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Fwd: [GAdetection] Rex Stout &Jane Austen

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  • Jim
    In a message dated 12/24/2010 7:55:05 AM Eastern Standard Time, GAdetection@yahoogroups.com writes: The following is from the introduction of Death Times
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 24, 2010
      In a message dated 12/24/2010 7:55:05 AM Eastern Standard Time, GAdetection@yahoogroups.com writes:
      The following is from the introduction of "Death Times Three," written
      by John McAleer, Stout's biographer:

      'During the last years of Rex Stout's life, as his authorized
      biographer, I received numerous letters from well-wishers and, on
      occasion, not-such-well-wishers, offering me advice. "Is it true," one
      of the letters asked, "that Stout has a secretary who writes all his
      stuff for him?" I showed the letter to Rex, then in his eighty-ninth
      year. He scanned it and said, "Tell him the name is Jane Austen, but I
      haven't the address." The joke was on the letter writer. Rex was
      classing himself with the best. Not long before that he had told me, "I
      used to think that men did everything better than women, but that was
      before I read Jane Austen. I don't think any man ever wrote better than
      Jane Austen."

      In 1941, Stout wrote an article for Vogue in which he said, "a law
      should be passed at once prohibiting females from writing detective
      stories." But then he had a dream that disturbed him. Quoting McAleer:
      "Hence it was a shock to him when he began to dream that Jane [Austen]
      'had come back to life and started writing detective stories.'"

      In my opinion, Stout's subconscious was trying to tell him something,
      because subconsciously he realized what he could not quite bring to
      explicit awareness, which is that Emma has a full fledged shadow story
      (i.e., parallel fictional universe).

      Here is the Stout quote you were thinking of, but not about Pride and
      Prejudice--Stout speaking directly to McAleer:"[Austen] chose and
      handled words without the slightest attempt to assert their importance
      as 'literature.' She made no pretensions of any kind. She sustained
      suspense without strain better than any other writer of fiction."

      And more from McAleer: "It was no coincidence that, when I asked after
      Wolfe a few days before Rex died, Rex confided, "he's rereading Emma."
      Rex ranked Emma as Jane Austen"s masterpiece. In the last weeks of his
      life he also reread it. That a book could be reread was to him solid
      proof of its worth. Thus it pleased him when P.G. Wodehouse, whom Rex
      admired, declared, at ninety-four, in a letter that he wrote to me, " he
      [Stout] passes the supreme test of being rereadable. I don't know how
      many times I have reread the Wolfe stories, but plenty. I know exactly
      what is coming and how it is all going to end, but it doesn't matter.
      That's writing."

      Stout's Nero Wolfe's views were more ambivalent--in /The Mother Hunt/,
      in chapter 12, Archie says, "Dol and Sally had been responsible, six
      years back, for my revision of my basic attitude toward female ops, and
      I held it against them, just as Wolfe held it against Jane Austen for
      forcing him to concede that a woman could write a good novel."
    • Terry Powell
      Seems to me that most of the detective type stories now-a-days are written indeed by women.  Some with a definite anti-Christian agenda, even.  As a reader
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 24, 2010
        Seems to me that most of the detective type stories now-a-days are written indeed by women.  Some with a definite anti-Christian agenda, even.  As a reader of detective fiction and even the type which tout ordinary people as amateur detectives, I have to admit that none of them can hold a candle to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe novels and short stories.  Too bad there is no one I can see in these days, man or woman who is of Rex Stout's detective writing caliber.
        Rex is like a Canon and today's writers mostly seem like BB guns.
        Terry Powell

        --- On Fri, 12/24/10, Jim <Taylor401306@...> wrote:

        From: Jim <Taylor401306@...>
        Subject: [NeroWolfe] Fwd: [GAdetection] Rex Stout &Jane Austen
        To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, December 24, 2010, 9:11 AM

         

        In a message dated 12/24/2010 7:55:05 AM Eastern Standard Time, GAdetection@yahoogroups.com writes:
        The following is from the introduction of "Death Times Three," written
        by John McAleer, Stout's biographer:

        'During the last years of Rex Stout's life, as his authorized
        biographer, I received numerous letters from well-wishers and, on
        occasion, not-such-well-wishers, offering me advice. "Is it true," one
        of the letters asked, "that Stout has a secretary who writes all his
        stuff for him?" I showed the letter to Rex, then in his eighty-ninth
        year. He scanned it and said, "Tell him the name is Jane Austen, but I
        haven't the address." The joke was on the letter writer. Rex was
        classing himself with the best. Not long before that he had told me, "I
        used to think that men did everything better than women, but that was
        before I read Jane Austen. I don't think any man ever wrote better than
        Jane Austen."

