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Inertia

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  • k_e_moeller
    Bear with me here. I work for Apple, in one of their retail stores, as a Creative Specialist. That is, a full time trainer for people new to or using Apple
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 6, 2012
      Bear with me here. I work for Apple, in one of their retail stores, as a Creative Specialist. That is, a full time trainer for people new to or using Apple products. One of the main issues I deal with for my students at Apple is email. Many of their problems stem from using a less than competent email service provider, chief among them being A*L. When I encounter someone struggling with trying to get A*L mail working properly, I naturally ask, why don't you switch to a more effective provider of free accounts, such as GM*IL?

      They reply, "Well, I've had A*L for years, and everyone knows my A*L email address, and changing would be difficult, so I think I better STAY with A*L (no matter how lame it is)."

      My response for some years has been, "That shows that inertia is the greatest force in the world." Or, ".. the strongest force in nature." I've been saying this so long that I believed I originated the thought.

      However.

      I'm rereading Stout's Fer-de-Lance (and you thought this was off topic!) and guess what I see on top of page 122 in the Bantam paperback.. (Wolfe):

      "No, Archie. It is always wiser, when there is a choice, to trust to inertia. It is the greatest force in the world."

      I've been rereading Stout for years, though I tend to skip Fer-de-Lance and League of Frightened Men, as early, unpolished examples of the series, but this phrase had lodged itself so completely in my forebrain that, as I said, I actually believed it was an original thought.

      Apparently not! Huzzah for Rex Stout!!!

      best

      Karl
      Arizona
    • tree's books
      this is interesting in research on young children there was an experiment where they would have cards with colors and shapes. they d have the children play
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 6, 2012
        this is interesting
        in research on young children there was an experiment where they would have cards with
        colors and shapes.  they'd have the children play the cards by color.
        in the next game they have them play the cards by shape
        even though they fully understood the second game rules
        they still would play the cards by the first game rules.
        (this is a nutshell explanation of the research - it was much more detailed)
         
         the point was, the "first rule" effect
        even when we learn new ways we want to do things the first way.
         
        inertia
         
        tree
         
        ----- Original Message -----

         

        Bear with me here. I work for Apple, in one of their retail stores, as a Creative Specialist. That is, a full time trainer for people new to or using Apple products. One of the main issues I deal with for my students at Apple is email. Many of their problems stem from using a less than competent email service provider, chief among them being A*L. When I encounter someone struggling with trying to get A*L mail working properly, I naturally ask, why don't you switch to a more effective provider of free accounts, such as GM*IL?

        They reply, "Well, I've had A*L for years, and everyone knows my A*L email address, and changing would be difficult, so I think I better STAY with A*L (no matter how lame it is)."

        My response for some years has been, "That shows that inertia is the greatest force in the world." Or, ".. the strongest force in nature." I've been saying this so long that I believed I originated the thought.

        However.

        I'm rereading Stout's Fer-de-Lance (and you thought this was off topic!) and guess what I see on top of page 122 in the Bantam paperback.. (Wolfe):

        "No, Archie. It is always wiser, when there is a choice, to trust to inertia. It is the greatest force in the world."

        I've been rereading Stout for years, though I tend to skip Fer-de-Lance and League of Frightened Men, as early, unpolished examples of the series, but this phrase had lodged itself so completely in my forebrain that, as I said, I actually believed it was an original thought.

        Apparently not! Huzzah for Rex Stout!!!

        best

        Karl
        Arizona

      • briarpatch_39272
        Very interesting. The thing this brought to my mind was the old line about do something, even if it s wrong. Sometimes it is best to just do nothing.
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 6, 2012
          Very interesting. The thing this brought to my mind was the old line about "do something, even if it's wrong." Sometimes it is best to just do nothing. Certainly a lot of times, it is best to just say nothing. I wish I could teach this to my mouth.

          I know what you mean about trying to wean people off of AOL because it drives me nuts. AOL is about as useless as they come. I have had the same Yahoo email account for 12 years though, so I also understand the value of keeping the same email address. However, today, with Facebook, you can tell all the important people in your life your new email address in seconds. Now we come to the people who are still not on board with Facebook. lolol

          I am currently reading The Golden Spiders (again of course) and came across the word Replevin (a lawyer threatened to do this to Wolfe). I was so pleased to be reading on my new Kindle Fire, and could therefore just put my finger on the word and have the dictionary definition pop up on the screen. What a pleasure this new world is! But then again, I am easily entertained.

