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Re: Book read a month?

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  • captcaffeine2004
    ... Wodehouse, and I ve read about thirty or so of his hilarious books. I get a kick out of knowing that he and Stout were such mutual admirers. Wodehouse
    Message 1 of 26 , May 1, 2006
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      --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, Joe Suggs <jdsuggs@...> wrote:
      >
      > About the same time I started on Rex Stout, I started on P.G.
      Wodehouse, and I've read about thirty or so of his hilarious books.
      I get a kick out of knowing that he and Stout were such mutual
      admirers. Wodehouse refers to detective fiction pretty frequently,
      and on a few occasions I think he's taking a friendly shot at his
      esteemed colleague- I think one of his characters had it "easier than
      a New York detective writer", etc.
      >
      > Right now I'm finishing Very Good, Jeeves- a great collection of
      early short stories with Jeeves and Wooster. After that I'll
      probably tackle another Wodehouse or Love and Hate In Jamestown by
      David A. Price, which has been loaned and recommended to me. Joe
      > ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''

      Hello Joe: I've been wanting to start reading Wodehouse's Jeeves
      series for a long time but I have been wondering where to start. Is
      the first book "My Man Jeeves" (1919)? Is that a collection? (Asking
      since a B & N store nearby always has a bunch of Jeeves books, but
      never seems to have that one.) Should they be read in order? Is
      there anything on the net as public domain? Input appreciated. Take
      care.
      Vinny in Texas
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls.
      Great rates starting at 1¢/min.
      >
    • stubbsflugel
      Being diabled from Crohn s Disease and a liver transplant .... I spend a lot of time at the Cleveland Clinic and polish off four Rex works a month. I m
      Message 2 of 26 , May 1, 2006
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        Being diabled from Crohn's Disease and a liver transplant .... I spend
        a lot of time at the Cleveland Clinic and polish off four Rex works a
        month. I'm careful to not read too many in a row as it would be a
        horrible fate to be burned out on my heros! I try to really mix it up
        and occasionally learn some new things while reading. I just
        finished "Burn This Book Before Reading" by Admiral Stansfield
        Turner, "Bushworld" by Maureen Dowd, 1960 Comet Repair Manual (my
        tooling around town car) , and |"The Slang Of Sin" by Tom Dalzell.
        Please don't judge me by my seamy choice of literature ;)

        Words to live by: "Fake for the window and dive for the door!"
        Flashman At The Charge.
      • stubbsflugel
        Sorry for the misrable spelling . Watching the Red Wings loose their shot at the Stanley Cup and didn t spell check!
        Message 3 of 26 , May 1, 2006
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          Sorry for the misrable spelling . Watching the Red Wings loose their
          shot at the Stanley Cup and didn't spell check!
        • Joe Suggs
          ...Fall in anywhere you can and don t look back. Wodehouse s stuff is uniformly great, but one of the charms of the Jeeves and Wooster series is that Bertie- a
          Message 4 of 26 , May 1, 2006
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            ...Fall in anywhere you can and don't look back. Wodehouse's stuff is uniformly great, but one of the charms of the Jeeves and Wooster series is that Bertie- a narrator who's actually as entertaining as Archie- will remind you repeatedly of landmark stage-setting things that happened in the past, with a minimum of actual spoilers. 

            An example: Bertie (who's almost as trenchant and acidic as Basil Fawlty) cannot forgive the attractive Madeline Bassett, to whom he repeatedly becomes engaged through misunderstandings, for having once observed that "the stars are God's daisy chain."  In context, this just gets funnier every time he brings it up and rehashes the horror of it. We are also reminded repeatedly that her father, the magistrate Sir Watkyn Bassett, once fined Bertie five pounds for stealing a policeman's helmet on Boat race night, and the relationship continues to decline from there.  With great difficulties, Bertie's brilliant gentleman's personal gentleman Jeeves keeps him out of the magistrate's clutches and saves him from the machinations of his various aunts.

