : amyl butyrate
      apple : isoamyl isovalerate
      pineapple : ethyl butyrate
      grape : methyl anthranilate
      wintergreen : methyl slicylate

      > and then if I smell
      > for vapour at then exit of the still a VERY strong alcoholic vapour
      > smell, lasted for about a minute and throughout all this time no
      > temperature change, still 12c?? Any ideas?

      Could be the first of the alcohol being pushed out along with the air, too
      rapidly past the condenser ?? Guessing here.

      > Also, when I come to distill the "fine wine", I will have about 20
      > litres of 50% by volume alcohol, how long do you think that this will
      > take to distill, FYI so you don't have to read #1130, I have a 3kw
      > heater with a 42mm by 1.2 metre fractionating tube?

      About 22 minutes to heat up to boiling point, then maybe 6 hours to distill
      off ? Its going to depend on what reflux ratio you need - 360 minutes is
      based on RR=3
      See http:\\homedistiller.org\reflux_calc.htm

      > Another question whilst I am asking, why would you bother trying to
      > distill 94% alchol slowly, if you could distill 80% a lot faster,
      > (assuming the other 20% is water) if at the end you're going to add
      > water to get it to say 50% anyway?

      Its the difference between having 6% impurities present, or 20%
      Although the 6% or 20% is mostly water, there's still enough other
      alcohols, aldehydes, esters, etc present, in very trace amounts, to affect
      the flavour.
      The cleaner you can distill the alcohol to begin with, the less flavour it
      will have after its been diluted.
      The 80% spirit will be rougher, and burn more in the throat, whereas the
      94% one will be smoother, after they've both been knocked down to 50%

      Tony
    • hal031235@hotmail.com
      Thanks Tony Ron asked : One thing though that I am curious about, when the beer was coming up ... moved ... Tony wrote : This is an ester, called isoamyl
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 2, 2001
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        Thanks Tony
        Ron asked :
        "> > One thing though that I am curious about, when the beer was
        coming up
        > > to boil, the temperature at the top of the still head had not
        moved
        > > from 12c, but just before it stared to move I got a strong smell
        > > of "alcoholic bananas", quite pleasant really"

        Tony wrote :

        "This is an ester, called isoamyl acetate
        > It means something to the beer brewers - one of the side reactions
        that they don't exactly want."

        My new question :
        Will this ester be absent in the distilled alcohol, ie is it boiled
        off first or will I end up with Banana Vodka? Also, could I have
        avoided it when fermenting my sugar and bakers yeast wash by doing
        something different?

        thanks for all yorur help, you are very generous with your time

        regards
        Ron
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