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Re: Chlorinated Water

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  • Mark
    Normally, boiling water will drive away the chlorine. With a still, you are collecting the chlorinated vapor. Try boiling the water BEFORE fermenting. That
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 2, 2004
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      Normally, boiling water will drive away the chlorine. With a still,
      you are collecting the chlorinated vapor. Try boiling the water
      BEFORE fermenting. That is generally taught in homebrewing 101.

      However, many municipal water systems are using chloramines. This is
      a compound of chlorine and ammonia. It cannot be boiled away. The
      easiest way to remove chloramines is to let it sit in the open for 3-
      5 days. Need some a little faster, try an activated carbon filter
      (Brita). Brita filters are not the fastest, but are cheap enough I
      use it for all my brewing water.

      When chloramines breakdown, they produce possible carcinogens. Most
      notable is tri-halo chloamine. During fermenting they produce
      chlorophenols. This lends a medicinal/band-aid flavor/aroma.


      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "ranah2o" <ranah2o@y...> wrote:
      > Hi Folks. I used some tapwater to dilute some of my product and
      even
      > though I normally cannot detect the taste of chlorine in tap
      drinking
      > water, I definately could when used as a dilutant. My question is
      to
      > those with the Kenmore water purifiers. Will water run through the
      > purifier be a good choice for diluting? Thanks, Rana
    • Rana Pipiens
      Austin and Mark, I was referring to dilution of a double distilled product of about 160proof. I want to dilute to 80proof and add a tequila essence and didn t
      Message 2 of 14 , Feb 2, 2004
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        Austin and Mark, I was referring to dilution of a double distilled product of about 160proof. I want to dilute to 80proof and add a tequila essence and didn't expect the tapwater to give such an off taste before flavoring. Boiling would be much faster anyway I guess. Thanks for the response friends. Rana
        Mark <brewmaster411@...> wrote:Normally, boiling water will drive away the chlorine. With a still,
        you are collecting the chlorinated vapor. Try boiling the water
        BEFORE fermenting. That is generally taught in homebrewing 101.

        However, many municipal water systems are using chloramines. This is
        a compound of chlorine and ammonia. It cannot be boiled away. The
        easiest way to remove chloramines is to let it sit in the open for 3-
        5 days. Need some a little faster, try an activated carbon filter
        (Brita). Brita filters are not the fastest, but are cheap enough I
        use it for all my brewing water.

        When chloramines breakdown, they produce possible carcinogens. Most
        notable is tri-halo chloamine. During fermenting they produce
        chlorophenols. This lends a medicinal/band-aid flavor/aroma.


        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "ranah2o" <ranah2o@y...> wrote:
        > Hi Folks. I used some tapwater to dilute some of my product and
        even
        > though I normally cannot detect the taste of chlorine in tap
        drinking
        > water, I definately could when used as a dilutant. My question is
        to
        > those with the Kenmore water purifiers. Will water run through the
        > purifier be a good choice for diluting? Thanks, Rana



        New Distillers group archives are at http://archive.nnytech.net/
        FAQ and other information available at http://homedistiller.org




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      • Harry
        ... product of about 160proof. I want to dilute to 80proof and add a tequila essence and didn t expect the tapwater to give such an off taste before
        Message 3 of 14 , Feb 2, 2004
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          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Rana Pipiens <ranah2o@y...>
          wrote:
          > Austin and Mark, I was referring to dilution of a double distilled
          product of about 160proof. I want to dilute to 80proof and add a
          tequila essence and didn't expect the tapwater to give such an off
          taste before flavoring. Boiling would be much faster anyway I
          guess. Thanks for the response friends. Rana



          Hi Rana,
          For dilution (cutting) of product to drinkable strength, use
          distilled water only. Anything else will (at best) change the
          flavour profile, or (at worst) introduce things into your body that
          you might regret. Water distilled by reverse osmosis membrane
          process is readily available at your supermarket in 1 to 15 litre
          packages at very reasonable cost ($5 AUD here for 15 lt). Spring
          water is not recommended as it contains too many dissolved
          minerals/salts.