            It can't hurt just to start at the peak like I did and discover the rest: Code Of The Woosters is the acknowledged masterpiece and is the funniest book written in the English language; Right Ho, Jeeves is close behind.  They're both laughing out loud every sentence funny.  The short stuff is absolutely great, too, but you'll hit the ground running with his tours-de-force from the mid-thirties.

            Reading them in order is very non-essential. Wodehouse basically tells the same story, or at least type of story, over and over but manages to ring completely fresh entertainment from it every time. It's not where they're going, it's how they get there.

            Other major series of Wodehouse include the Blandings Castle stories, the Mulliner stories, the golf stories (which, surprisingly, are greatly entertaining whether or not you care a thing about golf), and the Ukridge and Psmith stories, among others, and he wrote plenty of one-offs and one-time spinoffs as well.

            Don't waste another day! Dig in now, and take the phone off the hook.

            Joe



            captcaffeine2004 <captcaffeine2004@...> wrote:
            --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, Joe Suggs <jdsuggs@...> wrote:
            >
            > About the same time I started on Rex Stout, I started on P.G.
            Wodehouse, and I've read about thirty or so of his hilarious books. 
            I get a kick out of knowing that he and Stout were such mutual
            admirers.  Wodehouse refers to detective fiction pretty frequently,
            and on a few occasions I think he's taking a friendly shot at his
            esteemed colleague- I think one of his characters had it "easier than
            a New York detective writer", etc.
            >
            > Right now I'm finishing Very Good, Jeeves- a great collection of
            early short stories with Jeeves and Wooster.  After that I'll
            probably tackle another Wodehouse or Love and Hate In Jamestown by
            David A. Price, which has been loaned and recommended to me.   Joe
            > ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
                                                                                 
              Hello Joe:  I've been wanting to start reading Wodehouse's Jeeves
            series for a long time but I have been wondering where to start.  Is
            the first book "My Man Jeeves" (1919)?  Is that a collection? (Asking
            since a B & N store nearby always has a bunch of Jeeves books, but
            never seems to have that one.) Should they be read in order?  Is
            there anything on the net as public domain?  Input appreciated.  Take
            care.
                  Vinny in Texas  
            >
            >            
            >
            >        
            >                                                     > > 
            >    
            >      
            >
            >            
            > ---------------------------------
            > Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls. 
            Great rates starting at 1&cent;/min.
            >






            Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. PC-to-Phone calls for ridiculously low rates.

          • Alix Feldman
            HI there to all, Im new to the group and am also a devout Rex Stout fan. I also have been wanting to start the Jeeves series since seeing it on PBS. What is
            Message 5 of 26 , May 10, 2006
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              HI there to all, Im new to the group and am also a devout Rex Stout fan.
               
              I also have been wanting to start the Jeeves series since seeing it on PBS.
               
              What is the best one to start with ?


              captcaffeine2004 <captcaffeine2004@...> wrote:
              --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, Joe Suggs <jdsuggs@...> wrote:
              >
              > About the same time I started on Rex Stout, I started on P.G.
              Wodehouse, and I've read about thirty or so of his hilarious books. 
              I get a kick out of knowing that he and Stout were such mutual
              admirers.  Wodehouse refers to detective fiction pretty frequently,
              and on a few occasions I think he's taking a friendly shot at his
              esteemed colleague- I think one of his characters had it "easier than
              a New York detective writer", etc.
              >
              > Right now I'm finishing Very Good, Jeeves- a great collection of
              early short stories with Jeeves and Wooster.  After that I'll
              probably tackle another Wodehouse or Love and Hate In Jamestown by
              David A. Price, which has been loaned and recommended to me.   Joe
              > ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
                                                                                   
                Hello Joe:  I've been wanting to start reading Wodehouse's Jeeves
              series for a long time but I have been wondering where to start.  Is
              the first book "My Man Jeeves" (1919)?  Is that a collection? (Asking
              since a B & N store nearby always has a bunch of Jeeves books, but
              never seems to have that one.) Should they be read in order?  Is
              there anything on the net as public domain?  Input appreciated.  Take
              care.
                    Vinny in Texas  
              >
              >            
              >
              >        
              >                                                     > > 
              >    
              >      
              >
              >            
              > ---------------------------------
              > Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls. 
              Great rates starting at 1&cent;/min.
              >






              Yahoo! Mail goes everywhere you do. Get it on your phone.