          Charlene


          --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, "tree's books" <treebook@...> wrote:
          >
          > this is interesting
          > in research on young children there was an experiment where they would have cards with
          > colors and shapes. they'd have the children play the cards by color.
          > in the next game they have them play the cards by shape
          > even though they fully understood the second game rules
          > they still would play the cards by the first game rules.
          > (this is a nutshell explanation of the research - it was much more detailed)
          >
          > the point was, the "first rule" effect
          > even when we learn new ways we want to do things the first way.
          >
          > inertia
          >
          > tree
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          >
          >
          >
          > Bear with me here. I work for Apple, in one of their retail stores, as a Creative Specialist. That is, a full time trainer for people new to or using Apple products. One of the main issues I deal with for my students at Apple is email. Many of their problems stem from using a less than competent email service provider, chief among them being A*L. When I encounter someone struggling with trying to get A*L mail working properly, I naturally ask, why don't you switch to a more effective provider of free accounts, such as GM*IL?
          >
          > They reply, "Well, I've had A*L for years, and everyone knows my A*L email address, and changing would be difficult, so I think I better STAY with A*L (no matter how lame it is)."
          >
          > My response for some years has been, "That shows that inertia is the greatest force in the world." Or, ".. the strongest force in nature." I've been saying this so long that I believed I originated the thought.
          >
          > However.
          >
          > I'm rereading Stout's Fer-de-Lance (and you thought this was off topic!) and guess what I see on top of page 122 in the Bantam paperback.. (Wolfe):
          >
          > "No, Archie. It is always wiser, when there is a choice, to trust to inertia. It is the greatest force in the world."
          >
          > I've been rereading Stout for years, though I tend to skip Fer-de-Lance and League of Frightened Men, as early, unpolished examples of the series, but this phrase had lodged itself so completely in my forebrain that, as I said, I actually believed it was an original thought.
          >
          > Apparently not! Huzzah for Rex Stout!!!
          >
          > best
          >
          > Karl
          > Arizona
          >
        • Bob Byrd
          this thread reminds me of two things:1.  Stout often sends me to the dictionary.  I forget which book had Wolfe using the word subdolous but it took me
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 6, 2012
            this thread reminds me of two things:
            1.  Stout often sends me to the dictionary.  I forget which book had Wolfe using the word "subdolous" but it took me forever before I finally found a dictionary that included that word.  I remember that after Wolfe used it Archie said something along the lines of "His trick of using a word he knew I didn't know the meaning of was probably subdolous."  (For the record, the word means "sly and crafty".)
            2.  I don't think I have used a Wolfe-ism thinking it originated with me but I do have favorite phrases from the corpus that I sometimes pepper my speech with.  Admittedly the occasions to use some of them are rare but when they occur it is a joy to pull them out of my hat and appear much wittier than I actually am.  I remember ending one conversation by saying, "My eyes are inured to ugliness but you offend them."    Another favorite:  "Being broke is not a disgrace it is only a catastrophe."

            Finally, Fer de Lance isn't one of my favorites, but I do enjoy The League of Frightened Men.

            Bob

            --- On Fri, 1/6/12, briarpatch_39272 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

            From: briarpatch_39272 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
            Subject: [NeroWolfe] Re: Inertia
            To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Friday, January 6, 2012, 12:36 PM

             

            Very interesting. The thing this brought to my mind was the old line about "do something, even if it's wrong." Sometimes it is best to just do nothing. Certainly a lot of times, it is best to just say nothing. I wish I could teach this to my mouth.

            I know what you mean about trying to wean people off of AOL because it drives me nuts. AOL is about as useless as they come. I have had the same Yahoo email account for 12 years though, so I also understand the value of keeping the same email address. However, today, with Facebook, you can tell all the important people in your life your new email address in seconds. Now we come to the people who are still not on board with Facebook. lolol

            I am currently reading The Golden Spiders (again of course) and came across the word Replevin (a lawyer threatened to do this to Wolfe). I was so pleased to be reading on my new Kindle Fire, and could therefore just put my finger on the word and have the dictionary definition pop up on the screen. What a pleasure this new world is! But then again, I am easily entertained.

