Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

41278Re: Questions on Cassava (Manioc) starch mash

Expand Messages
  • JD
    Aug 18, 2011
      from : "brzdistiller" <brzdistiller@...>
      brzdistiller

      Thanks Wal,

      I´m aware of the cyanide in cassava. (that´s also why I thought about boiling it during the softening process)

      The variety I'm using is supposed to have much lower levels of cyanide than the Madioca Brava, commonly feared. Everyone here eats them fried all the time.

      I´m using cassava instead of sweet potatoes because cassava is free for me (my dad has it growing all over his place) and also for the challenge of making an actually tasty Tiquira.


      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
      >
      > Raw cassava releases hydrogen cyanide, which is present in some tiquiras. But cassava flour has been processed to remove this. The local tribes soak the crushed cassava in a river to remove the compounds.
      > Consider sweet potatoes which make a great spirit and just need heat to convert starches to sugars.
      > wal
      >
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "brzdistiller" <brzdistiller@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hey all, sorry it took a bit to reply. Thanks for the inputs.
      > >
      > > @ wal –Thanks a lot! the sweet potato trick was exactly what I was looking for! I found similar info but in a much more complicated way.
      > >
      > > @ BG – I wanted to try the blender process but cause i´m sure it will be much easier than grinding. The kind of cassava I have is pretty hard to grind by hand and will probably wear out a plastic food processor. I might reconsider it, because cleaning the still with the blended stuff will probably be a nightmare.
      > >
      > > @ peggy – where is that excerpt from? Nice info Thanks!
      > >
      > > One other think I might try in the future is using Farinha de mandioca – Dried powder like cassava.
      > >
      > >
      > > Thanks once again. I´ll keep you updated!
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Traditionally saliva enzymes were used.
      > > > If using commercial enzymes (from fungi) you need alpha-amylase and glucosidase.
      > > > Aspergillus oryzae will provide the necessary enzymes.
      > > >
      > > > To save money you can use the enzymes in raw grated sweet potatoes -
      > > >
      > > > http://tinyurl.com/4xt62rh
      > > >
      > > > wal
      > > >
      > > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "brzdistiller" <brzdistiller@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > I have a few questions concerning a Cassava (Manioc) starch mash.
      > > > >
      > > > > Tiquira is a liquor produced very rudimentary in the north of Brazil
      > > > > using Cassava as the source for sugar. Weird video in Portuguese:
      > > > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0gRffZOFj0
      > > > > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0gRffZOFj0>
      > > > >
      > > > > Tiquira is usually nasty stuff sold mostly for tourists as a souvenir
      > > > > in Maranhão (a state up north), but I bet much better results can be
      > > > > achieved.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > The cassava is usually grinded, cooked and fungus is used to convert the
      > > > > starch prior to fermentation.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > I wanted to go a different rout. My idea is to:
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > 1) Chop cassava w/ skin into smaller pieces.
      > > > >
      > > > > 2) Boil the cassava to soften it.
      > > > >
      > > > > 3) Blend the Cassava + fresh water in a 10L blender to increase the
      > > > > contact area.
      > > > >
      > > > > 4) Take this soup back to the fire and bring it to around 72C for it to
      > > > > "jellify"
      > > > >
      > > > > 5) Bring it to 60 to 65 C (or whatever the good temp is for the
      > > > > brewhaus alfa amyl enzyme). Add the Alpha Amylase enzymes and let it
      > > > > work for a few hours stirring occasionally.
      > > > >
      > > > > 6)Wait until cool and strain out fiber (I can tell it wont be easy).
      > > > >
      > > > > 7) Adjust water and add yeast or starter.
      > > > >
      > > > > 8) Leave it to ferment as usual.
      > > > >
      > > > > 9…) Add clearing agent, rack and Distill.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Do you thing only the Brewhaus Alpha Amylase will be enough for the
      > > > > conversion of the starch?
      > > > >
      > > > > (some sources suggest the use of Alpha-1,4 + Alpha-1,6 enzymes for
      > > > > better result -AMG 300L. Other sources also add pectin enzymes, or even
      > > > > do a second enzyme stage using amyloglucosidase enzyme).
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Is using a blender going to be a mistake? What do you think?
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > The grinded powder is said to contain about 200g of starch per kg, but
      > > > > concentrations vary immensely and rely on it being dry. Some sources
      > > > > suggest that the fresh root, as in my case, contains between 18-32% of
      > > > > starch.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > 21,1 kg of cassava + 78 L of water seems to result in a 15% starch mash.
      > > > > Can anyone suggest a starting recipe or have any other ideas for this
      > > > > mash?
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > I'm totally lost in translation with the info I have on hand. Any
      > > > > help is greatly appreciated.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Cheers,
      > > > >
      > > > > TH
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Show all 9 messages in this topic