            • fredewardus
              ... Rex Stout fan. ... it on PBS. ... Fred : I first got interested in Wolfe via the TV series . the show was The Doorbell Rang Then , I went for the
              Message 6 of 26 , May 10, 2006
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                --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, Alix Feldman <alixforwheels@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > HI there to all, Im new to the group and am also a devout
                Rex Stout fan.
                >
                > I also have been wanting to start the Jeeves series since seeing
                it on PBS.
                >
                > What is the best one to start with ?

                Fred :
                I first got interested in Wolfe via the TV series . the show was
                " The Doorbell Rang " Then , I went for the books , I started with ,
                and recommend to you , the first one Stout wrote : " FER-DE-LANCE " .
                ( I just started reading it again for the third time . )
                Ya just can't go wrong Alix , no matter what one you select . :-)







                >
                >
                >
                > captcaffeine2004 <captcaffeine2004@...> wrote: --- In
                nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, Joe Suggs <jdsuggs@> wrote:
                > >
                > > About the same time I started on Rex Stout, I started on P.G.
                > Wodehouse, and I've read about thirty or so of his hilarious
                books.
                > I get a kick out of knowing that he and Stout were such mutual
                > admirers. Wodehouse refers to detective fiction pretty frequently,
                > and on a few occasions I think he's taking a friendly shot at his
                > esteemed colleague- I think one of his characters had it "easier
                than
                > a New York detective writer", etc.
                > >
                > > Right now I'm finishing Very Good, Jeeves- a great collection of
                > early short stories with Jeeves and Wooster. After that I'll
                > probably tackle another Wodehouse or Love and Hate In Jamestown by
                > David A. Price, which has been loaned and recommended to me. Joe
                >
                > ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
                >

                > Hello Joe: I've been wanting to start reading Wodehouse's Jeeves
                > series for a long time but I have been wondering where to start.
                Is
                > the first book "My Man Jeeves" (1919)? Is that a collection?
                (Asking
                > since a B & N store nearby always has a bunch of Jeeves books, but
                > never seems to have that one.) Should they be read in order? Is
                > there anything on the net as public domain? Input appreciated.
                Take
                > care.
                > Vinny in Texas
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ---------------------------------
                > > Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls.
                > Great rates starting at 1¢/min.
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
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              • Joe Suggs
                Alix, if you ll scroll back to May 2, I replied to this same question by Vinny from Texas, but the substance of it was this: jump in anywhere. Reading Jeeves
                Message 7 of 26 , May 10, 2006
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                  Alix, if you'll scroll back to May 2, I replied to this same question by Vinny from Texas, but the substance of it was this: jump in anywhere.  Reading Jeeves and Wooster in order is even less essential than reading Wolfe in order (his Blandings novels are another matter, though).  I started with Code Of the Woosters (1938), the funniest book ever written.  On page 106, Bertie neatly summarizes the most deranged plot I've ever read in a position paper dictated to Jeeves:

                  'Take pencil and paper, Jeeves, and we will assemble the facts.  Entitle the thing "Wooster, B.- position of." Ready?'

                  'Yes, sir.'

                  'Right.  Now then.  Item One- Aunt Dahlia says that if I don't pinch that cow-creamer and hand it over to her, she will bar me from her table, and no more of Anatole's cooking.'

                  'Yes, sir.'

                  'We now come to Item Two-viz., if I do pinch the cow-creamer and hand it over to her, Spode will beat me to a jelly.'

                  'Yes, sir.'

