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35955Re: Grains in whiskey

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  • vodkaman1976
    Jul 1, 2009
      Excellent breakdown Zymurgy Bob, very helpful and informative. This info is gonna really help me out. I have two keg boilers and 2 propane burners, so I could get the corn and the barley going at the same time. I'm ready to tackle this new challenge, but gotta wait now till the Alpha Amylase Enzyme gets delivered. Another question is, Do I really need to be aware of my ph level when going all-grain? I have heard some others talking about the iodine test and a digital ph meter.


      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
      >
      > Vodkaman,
      >
      > Jim is right on about using enzymes with your unmalted grain, and Mason uses the BA-100 and GA-100 to great effect.
      >
      > I just use Crosby and Baker Amylase Enzyme Formula, available at my LHBS, to convert my grain starches for whiskey. I have no doubt that Mason's enzymes work better, but mine converts starches pretty well, and makes a great-tasting wash and whiskey, and I've got enough to last me another year.
      >
      > While the "recipe" (grain bill, really) is up to you and your tastes, all you have to do is prepare the grains such that the starch is available to be converted to sugars by the enzymes.
      >
      > For milled brewers barley, all you need to do is to heat the barley and water to 152F of 67C, hot enough for the enzymes to react fairly quickly, but not so hot as to denature (kill) the enzymes. Let the barley, enzymes, and water stand, with the brewkettle insulated, for about 90 minutes, and the barley starches are converted.
      >
      > For flakes or "Torrefied" grains, the starches are already gelatinized and available, so again heat water and grain to 152F and add the enzymes. Let stand also for 90 minutes.
      >
      > Whole dry corn is another matter entirely. Corn must be cracked, and hot water must be added to gelatinize the corn starch. I add boiling water to the cracked corn, add heat with *lots* of stirring to raise the temperature to boiling again, insulate, and let stand 90 minutes. Note that this time, I have not added enzymes yet, because the high temperatures would kill them. After 90 minutes, cool the corn mash to 152F and add enzymes. Cover, insulate, and let stand *another* 90 minutes to convert the starches.
      >
      > Because whiskeys require so much work and low-abv washes to get much product, and because most brewkettles don't hold enough wash to make much whiskey, consider preparing and converting your grains in multiple brewkettle-sized batches, cooling them to yeast-pitching temperatures, and throwing them (sequentially) into a much larger container (I use a 55-gallon malt-extract drum) to ferment.
      >
      > IN that way you can do all the corn in all-corn batches, all the wheat in all-wheat batches, and so on.
      >
      > I hope this helps
      >
      > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > Since you have all this cracked barley, theres no reason to try getting
      > > malted grains for it. Why not ask Mason about the BA-100 and GA-100
      > > enzymes you can get from
      > > www.milehidistilling.com/Alpha_Amylase_Enzyme_1_Pound_p/13215.htm
      > > <http://www.milehidistilling.com/Alpha_Amylase_Enzyme_1_Pound_p/13215.ht\
      > > m>
      > >
      > > He has had great sucess with these and should make a nice whiskey or a
      > > nice bourbon with the rye, barley and corn if you want to go to an all
      > > grain mash. Just remember - real Bourbon and American (Tennessee) Corn
      > > Whiskey needs at least 51% corn grains.
      > >
      > > Vino es Veritas,
      > >
      > > Jim aka Waldo.
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "vodkaman1976" <vodkaman1976@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > I recently had a friend of mine give me 150lb of cracked barley(not
      > > malted). If I were to go an all grain route instead of the UJSSM that
      > > i've been doing lately, could I use this stuff? I was unsure because of
      > > the fact that it is un-malted. Was wanting to shoot for a 10 gallon mash
      > > and I thought 5lb cracked corn, a pound of rye flour, 10lbs sugar but
      > > unsure about barley maybe 5lbs? Being that it is un-malted would I just
      > > have to boil it longer or is it useless?
      > > >
      > >
      >
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