Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Distilling Beer

Expand Messages
  • an_it_chick
    Hi there In South Africa craft beer has taken off with a storm, so there are often a batch or two that is just not drinkable. Between ourselves and friends we
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 14, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi there
      In South Africa craft beer has taken off with a storm, so there are often a batch or two that is just not drinkable. Between ourselves and friends we ended up with 3 such batches and instead of throwing it down the drain, we distilled it. The first batch was an American Pale Ale with a sweet tasting end result - doesn't seem to be too high in alcohol content, the Blonde ale is a lot less sweet and the IPA has an oily taste (from the hops) and seems to be extremely strong.
      My questions are:
      1) Is there a different way of distilling beer?
      2) How do I calculate the amount of alcohol in the end result? The beer all had an alcohol level of 4.5 %  Blonde, 6% APA and 8% IPA.
      3) Should we distill it again to get rid of the oily taste?
      It can be done. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLY8E7iSZYc
      Any suggestions or help will be appreciated since we can often have a batch of beer to distill!!
    • Robert Hubble
      Although there is a spirit distilled from hopped beer (in Germany it s called bierschnapps), it s evidently an acquired taste, one that I ve never acquired,
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 15, 2014
      • 0 Attachment
        Although there is a spirit distilled from hopped beer (in Germany it's called "bierschnapps), it's evidently an acquired taste, one that I've never acquired, at least yet. Most people just don't like it, especially if the beer distilled is heavily hopped, specifically like an IPA.

        Depending on your distilled hops revulsion threshhold, that second distillation may not make the spirit taste good.

        I've distilled several beers with wildly varied results, from a hop-bomb seasonal that my hop-head some made (probably unpleasant similar to your "oily" spirit) to an extract with steeped specialty grains that was one of the best white dog whiskeys I've ever tasted. Because it was for a class I taught, everyone went home with their part of the cut-and-blended whiskey, so I never found out how it aged.

        As for question 1, different from what? A nice unhopped beer potstills just like any other low-to-medium % wash.

        For question #2, I don't calculate the % ethanol in the final results, I make the final results what I want. If you are familiar with the concept of "making the cuts", you will collect the stills output in several small samples, which will start at alcohol concentrations higher that what you want to drink, and end at something lower. By taste and smell, you pick those fractions that taste great to you, mix them, and then dilute to whatever drinking strength you desire.

        For more on making cuts:
        http://www.kelleybarts.com/PhotoXfer/ReadMeFirst/MakingTheCuts.html

        Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        From: an_it_chick@...
        Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 22:01:13 -0700
        Subject: [new_distillers] Distilling Beer

         
        Hi there
        In South Africa craft beer has taken off with a storm, so there are often a batch or two that is just not drinkable. Between ourselves and friends we ended up with 3 such batches and instead of throwing it down the drain, we distilled it. The first batch was an American Pale Ale with a sweet tasting end result - doesn't seem to be too high in alcohol content, the Blonde ale is a lot less sweet and the IPA has an oily taste (from the hops) and seems to be extremely strong.
        My questions are:
        1) Is there a different way of distilling beer?
        2) How do I calculate the amount of alcohol in the end result? The beer all had an alcohol level of 4.5 %  Blonde, 6% APA and 8% IPA.
        3) Should we distill it again to get rid of the oily taste?
        It can be done. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLY8E7iSZYc
        Any suggestions or help will be appreciated since we can often have a batch of beer to distill!!
      • LB Low
        I managed to get hold of an acoholmter and though I don t think it is 100% accurate it gave me an indication of what the alcohol levels are. The Blonde beer
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 18, 2014
        • 0 Attachment
          I managed to get hold of an acoholmter and though I don't think it is 100% accurate it gave me an indication of what the alcohol levels are.
          The Blonde beer started off at 35%, bottle #2 25% and #3 20%.
          The IPA started at 40%, #2 35% but then jumped to 25% on #3.
          I will distill the last of the batch beer in order to have enough fluid to distill again.
          Can I add distillers yeast and sugar to the undistilled beer in order to boost the alcohol levels?
          On Tuesday, April 15, 2014 6:43 PM, Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...> wrote:


          Although there is a spirit distilled from hopped beer (in Germany it's called "bierschnapps), it's evidently an acquired taste, one that I've never acquired, at least yet. Most people just don't like it, especially if the beer distilled is heavily hopped, specifically like an IPA.

          Depending on your distilled hops revulsion threshhold, that second distillation may not make the spirit taste good.

          I've distilled several beers with wildly varied results, from a hop-bomb seasonal that my hop-head some made (probably unpleasant similar to your "oily" spirit) to an extract with steeped specialty grains that was one of the best white dog whiskeys I've ever tasted. Because it was for a class I taught, everyone went home with their part of the cut-and-blended whiskey, so I never found out how it aged.

          As for question 1, different from what? A nice unhopped beer potstills just like any other low-to-medium % wash.

          For question #2, I don't calculate the % ethanol in the final results, I make the final results what I want. If you are familiar with the concept of "making the cuts", you will collect the stills output in several small samples, which will start at alcohol concentrations higher that what you want to drink, and end at something lower. By taste and smell, you pick those fractions that taste great to you, mix them, and then dilute to whatever drinking strength you desire.

          For more on making cuts:
          http://www.kelleybarts.com/PhotoXfer/ReadMeFirst/MakingTheCuts.html

          Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


          To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
          From: an_it_chick@...
          Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 22:01:13 -0700
          Subject: [new_distillers] Distilling Beer

           
          Hi there
          In South Africa craft beer has taken off with a storm, so there are often a batch or two that is just not drinkable. Between ourselves and friends we ended up with 3 such batches and instead of throwing it down the drain, we distilled it. The first batch was an American Pale Ale with a sweet tasting end result - doesn't seem to be too high in alcohol content, the Blonde ale is a lot less sweet and the IPA has an oily taste (from the hops) and seems to be extremely strong.
          My questions are:
          1) Is there a different way of distilling beer?
          2) How do I calculate the amount of alcohol in the end result? The beer all had an alcohol level of 4.5 %  Blonde, 6% APA and 8% IPA.
          3) Should we distill it again to get rid of the oily taste?
          It can be done. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLY8E7iSZYc
          Any suggestions or help will be appreciated since we can often have a batch of beer to distill!!




        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.