                  'Furthermore- Item Three- if I pinch it and hand it over to her and don't pinch it and hand it over to Harold Pinker, not only shall I undergo the jellying process alluded to above, but Stiffy will take that notebook of Gussie's and hand it over to Sir Watkyn Bassett.  And you and I know what the result of that would be.  Well, there you are.  That's the set-up.  You've got it?'

                  'Yes, sir.  It is certainly a somewhat unfortunate state of affairs.'

                  I gave him one of my looks.

                  'Jeeves', I said, "don't try me too high.  Not at a moment like this.'

                  The Spode alluded to is Roderick Spode, oversized aspiring dictator, founder of the London fascist group the Black Shorts (they had run out of shirts) and described by Bertie this way: "It was as if Nature had intended to make a gorilla and had changed its mind at the last moment."

                  What are you waiting for?

                  Joe




                  Alix Feldman <alixforwheels@...> wrote:
                  HI there to all, Im new to the group and am also a devout Rex Stout fan.
                   
                  I also have been wanting to start the Jeeves series since seeing it on PBS.
                   
                  What is the best one to start with ?



                  captcaffeine2004 <captcaffeine2004@...> wrote:
                  --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, Joe Suggs <jdsuggs@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > About the same time I started on Rex Stout, I started on P.G.
                  Wodehouse, and I've read about thirty or so of his hilarious books. 
                  I get a kick out of knowing that he and Stout were such mutual
                  admirers.  Wodehouse refers to detective fiction pretty frequently,
                  and on a few occasions I think he's taking a friendly shot at his
                  esteemed colleague- I think one of his characters had it "easier than
                  a New York detective writer", etc.
                  >
                  > Right now I'm finishing Very Good, Jeeves- a great collection of
                  early short stories with Jeeves and Wooster.  After that I'll
                  probably tackle another Wodehouse or Love and Hate In Jamestown by
                  David A. Price, which has been loaned and recommended to me.   Joe
                  > ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
                                                                                       
                    Hello Joe:  I've been wanting to start reading Wodehouse's Jeeves
                  series for a long time but I have been wondering where to start.  Is
                  the first book "My Man Jeeves" (1919)?  Is that a collection? (Asking
                  since a B & N store nearby always has a bunch of Jeeves books, but
                  never seems to have that one.) Should they be read in order?  Is
                  there anything on the net as public domain?  Input appreciated.  Take
                  care.
                        Vinny in Texas  
                  >
                  >            
                  >
                  >        
                  >                                                     > > 
                  >    
                  >      
                  >
                  >            
                  > ---------------------------------
                  > Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls. 
                  Great rates starting at 1&cent;/min.
                  >






                  Yahoo! Mail goes everywhere you do. Get it on your phone.


                  Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. PC-to-Phone calls for ridiculously low rates.

                • E.J. Ford
                  Joe, I start chuckling just reading your passage there. And any Wodehouse is worth reading - I started with a volume of his golf stories and I can tell you
                  Message 8 of 26 , May 10, 2006
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                    Joe, I start chuckling just reading your passage there.  And any Wodehouse is worth reading – I started with a volume of his golf stories and I can tell you that golf has never been funnier (or, for that matter, as interesting) than the way he described it. 

                     

                    Just pick one and take a stab!

                     

                    EJ

                     


                    From: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com [mailto: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Joe Suggs
                    Sent: Wednesday, May 10, 2006 5:33 PM
                    To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [NeroWolfe] Re: Jeeves and Wooster

                     

                    Alix, if you'll scroll back to May 2, I replied to this same question by Vinny from Texas , but the substance of it was this: jump in anywhere.  Reading Jeeves and Wooster in order is even less essential than reading Wolfe in order (his Blandings novels are another matter, though).  I started with Code Of the Woosters (1938), the funniest book ever written.  On page 106, Bertie neatly summarizes the most deranged plot I've ever read in a position paper dictated to Jeeves:

                    'Take pencil and paper, Jeeves, and we will assemble the facts.  Entitle the thing " Wooster , B.- position of." Ready?'