        In 1941, Stout wrote an article for Vogue in which he said, "a law
        should be passed at once prohibiting females from writing detective
        stories." But then he had a dream that disturbed him. Quoting McAleer:
        "Hence it was a shock to him when he began to dream that Jane [Austen]
        'had come back to life and started writing detective stories.'"

        In my opinion, Stout's subconscious was trying to tell him something,
        because subconsciously he realized what he could not quite bring to
        explicit awareness, which is that Emma has a full fledged shadow story
        (i.e., parallel fictional universe).

        Here is the Stout quote you were thinking of, but not about Pride and
        Prejudice--Stout speaking directly to McAleer:"[Austen] chose and
        handled words without the slightest attempt to assert their importance
        as 'literature.' She made no pretensions of any kind. She sustained
        suspense without strain better than any other writer of fiction."

        And more from McAleer: "It was no coincidence that, when I asked after
        Wolfe a few days before Rex died, Rex confided, "he's rereading Emma."
        Rex ranked Emma as Jane Austen"s masterpiece. In the last weeks of his
        life he also reread it. That a book could be reread was to him solid
        proof of its worth. Thus it pleased him when P.G. Wodehouse, whom Rex
        admired, declared, at ninety-four, in a letter that he wrote to me, " he
        [Stout] passes the supreme test of being rereadable. I don't know how
        many times I have reread the Wolfe stories, but plenty. I know exactly
        what is coming and how it is all going to end, but it doesn't matter.
        That's writing."

        Stout's Nero Wolfe's views were more ambivalent--in /The Mother Hunt/,
        in chapter 12, Archie says, "Dol and Sally had been responsible, six
        years back, for my revision of my basic attitude toward female ops, and
        I held it against them, just as Wolfe held it against Jane Austen for
        forcing him to concede that a woman could write a good novel."


      • Terry Powell
        Don t forget folks that: this is  a great time to read the classic Wolfe short story called Christmas Party .  If you have not discovered this for yourself,
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 24, 2010
          Don't forget folks that: this is  a great time to read the classic Wolfe short story called "Christmas Party".  If you have not discovered this for yourself, Wolfe outdoes himself with the charade in this one.
          Enjoy.
          Merry Christmas and most of all God bless.
          Terry Powell

          --- On Fri, 12/24/10, Jim <Taylor401306@...> wrote:

          From: Jim <Taylor401306@...>
          Subject: [NeroWolfe] Fwd: [GAdetection] Rex Stout &Jane Austen
          To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Friday, December 24, 2010, 9:11 AM

           

          In a message dated 12/24/2010 7:55:05 AM Eastern Standard Time, GAdetection@yahoogroups.com writes:
          The following is from the introduction of "Death Times Three," written
          by John McAleer, Stout's biographer:

          'During the last years of Rex Stout's life, as his authorized
          biographer, I received numerous letters from well-wishers and, on
          occasion, not-such-well-wishers, offering me advice. "Is it true," one
          of the letters asked, "that Stout has a secretary who writes all his
          stuff for him?" I showed the letter to Rex, then in his eighty-ninth
          year. He scanned it and said, "Tell him the name is Jane Austen, but I
          haven't the address." The joke was on the letter writer. Rex was
          classing himself with the best. Not long before that he had told me, "I
          used to think that men did everything better than women, but that was
          before I read Jane Austen. I don't think any man ever wrote better than
          Jane Austen."

          In 1941, Stout wrote an article for Vogue in which he said, "a law
          should be passed at once prohibiting females from writing detective
          stories." But then he had a dream that disturbed him. Quoting McAleer:
          "Hence it was a shock to him when he began to dream that Jane [Austen]
          'had come back to life and started writing detective stories.'"

          In my opinion, Stout's subconscious was trying to tell him something,
          because subconsciously he realized what he could not quite bring to
          explicit awareness, which is that Emma has a full fledged shadow story
          (i.e., parallel fictional universe).