          HTH

          Slainte!
          regards Harry
        • Mythik
          can you still distill filtered water in the same still as you distill alcohol, or would you have to take it apart and clean it rigourously everytime you d like
          Message 4 of 14 , Feb 2, 2004
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            can you still distill filtered water in the same still as you distill alcohol, or would you have to take it apart and clean it rigourously everytime you'd like to switch?

            ===Monica


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Rana Pipiens
            Harry wrote: Harry, I checked the Kenmore manual and it seems that it removes most of the nasty crap in tap water. I bought the unit
            Message 5 of 14 , Feb 2, 2004
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              Harry <gnikomson2000@...> wrote: Harry, I checked the Kenmore manual and it seems that it removes most of the nasty crap in tap water. I bought the unit to use as a experiment still, but after it leaked above the boiler vessel twice, I became tired of lossin valuable wash and haven't tried it again (anyone with similar happy experiences?).
              Monica, after running wash through this unit it seemed to produce good purified water. I'm going to give it a second go with some less expensive wash. I made a run with it a couple times and it worked okay. Rana


              Hi Rana,
              For dilution (cutting) of product to drinkable strength, use
              distilled water only. Anything else will (at best) change the
              flavour profile, or (at worst) introduce things into your body that
              you might regret. Water distilled by reverse osmosis membrane
              process is readily available at your supermarket in 1 to 15 litre
              packages at very reasonable cost ($5 AUD here for 15 lt). Spring
              water is not recommended as it contains too many dissolved
              minerals/salts.

              HTH

              Slainte!
              regards Harry



              New Distillers group archives are at http://archive.nnytech.net/
              FAQ and other information available at http://homedistiller.org





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            • Brain Solenoid
              ... Harry, You bring up a very interesting point...........the purity of water in Scottish Single Malts (or Whiskeys). I would doubt that all these
              Message 6 of 14 , Feb 2, 2004
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                > For dilution (cutting) of product to drinkable strength, use
                > distilled water only. Anything else will (at best) change the
                > flavour profile, or (at worst) introduce things into your body that
                > you might regret. Water distilled by reverse osmosis membrane
                > process is readily available at your supermarket in 1 to 15 litre
                > packages at very reasonable cost ($5 AUD here for 15 lt). Spring
                > water is not recommended as it contains too many dissolved
                > minerals/salts.
                >
                > HTH
                >
                > Slainte!
                > regards Harry


                Harry,

                You bring up a very interesting point...........the purity of water
                in Scottish Single Malts (or Whiskeys). I would doubt that all these
                distilleries are using R/O water in their process..........or are
                they? The naive tippler in me would think that each has their own
                peculiar well or spring they pull from, but that probably defies the
                amount they need to actually make production.

                Just curious.

                BS
              • vojeto
                Harry ... What do you reckon about rain water collected in remote areas - say like the rain water that is collected in that rainwater farm in FNQ (Mena Creek,
                Message 7 of 14 , Feb 3, 2004
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                  Harry

                  > For dilution (cutting) of product to drinkable strength, use
                  > distilled water only. Anything else will (at best) change the
                  > flavour profile, or (at worst) introduce things into your body that
                  > you might regret.

                  What do you reckon about rain water collected in remote areas - say
                  like the rain water that is collected in that rainwater farm in FNQ
                  (Mena Creek, near Mossman?). It ain't too dear in the supermarkets.

