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AI-GEOSTATS: tick sampling

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  • Russell Barbour
    Dear All, I am trying to fiugre out how many locations I need for a sample of ticks in the eastern United States. I know that teh rule of thumb is that that no
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 24, 2003
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      Dear All,

      I am trying to fiugre out how many locations I need for a sample of ticks in
      the eastern United States. I know that teh rule of thumb is that that no less
      than twenty pairs are required per distance class, but is there any other
      refrence on sampling for spatial analysis?

      Thank you
      Russell Barbour Ph.D.
      Research Associate in Applied Mathematics
      Vector Ecology Laboratory
      Yale School of Medicine
      60 College St. Rm 600
      New Haven CT. 06520
      TEL: 203 785 2394
      FAX 203 785 3604
      email: russell.barbour@...




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    • Dean Monroe
      Russell: I have also been struggling trying to find references on sampling, specifically sample size. The best two that I have found are Geostatistical Error
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 27, 2003
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        Russell:

        I have also been struggling trying to find references on sampling, specifically sample size. The best two that I have found are "Geostatistical Error Measurement" Myers (1997) and "Geostatistics for Environmental Scientists" Webster and Oliver (2001). Webster and Oliver (2001) commit to a n=50 "rule of thumb", granted that is not a hard and fast rule. They specifically comment on experimental design in this book. The best luck I have had is to approach the problem from a simulation point of view, in that, I have simulated the distribution of distance pairs and took enough samples to make the distance distribution uniform, this is of course using stratified random sampling. The simulation is to find the density of points for a bounded area, this is a process of back-engineering sample size.

        Hope this helps

        Best,
        Dean Monroe
        Oklahoma State University
        Environmental Sciences



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