          Here is the Stout quote you were thinking of, but not about Pride and
          Prejudice--Stout speaking directly to McAleer:"[Austen] chose and
          handled words without the slightest attempt to assert their importance
          as 'literature.' She made no pretensions of any kind. She sustained
          suspense without strain better than any other writer of fiction."

          And more from McAleer: "It was no coincidence that, when I asked after
          Wolfe a few days before Rex died, Rex confided, "he's rereading Emma."
          Rex ranked Emma as Jane Austen"s masterpiece. In the last weeks of his
          life he also reread it. That a book could be reread was to him solid
          proof of its worth. Thus it pleased him when P.G. Wodehouse, whom Rex
          admired, declared, at ninety-four, in a letter that he wrote to me, " he
          [Stout] passes the supreme test of being rereadable. I don't know how
          many times I have reread the Wolfe stories, but plenty. I know exactly
          what is coming and how it is all going to end, but it doesn't matter.
          That's writing."

          Stout's Nero Wolfe's views were more ambivalent--in /The Mother Hunt/,
          in chapter 12, Archie says, "Dol and Sally had been responsible, six
          years back, for my revision of my basic attitude toward female ops, and
          I held it against them, just as Wolfe held it against Jane Austen for
          forcing him to concede that a woman could write a good novel."


        • Jenna Welch
          Jim, thank you for sharing that wonderful intro. Terry, could you recommend one of the stories you referenced written by a woman with a definite
          Message 4 of 9 , Dec 27, 2010
            Jim, thank you for sharing that wonderful intro.  Terry, could you recommend one of the stories you referenced written by a woman with a "definite anti-Christian agenda"?  I would be genuinely interested in reading one.
             
            Happy holidays, gang!

            On Fri, Dec 24, 2010 at 2:04 PM, Terry Powell <kb9ree@...> wrote:
             

            Seems to me that most of the detective type stories now-a-days are written indeed by women.  Some with a definite anti-Christian agenda, even.  As a reader of detective fiction and even the type which tout ordinary people as amateur detectives, I have to admit that none of them can hold a candle to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe novels and short stories.  Too bad there is no one I can see in these days, man or woman who is of Rex Stout's detective writing caliber.
            Rex is like a Canon and today's writers mostly seem like BB guns.
            Terry Powell

            --- On Fri, 12/24/10, Jim <Taylor401306@...> wrote:

            From: Jim <Taylor401306@...>
            Subject: [NeroWolfe] Fwd: [GAdetection] Rex Stout &Jane Austen
            To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Friday, December 24, 2010, 9:11 AM


             

            In a message dated 12/24/2010 7:55:05 AM Eastern Standard Time, GAdetection@yahoogroups.com writes:
            The following is from the introduction of "Death Times Three," written
            by John McAleer, Stout's biographer:

            'During the last years of Rex Stout's life, as his authorized
            biographer, I received numerous letters from well-wishers and, on
            occasion, not-such-well-wishers, offering me advice. "Is it true," one
            of the letters asked, "that Stout has a secretary who writes all his
            stuff for him?" I showed the letter to Rex, then in his eighty-ninth
            year. He scanned it and said, "Tell him the name is Jane Austen, but I
            haven't the address." The joke was on the letter writer. Rex was
            classing himself with the best. Not long before that he had told me, "I
            used to think that men did everything better than women, but that was
            before I read Jane Austen. I don't think any man ever wrote better than
            Jane Austen."

            In 1941, Stout wrote an article for Vogue in which he said, "a law
            should be passed at once prohibiting females from writing detective
            stories." But then he had a dream that disturbed him. Quoting McAleer:
            "Hence it was a shock to him when he began to dream that Jane [Austen]
            'had come back to life and started writing detective stories.'"

            In my opinion, Stout's subconscious was trying to tell him something,
            because subconsciously he realized what he could not quite bring to
            explicit awareness, which is that Emma has a full fledged shadow story
            (i.e., parallel fictional universe).

            Here is the Stout quote you were thinking of, but not about Pride and
            Prejudice--Stout speaking directly to McAleer:"[Austen] chose and
            handled words without the slightest attempt to assert their importance
            as 'literature.' She made no pretensions of any kind. She sustained
            suspense without strain better than any other writer of fiction."

