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The late Irene Adler

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  • paige_everhart
    That citation is pretty brief and I am not such a Holmes fan as to keep details of the stories fresh in my mind... but might the late Irene Adler refer to
    Message 1 of 9 , May 5, 2003
      That citation is pretty brief and I am not such a Holmes fan as to
      keep details of the stories fresh in my mind... but might "the late"
      Irene Adler refer to the fact that at the end of the story she
      married and was thenceforth Mrs. John Doe or whoever (until recently
      or "lately" Miss Irene Adler)?

      --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, "Andy O'Brien" <deep13@b...> wrote:
      > Baring-Gould's assertion about Holmes, Adler and little baby Nero.
      It just
      > struck me that Irene Adler was mentioned as "the late Irene Adler"
      in 'A
      > Scandal in Bohemia', so how did B-G square that with Wolfe's mother
      being
      > alive in Budapest in Fer-De-Lance?
    • monsieur_paladin
      Hello Paige, You are correct, it was a brief citation, and while it could be inferred that Watson used late in the sense of formerly, Watson s usual
      Message 2 of 9 , May 6, 2003
        Hello Paige,

        You are correct, it was a brief citation, and while it could be
        inferred that Watson used 'late' in the sense of 'formerly,' Watson's
        usual reticence about publishing cases only after the principals
        cannot be injured by divulgence indicates to me that the connotation
        was 'deceased.' Oh, it was Godfrey Norton whom she wed.

        Vous souhaitant bon,
        Mr.Paladin

        --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, paige_everhart <no_reply@y...>
        wrote:
        > That citation is pretty brief and I am not such a Holmes fan as to
        > keep details of the stories fresh in my mind... but might "the
        late"
        > Irene Adler refer to the fact that at the end of the story she
        > married and was thenceforth Mrs. John Doe or whoever (until
        recently
        > or "lately" Miss Irene Adler)?
        >
        > --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, "Andy O'Brien" <deep13@b...>
        wrote:
        > > Baring-Gould's assertion about Holmes, Adler and little baby
        Nero.
        > It just
        > > struck me that Irene Adler was mentioned as "the late Irene
        Adler"
        > in 'A
        > > Scandal in Bohemia', so how did B-G square that with Wolfe's
        mother
        > being
        > > alive in Budapest in Fer-De-Lance?
      • Andy O'Brien
        From: paige_everhart ... It would be highly unusual to use a form of reference used for the dead ( the late ) rather than the usual way of refering to a
        Message 3 of 9 , May 8, 2003
          From: paige_everhart

          > might "the late" Irene Adler refer to the fact that at the end of the
          > story she married and was thenceforth Mrs. John Doe or whoever (until
          > recently or "lately" Miss Irene Adler)?

          It would be highly unusual to use a form of reference used for the dead
          ("the late") rather than the usual way of refering to a married woman (which
          she uses herself): Mrs Irene Norton née Adler.

          I really can't think of one instance where someone has said 'the late' and
          sincerely meant nothing more than a change of title.

          Anyway, I've seen enough of the TV series to know that Wolfe's parents
          probably looked like Kari Matchett and James Tolkan, practiacally everybody
          else in his world does.

          Andy O'Brien - Captain Marvel Jr.
        • paige_everhart
          Unusual but not impossible. Bearing in mind that we re talking about England 100 years ago and language usage is a little different from today ... the Oxford
          Message 4 of 9 , May 9, 2003
            Unusual but not impossible. Bearing in mind that we're talking about
            England 100 years ago and language usage is a little different from
            today ... the Oxford Encyclopedic English Dictionary gives as def. 4
            of "late":
            (prec. by *the* or *my, his,* etc.) no longer alive or having the
            specified status
            Note that "status" bit. The examples given are "my late husband; the
            late president." So if "the late president" can mean "the former
            president" and not just "the dead president," then "the late Irene
            Adler" could be "the former Irene Adler." That's not to say Conan
            Doyle meant it that way, but it *is* a legitimate use of the
            term "late."

            --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, "Andy O'Brien" <deep13@b...> wrote:

            > It would be highly unusual to use a form of reference used for the
            dead
            > ("the late") rather than the usual way of refering to a married
            woman (which
            > she uses herself): Mrs Irene Norton née Adler.
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