Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: [new_distillers] Re: Is the scale on my hydrometer correct?

Expand Messages
  • Rutger
    ... Not completely true. The amount of alcohol during fermentation is not very high, and it will not influence the measurement very much. You can do
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 28, 2003
      > ty for the answer. I now understand that the only time that you can
      > get an reliable mesurment is before any fermentation starts.

      Not completely true. The amount of alcohol during fermentation is not very
      high, and it will not influence the measurement very much. You can do
      measurements during fermentation to see how everything is going, but the
      lower the SG the more incorrect the measurement, but the max difference will
      be no more than about 10%.

      Rutger
    • Lee Fugatt
      I never learned to use mine rgat way while making wine cuz i just don t care that much about a couple of percentage points where taste is more important. So
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 28, 2003
        I never learned to use mine rgat way while making wine 'cuz i just don't
        care that much about a couple of percentage points where taste is more
        important. So I kind of went a different way.. I bought some 195proof raw
        graiin spirits and did a reading on a sample. Then added 10% water at a
        time to get control readings. Science often is not all that complex....
        specially when craft and art is the objective... . Lee
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Rutger" <rutgerr@...>
        To: <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, December 28, 2003 1:00 PM
        Subject: RE: [new_distillers] Re: Is the scale on my hydrometer correct?


        >
        > > ty for the answer. I now understand that the only time that you can
        > > get an reliable mesurment is before any fermentation starts.
        >
        > Not completely true. The amount of alcohol during fermentation is not very
        > high, and it will not influence the measurement very much. You can do
        > measurements during fermentation to see how everything is going, but the
        > lower the SG the more incorrect the measurement, but the max difference
        will
        > be no more than about 10%.
        >
        > Rutger
        >
        >
        >
        > New Distillers group archives are at http://archive.nnytech.net/
        > FAQ and other information available at http://homedistiller.org
        >
        > ttp://archive.nnytech.net/
        > FAQ and other information available at http://homedistiller.org
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        > To visit your group on the web, go to:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/new_distillers/
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > new_distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
        > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
      • gatesbox
        Sorry, some of the guys who have responded before me know far more than I. However, as a newbee I recall making many mistakes about using hydrometers for
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 28, 2003
          Sorry, some of the guys who have responded before me know far more
          than I. However, as a newbee I recall making many mistakes about
          using hydrometers for beer/wine and spirits. Are you looking for a
          finished %alch reading of spirit or are you just checking your
          fermenting batch? The beer/wine hydrometer works great for checking
          a finished fermentation which should reduce in number from 1.10+ to
          below 1.0 (correct my example?). A totally different hydrometer is
          needed for measuring %alc after distillation. Just wanted to make
          sure we were all on the same page this did not seem obvious as I
          started out.

          So starting with a higher specific gravity in the ferment and
          reducing to .999 shows that alchol has been produced in the
          fermentation process. The begining specific gravity (before
          fermentation) reading is a good estimate of the result alc% for
          beer/wine but depends on ingredients (am I right guys?). To measure
          at .99 is an end reading this is just a means for knowing your
          fermentation is done. I just wait for the bubbling to stop...

          Sorry if I read your question wrong, but it sounded like you were
          looking for a actual %alc reading, you need a seprate spirits
          hydrometer for this.
        • Mark Little
          I bought a hydrometer while away on holiday, 560 km to self brew store. It has specific gravity, potential alcohol, percent sugar. the question, Is 0% percent
          Message 4 of 9 , Dec 28, 2003
            I bought a hydrometer while away on holiday, 560 km to self
            brew store.
            It has specific gravity, potential alcohol, percent sugar.
            the question, Is 0% percent sugar and 0% potential alcohol
            supposed to
            be equal to 1.000 S.G.?
            If so how do you get the S.G. of .990 that I read about in
            posts?
            .990 = -1.25% potential alcohol
            ------------------------------------------------------------
            ---------------------------------------------
            The potential alcohol probably relates more to wine than
            spirits, wine will have more unfermentable sugars and most
            will stop at around 1.000 wheras spirit washes ( sugar
            based ) should ideally have no unfermentable sugars. The
            Potential scale is a guide when STARTING a wash/wine so that
            sugar can be added untill the potentil % of your yeast is
            reached. With wine you would soak the fruit in water to
            dissolve the sugars within the fruit , read the scale on the
            hydrometer relating to sugar per litre and then work out how
            much sugar to add to achieve the alc% you require, normally
            12 > 15 % for wine. A reading of .990 with 8kg of sugar in a
            25 L wash should yeild around 17 > 18%. If you record your
            SG before adding yeast ( after a THOROUGH stir ) then check
            again after fermenting, take the difference and divide by 7.
            36 ( have heard various figures but this seems to work out
            about right) this should give yourAPROX alcohol content E.G
            start at 1.090 (aprox 6 ks of sugar made up to
            25L)......end at .990 you have a difference of 100,
            100 divided by 7.36 gives aprox 13.5 % alc which is close
            to the 14% that many turbos claim