                    'Yes, sir.'

                    'Right.  Now then.  Item One- Aunt Dahlia says that if I don't pinch that cow-creamer and hand it over to her, she will bar me from her table, and no more of Anatole's cooking.'

                    'Yes, sir.'

                    'We now come to Item Two-viz., if I do pinch the cow-creamer and hand it over to her, Spode will beat me to a jelly.'

                    'Yes, sir.'

                    'Furthermore- Item Three- if I pinch it and hand it over to her and don't pinch it and hand it over to Harold Pinker, not only shall I undergo the jellying process alluded to above, but Stiffy will take that notebook of Gussie's and hand it over to Sir Watkyn Bassett.  And you and I know what the result of that would be.  Well, there you are.  That's the set-up.  You've got it?'

                    'Yes, sir.  It is certainly a somewhat unfortunate state of affairs.'

                    I gave him one of my looks.

                    'Jeeves', I said, "don't try me too high.  Not at a moment like this.'

                    The Spode alluded to is Roderick Spode, oversized aspiring dictator, founder of the London fascist group the Black Shorts (they had run out of shirts) and described by Bertie this way: "It was as if Nature had intended to make a gorilla and had changed its mind at the last moment."

                    What are you waiting for?

                    Joe




                    Alix Feldman <alixforwheels@...> wrote:

                    HI there to all, Im new to the group and am also a devout Rex Stout fan.

                     

                    I also have been wanting to start the Jeeves series since seeing it on PBS.

                     

                    What is the best one to start with ?

                     



                    captcaffeine2004 <captcaffeine2004@...> wrote:

                    --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com , Joe Suggs <jdsuggs@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > About the same time I started on Rex Stout, I started on P.G.
                    Wodehouse, and I've read about thirty or so of his hilarious books. 
                    I get a kick out of knowing that he and Stout were such mutual
                    admirers.  Wodehouse refers to detective fiction pretty frequently,
                    and on a few occasions I think he's taking a friendly shot at his
                    esteemed colleague- I think one of his characters had it "easier than
                    a New York detective writer", etc.
                    >
                    > Right now I'm finishing Very Good, Jeeves- a great collection of
                    early short stories with Jeeves and Wooster .  After that I'll
                    probably tackle another Wodehouse or Love and Hate In Jamestown by
                    David A. Price, which has been loaned and recommended to me.   Joe
                    > ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
                                                                                         
                      Hello Joe:  I've been wanting to start reading Wodehouse's Jeeves
                    series for a long time but I have been wondering where to start.  Is
                    the first book "My Man Jeeves" (1919)?  Is that a collection? (Asking
                    since a B & N store nearby always has a bunch of Jeeves books, but
                    never seems to have that one.) Should they be read in order?  Is
                    there anything on the net as public domain?  Input appreciated.  Take
                    care.
                          Vinny in Texas   
                    >
                    >            
                    >
                    >        
                    >                                                     > > 
                    >    
                    >      
                    >
                    >            
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls. 
                    Great rates starting at 1&cent;/min.
                    >



                     


                    Yahoo! Mail goes everywhere you do. Get it on your phone.

                     


                    Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. PC-to-Phone calls for ridiculously low rates.

                  • k_e_moeller
                    ... questions. There s another, farther-ranging POB forum at www.wwnorton.com/pob/pobhome.htm - choose the Forum. Karl
                    Message 9 of 26 , May 15, 2006
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                      --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, Jessie <entwold@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Lady Shelley wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Oh and the best reference of all: The Gunroom listserv
                      > > http://www.hmssurprise.org/Access/index.php?chg_node=1
                      > > chock full of knowledgable, nice people who will always answer
                      questions.

                      There's another, farther-ranging POB forum at

                      www.wwnorton.com/pob/pobhome.htm - choose the Forum.

                      Karl
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