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36458Re: Cognac Grapes...

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  • jamesonbeam1
    Aug 2, 2009
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      Yuppers Baker,

      Well aware that the Sultanas and the Thompson's seedless rasins are one in the same - when the Sultanas are dried, they are indeed called "raisins.;)

      "The sultana grape is cultivated in the United States under the name Thompson Seedless, named after William Thompson, a viticulturist who was an early grower in California and is sometimes credited with the variety's introduction.[4][5] According to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, the two names are synonymous.[6] Virtually all of California raisin production (approximately 97% in 2000) and roughly one-third of California's total grape area is of this variety, making it the single most widely-planted variety.[7][5] 

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)

      But again, Thompson's seedless raisins are widely used in many fruit wine (not grape wines lol) recipes that I have seen.

      Vino es Veritas,

      Jim aka Waldo.


      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gff_stwrt" <gff_stwrt@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi,Jim and hello folks,
      > Just to be sure there is no misunderstanding; the sultana and the Thompson's seedless are exactly the same fruit.
      > But it might or might not be more correct to call the Thompson's seedless a RAISIN after it has been dried.
      > Anyway they taste great but I was astonished at the size the first time I saw the treated ones for sale as fresh fruit.
      >
      > Regards,
      >
      > The Baker
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" jamesonbeam1@ wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > Hey Baker,
      > >
      > > While the Sultanas grapes might not be good for making wine by
      > > themselves, I've used Thompson's seeedless raisins in many of my wine
      > > recipes, including apple, blackberry and peach. Has something to do
      > > with the added nutrients, flavor and sweetness.
      > >
      > > Jack Keller in his "The Winemaking Home Page" also recommends them in
      > > many of his recipes as well.
      > >
      > > Vino es Veritas,
      > >
      > > Jim aka Waldo.

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