            Charlene

            --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, "tree's books" <treebook@...> wrote:
            >
            > this is interesting
            > in research on young children there was an experiment where they would have cards with
            > colors and shapes. they'd have the children play the cards by color.
            > in the next game they have them play the cards by shape
            > even though they fully understood the second game rules
            > they still would play the cards by the first game rules.
            > (this is a nutshell explanation of the research - it was much more detailed)
            >
            > the point was, the "first rule" effect
            > even when we learn new ways we want to do things the first way.
            >
            > inertia
            >
            > tree
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            >
            >
            >
            > Bear with me here. I work for Apple, in one of their retail stores, as a Creative Specialist. That is, a full time trainer for people new to or using Apple products. One of the main issues I deal with for my students at Apple is email. Many of their problems stem from using a less than competent email service provider, chief among them being A*L. When I encounter someone struggling with trying to get A*L mail working properly, I naturally ask, why don't you switch to a more effective provider of free accounts, such as GM*IL?
            >
            > They reply, "Well, I've had A*L for years, and everyone knows my A*L email address, and changing would be difficult, so I think I better STAY with A*L (no matter how lame it is)."
            >
            > My response for some years has been, "That shows that inertia is the greatest force in the world." Or, ".. the strongest force in nature." I've been saying this so long that I believed I originated the thought.
            >
            > However.
            >
            > I'm rereading Stout's Fer-de-Lance (and you thought this was off topic!) and guess what I see on top of page 122 in the Bantam paperback.. (Wolfe):
            >
            > "No, Archie. It is always wiser, when there is a choice, to trust to inertia. It is the greatest force in the world."
            >
            > I've been rereading Stout for years, though I tend to skip Fer-de-Lance and League of Frightened Men, as early, unpolished examples of the series, but this phrase had lodged itself so completely in my forebrain that, as I said, I actually believed it was an original thought.
            >
            > Apparently not! Huzzah for Rex Stout!!!
            >
            > best
            >
            > Karl
            > Arizona
            >

          • a@aboq.org
            ... It s the reverse for me. Although _Fer-de-Lance_ isn t fully typical of the Corpus, it s possibly the best Nero Wolfe book in terms of literary quality.
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 6, 2012
              On Friday, January 2012 at 10:57:21 (GMT -0800 PST), Bob Byrd wrote:

              > Finally, Fer de Lance isn't one of my favorites, but I do enjoy The League of Frightened Men.

              It's the reverse for me. Although _Fer-de-Lance_ isn't fully typical of the Corpus,
              it's possibly the best Nero Wolfe book in terms of literary quality. (Weak from the
              whodunnit point of view.) I was disappointed by _The League of Frightened Men_
              when I re-read it last; wordy and overlong -- unpolished indeed.

              As to random Wolfean phrases popping into one's mind when one least
              expects it, it *really* happens to me often that, when I look into the mirror,
              I suddenly think of Wolfe's sentence (from _Over My Dead Body_),
              "I carry this fat around to insulate my feelings." :-D Also -- and this
              practically turned into a bedtime prayer for me -- before going to bed
              every night, I can't help thinking of Archie's "I absolutely refuse to
              permit any wear and tear on my brain after my head hits the pillow."
              That's because I've been struggling with sleep irregularity for many
              years; I can only envy Archie his carefree regular sleep of 8 hours a day. :-|

              --
              Yours,
              Alex.
              http://stout.aboq.org

              [processed by "The Bat!", Version 4.2.44.2]
            • tree's books
              just finished reading this, what a rollercoaster ride! also I was surprised at Cramer s cigar smoking, because of Archie never have seen him smoking one
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 26, 2012
                just finished reading this, what a rollercoaster ride!
                 
                also I was surprised at Cramer's cigar smoking,
                because of Archie "never have seen him smoking one"
                hmm...did Rex Stout forget?
                 
                tree
              • Terry Powell
                I think he did forget that time.  Of course this could fall under first time for everything. ... I think he did forget that time. Of course this could fall
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 26, 2012
                  I think he did forget that time.  Of course this could fall under first time for everything.

                  From: tree's books <treebook@...>
                  To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2012 3:33 PM
                  Subject: [NeroWolfe] the final deduction

                   
                  just finished reading this, what a rollercoaster ride!
                   
                  also I was surprised at Cramer's cigar smoking,
                  because of Archie "never have seen him smoking one"
                  hmm...did Rex Stout forget?
                   
                  tree


                • ALAIN ALTOUNIAN
                  This was one of the few NW s where i correctly guessed whodunnit...possibly the only one where my guess was also relatively early and spot-on. ... From:
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 27, 2012
                    This was one of the few NW's where i correctly guessed whodunnit...possibly the only one where my guess was also relatively early and spot-on.

                    --- On Fri, 1/27/12, Terry Powell <kb9ree@...> wrote:

                    From: Terry Powell <kb9ree@...>
                    Subject: Re: [NeroWolfe] the final deduction
                    To: "nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com" <nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com>
                    Date: Friday, January 27, 2012, 2:27 AM

                     
                    I think he did forget that time.  Of course this could fall under first time for everything.