            And more from McAleer: "It was no coincidence that, when I asked after
            Wolfe a few days before Rex died, Rex confided, "he's rereading Emma."
            Rex ranked Emma as Jane Austen"s masterpiece. In the last weeks of his
            life he also reread it. That a book could be reread was to him solid
            proof of its worth. Thus it pleased him when P.G. Wodehouse, whom Rex
            admired, declared, at ninety-four, in a letter that he wrote to me, " he
            [Stout] passes the supreme test of being rereadable. I don't know how
            many times I have reread the Wolfe stories, but plenty. I know exactly
            what is coming and how it is all going to end, but it doesn't matter.
            That's writing."

            Stout's Nero Wolfe's views were more ambivalent--in /The Mother Hunt/,
            in chapter 12, Archie says, "Dol and Sally had been responsible, six
            years back, for my revision of my basic attitude toward female ops, and
            I held it against them, just as Wolfe held it against Jane Austen for
            forcing him to concede that a woman could write a good novel."



          • Terry Powell
            I would not want to contribute to the poisoning of your mind by this.  I have myself slacked off on reading the modern authors of late.  Last time I tried to
            Message 5 of 9 , Dec 29, 2010
              I would not want to contribute to the poisoning of your mind by this.  I have myself slacked off on reading the modern authors of late.  Last time I tried to read one of these because I was enjoying the series otherwise, I just could not get into it. I got one of these paperbacks just sitting on shelf somewhere and can't bring myself to get into it. Maybe some day.
              Lately, been reading more of the old Sherlock Holmes stories, due to I needed some literary "comfort food".  Been doing a lot of reading while my wife was in hospital out of town.  Being there with her doing a lot of snoozing and of course during the surgery, I had a lot of time for reading.
              Terry

              --- On Mon, 12/27/10, Jenna Welch <jennalwelch@...> wrote:

              From: Jenna Welch <jennalwelch@...>
              Subject: Re: [NeroWolfe] Fwd: [GAdetection] Rex Stout &Jane Austen
              To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, December 27, 2010, 8:48 AM

               

              Jim, thank you for sharing that wonderful intro.  Terry, could you recommend one of the stories you referenced written by a woman with a "definite anti-Christian agenda"?  I would be genuinely interested in reading one.
               
              Happy holidays, gang!

              On Fri, Dec 24, 2010 at 2:04 PM, Terry Powell <kb9ree@...> wrote:
               

              Seems to me that most of the detective type stories now-a-days are written indeed by women.  Some with a definite anti-Christian agenda, even.  As a reader of detective fiction and even the type which tout ordinary people as amateur detectives, I have to admit that none of them can hold a candle to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe novels and short stories.  Too bad there is no one I can see in these days, man or woman who is of Rex Stout's detective writing caliber.
              Rex is like a Canon and today's writers mostly seem like BB guns.
              Terry Powell

              --- On Fri, 12/24/10, Jim <Taylor401306@...> wrote:

              From: Jim <Taylor401306@...>
              Subject: [NeroWolfe] Fwd: [GAdetection] Rex Stout &Jane Austen
              To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Friday, December 24, 2010, 9:11 AM


               

              In a message dated 12/24/2010 7:55:05 AM Eastern Standard Time, GAdetection@yahoogroups.com writes:
              The following is from the introduction of "Death Times Three," written
              by John McAleer, Stout's biographer:

              'During the last years of Rex Stout's life, as his authorized
              biographer, I received numerous letters from well-wishers and, on
              occasion, not-such-well-wishers, offering me advice. "Is it true," one
              of the letters asked, "that Stout has a secretary who writes all his
              stuff for him?" I showed the letter to Rex, then in his eighty-ninth
              year. He scanned it and said, "Tell him the name is Jane Austen, but I
              haven't the address." The joke was on the letter writer. Rex was
              classing himself with the best. Not long before that he had told me, "I
              used to think that men did everything better than women, but that was
              before I read Jane Austen. I don't think any man ever wrote better than
              Jane Austen."

              In 1941, Stout wrote an article for Vogue in which he said, "a law
              should be passed at once prohibiting females from writing detective
              stories." But then he had a dream that disturbed him. Quoting McAleer:
              "Hence it was a shock to him when he began to dream that Jane [Austen]
              'had come back to life and started writing detective stories.'"