            Mark


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • w_upnorth
            TY all for the help the reason I was asking is that my wash had stuck for the second time. The first was the first night i started the wash (8 kg to 25 lt
            Message 5 of 9 , Dec 28, 2003
              TY all for the help
              the reason I was asking is that my wash had stuck for the second time.
              The first was the first night i started the wash (8 kg to 25 lt water
              with 8kg turbo) i decided that by following the directions and adding
              all the sugar at one time was the problem.
              My answer was red star active dry yeast from the store. I thought that
              if there was already nutrients in the wash from first turbo adding
              another turbo may turn product blue when distilled, and im cheep :).
              also I was hoping that some of the turbo yeast survived and would revive.
              Things were going good before I left for holiday. ( wash bubbling away
              . temp of wash was 79* f.
              while away i thought i would get a specific gravity hydrometer to
              check
              the finished wash for sugar because of my messed up start.
              Stall 2 was when I got home and my furnace had gone out.
              temp indoors was 36*f, temp of wash 54*f. I warmed up the wash in the
              bathtub to 60*f and got a S.G. of about 1.038. I then warmed it up to
              84*f and waited nothing much seamed to happen for about 20 hours
              but now there seems to be some action again, so I am hoping for a
              better S.G. # .
              If not should I distill this out and remix what is left to recover the
              sugar? or are there other options like add more water (to lower alc.
              content add sugar and repitch yeast).
            • Mark Little
              TY all for the help the reason I was asking is that my wash had stuck for the second time. The first was the first night i started the wash (8 kg to 25 lt
              Message 6 of 9 , Dec 28, 2003
                TY all for the help
                the reason I was asking is that my wash had stuck for the
                second time.
                The first was the first night i started the wash (8 kg to 25
                lt water
                with 8kg turbo) i decided that by following the directions
                and adding
                all the sugar at one time was the problem.
                My answer was red star active dry yeast from the store. I
                thought that
                if there was already nutrients in the wash from first turbo
                adding
                another turbo may turn product blue when distilled, and im
                cheep :).
                also I was hoping that some of the turbo yeast survived and
                would revive.
                Things were going good before I left for holiday. ( wash
                bubbling away
                . temp of wash was 79* f.
                while away i thought i would get a specific gravity
                hydrometer to
                check
                the finished wash for sugar because of my messed up start.
                Stall 2 was when I got home and my furnace had gone out.
                temp indoors was 36*f,(2.5C) temp of wash 54*f.(12C) I
                warmed up the wash in the
                bathtub to 60*f (16C) and got a S.G. of about 1.038.
                ........................................................

                I too have had this problem, not with adding the sugar ALL
                at first but with the heat dropping below 18C/65F when only
                1/2 to 3/4 of the way thru fermenting. Even after adding
                more heat the yeast was VERY sluggish, My assumption was
                that the alcohol allready produced had "pickled" the dormant
                yeast making it more or less useless even after reheating,
                perhaps too pissed to want to work any more :-)
                The initial sticking was more than likely due to too much
                heat either when the turbo was added or too much heat in the
                first 24 hours, the 8KG turbos will add LOTS of heat
                themselves in this time, I have had a barrel add 10C/50F to
                itself because the room was too warm. Personally I try and
                keep the 8KG Turbos UNDER 28C/82F and OVER 20C/68F. I
                have found the ideal ( STRESS my finding only) temp to
                add the Turbo is around 23C/75F when ambient room temp is
                around the same, start warmer in a cool room OR cooler in a
                warm room. WWW.stillspirits.com have some handy info sheets
                to download regarding Turbos.

                Mark
                ............................................................
                ............................................................
                ............................

                I then warmed it up to
                84*f and waited nothing much seamed to happen for about 20
                hours
                but now there seems to be some action again, so I am
                hoping for a
                better S.G. # .
                If not should I distill this out and remix what is left to
                recover the
                sugar? or are there other options like add more water (to
                lower alc.
                content add sugar and repitch yeast).



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.