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Re: Alan Vanneman's Wolfe Threesome

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  • faterson2001
    Yeah, I heard that the final Dixon story was something wild, and the erratic chapter numbering seems to attest to the fact. ;-) This, I believe, is generally
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 18, 2012
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      Yeah, I heard that the final Dixon story was something wild, and the erratic chapter numbering seems to attest to the fact. ;-)

      This, I believe, is generally a danger for pastiche writers: they may get the first story -- or the first few stories -- right, but then they get bolder (too bold), and start overshooting the mark. Not just apparently true of Dixon but I heard many readers comment similarly on Goldsborough's sequels.

      I can see some indications of that occurring in Vanneman's threesome, too. While his transition of Wolfe & Archie to the 21st Century, post-9/11 New York has, overall, been successful (judging by the second story I'm currently reading), the quality of writing seems to have dipped a bit compared to the first story, set in the "classic" Wolfe period of 1935 (and that story even features a nice "Argentine connection" to _Fer-de-Lance_).

      Now, in the second story, with Archie constantly checking his sp*m email, and Wolfe calling the PC "the infernal machine"... it's not bad, but the two characters seem quaintly out-of-place in such an environment, particularly Archie, which caught me by surprise. I suppose Wolfe would, in a sense, be "out of place" in *any* era into which he might be born, so whether it happens to be 1935 or 2012 outside the brownstone, doesn't really make a difference. But to see Archie fiddling around with cell-phones... I don't know. Perhaps I'll get used to it more as I continue reading the stories. ;-)

      --
      Alex.
      www.stout.aboq.org



      --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" wrote:

      I enjoyed the first two pastiches by Glenn Dixon quite a bit. But I found the third to be completely unbelievable and, quite simply, terrible. Without giving anything away, the basic premise at the beginning was beyond fantastic. I've re-read his first two a couple of times but will never revisit the last one.
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