              In my opinion, Stout's subconscious was trying to tell him something,
              because subconsciously he realized what he could not quite bring to
              explicit awareness, which is that Emma has a full fledged shadow story
              (i.e., parallel fictional universe).

              Here is the Stout quote you were thinking of, but not about Pride and
              Prejudice--Stout speaking directly to McAleer:"[Austen] chose and
              handled words without the slightest attempt to assert their importance
              as 'literature.' She made no pretensions of any kind. She sustained
              suspense without strain better than any other writer of fiction."

              And more from McAleer: "It was no coincidence that, when I asked after
              Wolfe a few days before Rex died, Rex confided, "he's rereading Emma."
              Rex ranked Emma as Jane Austen"s masterpiece. In the last weeks of his
              life he also reread it. That a book could be reread was to him solid
              proof of its worth. Thus it pleased him when P.G. Wodehouse, whom Rex
              admired, declared, at ninety-four, in a letter that he wrote to me, " he
              [Stout] passes the supreme test of being rereadable. I don't know how
              many times I have reread the Wolfe stories, but plenty. I know exactly
              what is coming and how it is all going to end, but it doesn't matter.
              That's writing."

              Stout's Nero Wolfe's views were more ambivalent--in /The Mother Hunt/,
              in chapter 12, Archie says, "Dol and Sally had been responsible, six
              years back, for my revision of my basic attitude toward female ops, and
              I held it against them, just as Wolfe held it against Jane Austen for
              forcing him to concede that a woman could write a good novel."




            • Ken Wildman
              I just changed my book reader on my Droid phone from Aldiko to Kindle and have downloaded two Jane Austen stories to read while in the hospital. Somehow I
              Message 6 of 9 , Dec 30, 2010
                I just changed my book reader on my Droid phone from Aldiko to Kindle and have downloaded two Jane Austen stories to read while in the hospital.
                 
                Somehow I missed reading any of her work in College, strange for an English Lit minor, but I intend to catch up -- finally.   :)
                 
                I'm also taking the firtst book in a Science Fiction series by an amazing young author.  Thje book is Old Man's War by John Scalzi.  He's a forty year old who has done a simply amazing job of capturing the feelings of an old man going through a rejuvenation to serve in a military "space war".   Not a genre for every one here, but absolutely first rate witing for someone with eclectic reading tastes like mine. 
                 
                Scalzi is one of a very few authors who motivate me to re-read his work.
                 
                Rusterman
                aka Ken Wildman

                On Thu, Dec 30, 2010 at 12:37 AM, Terry Powell <kb9ree@...> wrote:


                I would not want to contribute to the poisoning of your mind by this.  I have myself slacked off on reading the modern authors of late.  Last time I tried to read one of these because I was enjoying the series otherwise, I just could not get into it. I got one of these paperbacks just sitting on shelf somewhere and can't bring myself to get into it. Maybe some day.
                Lately, been reading more of the old Sherlock Holmes stories, due to I needed some literary "comfort food".  Been doing a lot of reading while my wife was in hospital out of town.  Being there with her doing a lot of snoozing and of course during the surgery, I had a lot of time for reading.
                Terry

                --- On Mon, 12/27/10, Jenna Welch <jennalwelch@...> wrote:

                From: Jenna Welch <jennalwelch@...>
                Subject: Re: [NeroWolfe] Fwd: [GAdetection] Rex Stout &Jane Austen
                To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, December 27, 2010, 8:48 AM

                 

                Jim, thank you for sharing that wonderful intro.  Terry, could you recommend one of the stories you referenced written by a woman with a "definite anti-Christian agenda"?  I would be genuinely interested in reading one.
                 
                Happy holidays, gang!

