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22461Re: Advantage of tall column

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  • Harry
    Nov 1, 2006
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      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tyler_97355" <kd7enm@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > ok, so a 2" column "flooding" around 3kw is like my 1/2"
      > liebig "choking" at 1.5kw when i tried to us it as a verticle
      reflux
      > condenser, right? Too much liquid being condensed and staying in
      the
      > packing, which would impeed the vapor flow, and preasurize the
      still,
      > if i understand correctly. Which brings up another question. If
      your
      > info is correct, that a 2" column will flood if given a heat input
      > over 2-3kw, why is it that the PDA-2 will handle a max power input
      of
      > 5.5kw? If i remember correctly, it is constucted with 2" pipe.





      ...........It's not 2" pipe. I can't remember which it is, either
      it's 3" or 4", but definitely not 2".



      >
      > Once again, to make sure that i get the entirely clear definition
      of
      > HETP, the HETP is the height of packing that it takes to equal one
      > theoretical plate for the given tamperature, for that type of
      > packing?




      .............AND that particular heat input.


      So, lets say, if the HETP for my still and its packing was 8
      > inches for each plate, if i increased my heat input, it might
      require
      > 12 inches for each plate.


      .......Yes.


      I know that the measurements are not
      > correct, i am just wondering if i have the general idea down.


      ..Yes.



      >
      > I do wonder, how does one aquire this knowledge? Does it take
      years
      > of engineering school,





      ......The discipline is known as "Chemical Engineering" ChE for
      short.


      or is it just a matter of knowing the right
      > equations?



      ........ You can be 'self-taught' if you have a capacity to learn.
      The information is available in any library and in many places on
      the internet. I am self taught when it comes to physics,
      electrical, mechanical & chemical engineering. My degrees are in
      computing and Information Technology. But that doesn't stop me from
      acquiring the knowledge I need to assist me in my chosen hobby.
      Bottom line is, if you have a desire to learn, and a capable brain,
      then the sky's the limit. Age is no barrier.

      Side note for Riku: There are formulae for working out HETP.
      They're called McCabe-Theile Diagrams, phase diagrams, and for the
      lazy ones, computer simulations such as HYSIS . But you need to get
      a lot more theory & prac under your belt (distillation-wise) before
      you tackle that level. The 'net is your fingertip library. ;-)


      I'm sorry if i am really slow with catching on to some of
      > the theory here, but thats why i'm in the "new distillers" forum,
      and
      > i really appreciate all of your help.


      .......Look on Tony's homedistiller.org homesite (homepage of this
      group). That will give you a jump-start to the theory.



      Someday, i want you all to be
      > able to look back at me and say, "my god, what have we done!"
      >
      > -Tyler
      >


      Slainte!
      regards Harry
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