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41253Re: Questions on Cassava (Manioc) starch mash

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  • waljaco
    Aug 9, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      See also -

      http://tinyurl.com/3lxp79k
      http://tinyurl.com/2vfe4

      wal

      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
      >
      > Traditionally saliva enzymes were used.
      > If using commercial enzymes (from fungi) you need alpha-amylase and glucosidase.
      > Aspergillus oryzae will provide the necessary enzymes.
      >
      > To save money you can use the enzymes in raw grated sweet potatoes -
      >
      > http://tinyurl.com/4xt62rh
      >
      > wal
      >
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "brzdistiller" <brzdistiller@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > I have a few questions concerning a Cassava (Manioc) starch mash.
      > >
      > > Tiquira is a liquor produced very rudimentary in the north of Brazil
      > > using Cassava as the source for sugar. Weird video in Portuguese:
      > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0gRffZOFj0
      > > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0gRffZOFj0>
      > >
      > > Tiquira is usually nasty stuff sold mostly for tourists as a souvenir
      > > in Maranhão (a state up north), but I bet much better results can be
      > > achieved.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > The cassava is usually grinded, cooked and fungus is used to convert the
      > > starch prior to fermentation.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > I wanted to go a different rout. My idea is to:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > 1) Chop cassava w/ skin into smaller pieces.
      > >
      > > 2) Boil the cassava to soften it.
      > >
      > > 3) Blend the Cassava + fresh water in a 10L blender to increase the
      > > contact area.
      > >
      > > 4) Take this soup back to the fire and bring it to around 72C for it to
      > > "jellify"
      > >
      > > 5) Bring it to 60 to 65 C (or whatever the good temp is for the
      > > brewhaus alfa amyl enzyme). Add the Alpha Amylase enzymes and let it
      > > work for a few hours stirring occasionally.
      > >
      > > 6)Wait until cool and strain out fiber (I can tell it wont be easy).
      > >
      > > 7) Adjust water and add yeast or starter.
      > >
      > > 8) Leave it to ferment as usual.
      > >
      > > 9…) Add clearing agent, rack and Distill.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Do you thing only the Brewhaus Alpha Amylase will be enough for the
      > > conversion of the starch?
      > >
      > > (some sources suggest the use of Alpha-1,4 + Alpha-1,6 enzymes for
      > > better result -AMG 300L. Other sources also add pectin enzymes, or even
      > > do a second enzyme stage using amyloglucosidase enzyme).
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Is using a blender going to be a mistake? What do you think?
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > The grinded powder is said to contain about 200g of starch per kg, but
      > > concentrations vary immensely and rely on it being dry. Some sources
      > > suggest that the fresh root, as in my case, contains between 18-32% of
      > > starch.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > 21,1 kg of cassava + 78 L of water seems to result in a 15% starch mash.
      > > Can anyone suggest a starting recipe or have any other ideas for this
      > > mash?
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > I'm totally lost in translation with the info I have on hand. Any
      > > help is greatly appreciated.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Cheers,
      > >
      > > TH
      > >
      >
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