                On Fri, Dec 24, 2010 at 2:04 PM, Terry Powell <kb9ree@...> wrote:
                 

                Seems to me that most of the detective type stories now-a-days are written indeed by women.  Some with a definite anti-Christian agenda, even.  As a reader of detective fiction and even the type which tout ordinary people as amateur detectives, I have to admit that none of them can hold a candle to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe novels and short stories.  Too bad there is no one I can see in these days, man or woman who is of Rex Stout's detective writing caliber.
                Rex is like a Canon and today's writers mostly seem like BB guns.
                Terry Powell

                --- On Fri, 12/24/10, Jim <Taylor401306@...> wrote:

                From: Jim <Taylor401306@...>
                Subject: [NeroWolfe] Fwd: [GAdetection] Rex Stout &Jane Austen
                To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Friday, December 24, 2010, 9:11 AM


                 

                In a message dated 12/24/2010 7:55:05 AM Eastern Standard Time, GAdetection@yahoogroups.com writes:
                The following is from the introduction of "Death Times Three," written
                by John McAleer, Stout's biographer:

                'During the last years of Rex Stout's life, as his authorized
                biographer, I received numerous letters from well-wishers and, on
                occasion, not-such-well-wishers, offering me advice. "Is it true," one
                of the letters asked, "that Stout has a secretary who writes all his
                stuff for him?" I showed the letter to Rex, then in his eighty-ninth
                year. He scanned it and said, "Tell him the name is Jane Austen, but I
                haven't the address." The joke was on the letter writer. Rex was
                classing himself with the best. Not long before that he had told me, "I
                used to think that men did everything better than women, but that was
                before I read Jane Austen. I don't think any man ever wrote better than
                Jane Austen."

                In 1941, Stout wrote an article for Vogue in which he said, "a law
                should be passed at once prohibiting females from writing detective
                stories." But then he had a dream that disturbed him. Quoting McAleer:
                "Hence it was a shock to him when he began to dream that Jane [Austen]
                'had come back to life and started writing detective stories.'"

                In my opinion, Stout's subconscious was trying to tell him something,
                because subconsciously he realized what he could not quite bring to
                explicit awareness, which is that Emma has a full fledged shadow story
                (i.e., parallel fictional universe).

                Here is the Stout quote you were thinking of, but not about Pride and
                Prejudice--Stout speaking directly to McAleer:"[Austen] chose and
                handled words without the slightest attempt to assert their importance
                as 'literature.' She made no pretensions of any kind. She sustained
                suspense without strain better than any other writer of fiction."

                And more from McAleer: "It was no coincidence that, when I asked after
                Wolfe a few days before Rex died, Rex confided, "he's rereading Emma."
                Rex ranked Emma as Jane Austen"s masterpiece. In the last weeks of his
                life he also reread it. That a book could be reread was to him solid
                proof of its worth. Thus it pleased him when P.G. Wodehouse, whom Rex
                admired, declared, at ninety-four, in a letter that he wrote to me, " he
                [Stout] passes the supreme test of being rereadable. I don't know how
                many times I have reread the Wolfe stories, but plenty. I know exactly
                what is coming and how it is all going to end, but it doesn't matter.
                That's writing."

                Stout's Nero Wolfe's views were more ambivalent--in /The Mother Hunt/,
                in chapter 12, Archie says, "Dol and Sally had been responsible, six
                years back, for my revision of my basic attitude toward female ops, and
                I held it against them, just as Wolfe held it against Jane Austen for
                forcing him to concede that a woman could write a good novel."







              • ofwordsandbooks
                Could you please give an example of an author and book that would fit your description? I m would like to read one or more. Thanks!
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 5, 2011
                  Could you please give an example of an author and book that would fit your description?

                  I'm would like to read one or more.

                  Thanks!