                    From: tree's books <treebook@...>
                    To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2012 3:33 PM
                    Subject: [NeroWolfe] the final deduction

                     
                    just finished reading this, what a rollercoaster ride!
                     
                    also I was surprised at Cramer's cigar smoking,
                    because of Archie "never have seen him smoking one"
                    hmm...did Rex Stout forget?
                     
                    tree


                  • David E. Piccus
                    In his second Nero Wolfe book: The Frightened Men: Cramer was in his office when I got there, and didn t keep me waiting. He was smoking a big cigar and
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jan 29, 2012
                      In his second Nero Wolfe book:
                       "The Frightened Men:

                      Cramer was in his office when I got there, and didn't keep me
                      waiting. He was smoking a big cigar and looked contented.

                      Archie smoked cigarettes in that book, as well.

                      In "The Rubber Band:

                      WOLFE and the inspector exchanged greetings. Cramer sat down
                      and got out a cigar and bit off the end, and held a match to it.
                      Wolfe got a hand up and pinched his nostrils between a thumb
                      and a forefinger to warn the membranes of the assault that was
                      coming. 

                      In "The Red Box":

                      I returned to the wire and had more talk. Cramer was as amiable
                      as a guy stopping you on a lonely hill because he's out of gas. I
                      turned to Wolfe again:
                      "He'd like to stop in at six o'clock to smoke a cigar. He says, to
                      compare notes. He means S O S."

                      Cramer stared at his worn-out cigar for a minute, then reached
                      out and put it in the ashtray and felt in his pocket for a new one.
                      He bit off the end and got the shreds off his tongue, socked his
                      teeth into it again, and lit it. He puffed a thick cloud around him,
                      got a new grip with his teeth, and settled back.

                      Cramer seems to have chewed them from "Over My Dead Body" through most of the corpus.
                      Archie smoked cigarettes until Rex Stout stopped smoking himself, I believe. He smoked with Lily Rowen when she was introduced in:
                      "Some Buried Caesar" on the running board of Wolfe's crashed car.

                      Such trivial information from a true fan. I am re-reading the corpus in order and am currently reading "The Black Mountain", one of my many favorites.

                      Best regards,


                      David Piccus


                      depiccus@...

                      195 West State Street

                      Lehi, UT 84043

                      801-768-9194

                      801-319-5716

                      www.piccus4color.com


                      On Jan 27, 2012, at 3:53 PM, ALAIN ALTOUNIAN wrote:

                       

                      This was one of the few NW's where i correctly guessed whodunnit...possibly the only one where my guess was also relatively early and spot-on.

                      --- On Fri, 1/27/12, Terry Powell <kb9ree@...> wrote:

                      From: Terry Powell <kb9ree@...>
                      Subject: Re: [NeroWolfe] the final deduction
                      To: "nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com" <nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com>
                      Date: Friday, January 27, 2012, 2:27 AM

                       
                      I think he did forget that time.  Of course this could fall under first time for everything.

                      From: tree's books <treebook@...>
                      To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2012 3:33 PM
                      Subject: [NeroWolfe] the final deduction

                       
                      just finished reading this, what a rollercoaster ride!
                       
                      also I was surprised at Cramer's cigar smoking,
                      because of Archie "never have seen him smoking one"
                      hmm...did Rex Stout forget?
                       
                      tree



                    • Bob Byrd
                      in my case, the only one I solved correctly (before Wolfe) was Gambit. ... From: ALAIN ALTOUNIAN Subject: Re: [NeroWolfe] the final
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jan 29, 2012
                        in my case, the only one I solved correctly (before Wolfe) was Gambit.

                        --- On Fri, 1/27/12, ALAIN ALTOUNIAN <alainalt@...> wrote:

                        From: ALAIN ALTOUNIAN <alainalt@...>
                        Subject: Re: [NeroWolfe] the final deduction
                        To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Friday, January 27, 2012, 4:53 PM

                         

                        This was one of the few NW's where i correctly guessed whodunnit...possibly the only one where my guess was also relatively early and spot-on.

                        --- On Fri, 1/27/12, Terry Powell <kb9ree@...> wrote:

                        From: Terry Powell <kb9ree@...>
                        Subject: Re: [NeroWolfe] the final deduction
                        To: "nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com" <nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com>
                        Date: Friday, January 27, 2012, 2:27 AM

                         
                        I think he did forget that time.  Of course this could fall under first time for everything.

                        From: tree's books <treebook@...>
                        To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2012 3:33 PM
                        Subject: [NeroWolfe] the final deduction

                         
                        just finished reading this, what a rollercoaster ride!
                         
                        also I was surprised at Cramer's cigar smoking,
                        because of Archie "never have seen him smoking one"
                        hmm...did Rex Stout forget?
                         
                        tree


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