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25379Re: Corn Whiskey Recipes

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  • Rob
    Nov 24, 2007
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      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tarvus" <tarvus33991@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Rob" <robobline@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello all,
      > > Would anyone care to share a good corn recipe with me/us? I
      > would
      > > like to make a all corn/malt mash without using suger. I would
      be
      > > using a 15 gallon boiler. If anyone would like to share a great
      > > recipe, I'm all ears.
      > > Thanks, Rob
      >
      > Hey Rob,
      >
      > I've done a number of pure corn mashes.
      >
      > #1 - the hard way...
      > In the past, I've used 80% cracked corn and 20% 6-row barley
      malt.
      > Mashing cracked corn (even with barley malt) is a pain. (Same
      thing
      > if you substitute corn meal for cracked corn.) It's actually a 2
      > step process. You have to add a portion of the barley malt to the
      > corn (about 1/4 of your malt)and mash it prior to boiling it to
      > gelatinize the corn. Add a pint of water per pound of grain at a
      > temp 18F above your planned strike temp. Shoot for a 150F mash
      temp
      > and mash for at least 1/2 hour. This will only partially convert
      > your corn but will loosen up the corn enough that it won't become
      a
      > thick viscous lump of cereal when you boil it. (And you have to
      > boil it to gelatinize it).
      >
      > After 1/2 hour of mashing, add another cup per pound of boiling
      > water and ramp up the flame under the kettle until the whole mash
      is
      > boiling. Boil for an hour or so to totally gelatinize the corn.
      > Add a final cup per pound of COLD water. Allow the whole thing to
      > cool down to about 155F (this will take a LONG time depending on
      the
      > size of your mash) then add the rest of the barley malt. This
      will
      > drop the entire mash temp to about 148 - 150F. Stir in the
      recently
      > added 6 row malt and let it steep. When the whole thing cools
      down
      > to room temp (hours later), transfer to your fermenter and pitch
      > your yeast( I use a new, 32 gallon plastic garbage can sanitized
      > with bleach and water and thoroughly rinsed.) Don't worry about
      > straining the grain out - just dump it all in the fermenter.
      > Ferment it "on the grain".
      >
      > If you use an electric heating element you'll have to strain the
      > mash before distilling. This is a real pain in the ass. Good
      > luck! If you are lucky enough to be using a propane or natural
      gas
      > heat source, it is not necessary to strain it - just add the wash
      to
      > your boiler to distill - grain hulls and all. If distilling "on
      the
      > grain" do NOT fill the boiler more than 1/2 full of mash! You
      have
      > to be very careful that the grain in the mash does not swell up
      and
      > plug the column or lyne arm of your still or you risk explosion
      from
      > resulting pressure increase in your boiler! (This almost happened
      > to me the first time I over-filled and ran a corn mash in my
      boiler).
      >
      > #2 - the "easy way"...
      > Buy corn flour from the grocery store (it's easy to find and quite
      > inexpensive. I pay $1.89 US per kilo. They sell it for making
      corn
      > tortillas). Use a 50% corn flour mash with 50% corn malt, or an
      80%
      > corn flour 20% 6-row barley malt mash. No need to boil this mash
      > because the corn flour is already gelatinized from the milling.
      > Mash at 148 - 150F for an hour or two. Cool to room temp and
      pitch
      > your yeast. Virtually all of the corn flour will convert and
      you'll
      > just have a very few barley or corn husks in the mash from the
      > malt. No need to strain if you're careful pouring the mash from
      > your fermenter.
      >
      > Use your favorite yeast and favorite distilling technique. Age on
      > oak at 125 proof for a really smooth bourbon-like result!
      >
      > The #1 method is inexpensive but time consuming. The #2 method is
      a
      > bit more expensive but MUCH easier and a lot less time comsuming.
      >
      > Good luck and let us know how your hooch turns out! :)
      >
      > Tarvus
      > ps - will post separately my techniques for malting, drying and
      > grinding corn.
      >
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