                  Cheers
                  JRae
                • whynda
                  ... Greetings all, Another source of chemically untainted water could possibly be the condensation drain that you see on a lot of air conditioning units, on
                  Message 8 of 14 , Feb 3, 2004
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                    > For dilution (cutting) of product to drinkable strength, use
                    > distilled water only. Anything else will (at best) change the
                    > flavour profile, or (at worst) introduce things into your body that
                    > you might regret. Water distilled by reverse osmosis membrane
                    > process is readily available at your supermarket in 1 to 15 litre
                    > packages at very reasonable cost ($5 AUD here for 15 lt). Spring
                    > water is not recommended as it contains too many dissolved
                    > minerals/salts.
                    >
                    > HTH
                    >
                    > Slainte!
                    > regards Harry

                    Greetings all,
                    Another source of chemically untainted water could possibly be the condensation drain that you see on a lot of air conditioning units, on the some of the bigger units it runs at a fair rate of knots so collecting it wouldn't take long at all and techically it is "distilled" water.

                    my two cents worth (plus GST)
                  • whynda
                    ... Greetings all, Methinks that rainwater whilst it may not be tainted with chemicals, probably has a fairly high bacteria count due to birds and other
                    Message 9 of 14 , Feb 3, 2004
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                      > What do you reckon about rain water collected in remote areas - say
                      > like the rain water that is collected in that rainwater farm in FNQ
                      > (Mena Creek, near Mossman?). It ain't too dear in the supermarkets.
                      >
                      > Cheers
                      > JRae


                      Greetings all,
                      Methinks that rainwater whilst it may not be tainted with chemicals,
                      probably has a fairly high bacteria count due to birds and other critters doing "stuff" on your roof or whatever collecting method you are using. Having said that, last year I was in Launceston and did a tour of the Boags brewery and was told that all the brew water comes from the North Esk River and the only treatment it receives is through a sand filter, if that's true it tased just fine to my buds.

                      my two cents worth (plus GST)
                    • Austin Smith
                      I ve got a Kenmore that seems to work very well. I ve run a brown sugar wash through it, as well as a gallon of table wine. I need to modify the still
                      Message 10 of 14 , Feb 3, 2004
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                        I've got a Kenmore that seems to work very well. I've run a brown sugar wash through it, as well as a gallon of table wine. I need to modify the still somewhat, to bypass the interlock on the receiving vessel. This interlock makes it somewhat iffy to remove heads.

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                      • Brain Solenoid
                        ... condensation drain that you see on a lot of air conditioning units, on the some of the bigger units it runs at a fair rate of knots so collecting it
                        Message 11 of 14 , Feb 3, 2004
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                          > Greetings all,
                          > Another source of chemically untainted water could possibly be the
                          condensation drain that you see on a lot of air conditioning units,
                          on the some of the bigger units it runs at a fair rate of knots so
                          collecting it wouldn't take long at all and techically it
                          is "distilled" water.
                          >
                          > my two cents worth (plus GST)


                          I'm not sure I would do that, myself. Here in the U.S. during the
                          1970's a lot of folks contracted a "mystery disease" at a Legionares
                          re-union on the east coast. Many of them, being very old and having
                          lower immune systems, died from this illness.

                          It was later found that this Legionares Disease, as it was dubbed,
                          was caused by a new breed of bacteria that had evolved to survive in
                          the swamp coolers used for air conditioning in larger buildings. I
                          believe it's a cousin to the Aspergillus (sp?) strains (one of
                          their "safe" varients creates Koji, which is used in Saki production).

                          Since air conditioning evaporator coils have all sorts of little
                          nooks and crannies, I would doubt that anything we could apply would
                          be able to sanitize it enough to make it safe.

                          I tried to distill my own water, albiet naively, thinking I would get
                          the chlorine and other gunk out of it. My water actually tasted
                          WORSE that when I started because I was condensing things that were
                          volatiles in the water (and garden hose) I was using.
                          I think when they distill water, they start with non-chlorinated and
                          filtered water.

                          Regards,
                          BS
                        • Austin Smith
                          The Kenmore will distill tap water into a pure, rainwater tasting, pure product. It does use a charcoal filter, however. I d also suggest not examining the
                          Message 12 of 14 , Feb 3, 2004
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                            The Kenmore will distill tap water into a pure, rainwater tasting, pure product. It does use a charcoal filter, however. I'd also suggest not examining the boiler too closely, lest you see what was in the water before it was distilled (mine looks like grey mud).

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