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41252Re: [new_distillers] Questions on Cassava (Manioc) starch mash

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  • Don Ford
    Aug 9, 2011
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      Why not just process it similar to film, then dry in oven (or sun dry) into a dry meal.  After the meal is dry, just add water, covert like any grain, cool and pitch yeast, then distill.

      BG


      At 12:12 AM 8/9/2011, you wrote:
       

      I have a few questions concerning a Cassava (Manioc) starch mash.

       Tiquira is a liquor produced very rudimentary in the north of Brazil using Cassava as the source for sugar. Weird video in Portuguese: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0gRffZOFj0

       Tiquira is usually nasty stuff sold mostly for tourists as a souvenir in Maranhão (a state up north), but I bet much better results can be achieved.

       

      The cassava is usually grinded, cooked and fungus is used to convert the starch prior to fermentation.

       

       I wanted to go a different rout. My idea is to:

       

      1) Chop cassava w/ skin into smaller pieces.

      2) Boil the cassava to soften it.

      3) Blend the Cassava + fresh water in a 10L blender to increase the contact area.

      4) Take this soup back to the fire and bring it to around  72C for it to "jellify"

      5) Bring it  to 60 to 65 C (or whatever the good temp is for the brewhaus alfa amyl enzyme). Add the Alpha Amylase enzymes and let it work for a few hours stirring occasionally.

      6)Wait until cool and strain out fiber (I can tell it wont be easy).

      7) Adjust water and add yeast or starter.

      8) Leave it to ferment as usual.

      9…) Add clearing agent, rack and Distill.

       

      Do you thing only the Brewhaus Alpha Amylase will be enough for the conversion of the starch?

      (some sources suggest the use of Alpha-1,4 + Alpha-1,6 enzymes for better result -AMG 300L. Other sources also add pectin enzymes, or even do a second enzyme stage using amyloglucosidase enzyme).

       

      Is using a blender going to be a mistake? What do you think?

       

      The grinded powder is said to contain about 200g of starch per kg, but concentrations vary immensely and rely on it being dry. Some sources suggest that the fresh root, as in my case, contains between 18-32% of starch.

       

      21,1 kg of cassava + 78 L of water seems to result in a 15% starch mash. Can anyone suggest a starting recipe or have any other ideas for this mash?

       

      I'm totally lost in translation with the info I have on hand. Any help is greatly appreciated.


      Cheers,

      TH
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