                  --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, Terry Powell <kb9ree@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Seems to me that most of the detective type stories now-a-days are written indeed by women.  Some with a definite anti-Christian agenda, even.  As a reader of detective fiction and even the type which tout ordinary people as amateur detectives, I have to admit that none of them can hold a candle to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe novels and short stories.  Too bad there is no one I can see in these days, man or woman who is of Rex Stout's detective writing caliber.
                  > Rex is like a Canon and today's writers mostly seem like BB guns.
                  > Terry Powell
                  >
                  > --- On Fri, 12/24/10, Jim <Taylor401306@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > From: Jim <Taylor401306@...>
                  > Subject: [NeroWolfe] Fwd: [GAdetection] Rex Stout &Jane Austen
                  > To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
                  > Date: Friday, December 24, 2010, 9:11 AM
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > In a message dated 12/24/2010 7:55:05 AM Eastern Standard Time, GAdetection@yahoogroups.com writes:
                  >
                  > The following is from the introduction of "Death Times Three," written
                  >
                  > by John McAleer, Stout's biographer:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > 'During the last years of Rex Stout's life, as his authorized
                  >
                  > biographer, I received numerous letters from well-wishers and, on
                  >
                  > occasion, not-such-well-wishers, offering me advice. "Is it true," one
                  >
                  > of the letters asked, "that Stout has a secretary who writes all his
                  >
                  > stuff for him?" I showed the letter to Rex, then in his eighty-ninth
                  >
                  > year. He scanned it and said, "Tell him the name is Jane Austen, but I
                  >
                  > haven't the address." The joke was on the letter writer. Rex was
                  >
                  > classing himself with the best. Not long before that he had told me, "I
                  >
                  > used to think that men did everything better than women, but that was
                  >
                  > before I read Jane Austen. I don't think any man ever wrote better than
                  >
                  > Jane Austen."
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > In 1941, Stout wrote an article for Vogue in which he said, "a law
                  >
                  > should be passed at once prohibiting females from writing detective
                  >
                  > stories." But then he had a dream that disturbed him. Quoting McAleer:
                  >
                  > "Hence it was a shock to him when he began to dream that Jane [Austen]
                  >
                  > 'had come back to life and started writing detective stories.'"
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > In my opinion, Stout's subconscious was trying to tell him something,
                  >
                  > because subconsciously he realized what he could not quite bring to
                  >
                  > explicit awareness, which is that Emma has a full fledged shadow story
                  >
                  > (i.e., parallel fictional universe).
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Here is the Stout quote you were thinking of, but not about Pride and
                  >
                  > Prejudice--Stout speaking directly to McAleer:"[Austen] chose and
                  >
                  > handled words without the slightest attempt to assert their importance
                  >
                  > as 'literature.' She made no pretensions of any kind. She sustained
                  >
                  > suspense without strain better than any other writer of fiction."
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > And more from McAleer: "It was no coincidence that, when I asked after
                  >
                  > Wolfe a few days before Rex died, Rex confided, "he's rereading Emma."
                  >
                  > Rex ranked Emma as Jane Austen"s masterpiece. In the last weeks of his
                  >
                  > life he also reread it. That a book could be reread was to him solid
                  >
                  > proof of its worth. Thus it pleased him when P.G. Wodehouse, whom Rex
                  >
                  > admired, declared, at ninety-four, in a letter that he wrote to me, " he
                  >
                  > [Stout] passes the supreme test of being rereadable. I don't know how
                  >
                  > many times I have reread the Wolfe stories, but plenty. I know exactly
                  >
                  > what is coming and how it is all going to end, but it doesn't matter.
                  >
                  > That's writing."
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Stout's Nero Wolfe's views were more ambivalent--in /The Mother Hunt/,
                  >
                  > in chapter 12, Archie says, "Dol and Sally had been responsible, six
                  >
                  > years back, for my revision of my basic attitude toward female ops, and
                  >
                  > I held it against them, just as Wolfe held it against Jane Austen for
                  >
                  > forcing him to concede that a woman could write a good novel."
                  >
                • E.J. Ford
                  Yeah, I think I also would like to read some books with an anti-Christian agenda. Frankly, I think that the Christian point of view dominates too much of
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 6, 2011

                    Yeah, I think I also would like to read some books with an anti-Christian agenda.  Frankly, I think that the Christian point of view dominates too much of American media.

                     

                    Christians just like to whine about their underdog status when it doesn’t actually exist.

                     

                    EJ

                     

                    From: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of ofwordsandbooks
                    Sent: Sunday, February 06, 2011 2:43 AM
                    To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [NeroWolfe] Anti-Christian Agenda

                     

                     

                    Could you please give an example of an author and book that would fit your description?

                    I'm would like to read one or more.

                    Thanks!

                    --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, Terry Powell <kb9ree@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Seems to me that most of the detective type stories now-a-days are written indeed by women.  Some with a definite anti-Christian agenda, even.  As a reader of detective fiction and even the type which tout ordinary people as amateur detectives, I have to admit that none of them can hold a candle to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe novels and short stories.  Too bad there is no one I can see in these days, man or woman who is of Rex Stout's detective writing caliber.
                    > Rex is like a Canon and today's writers mostly seem like BB guns.
                    > Terry Powell
                    >
                    > --- On Fri, 12/24/10, Jim <Taylor401306@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > From: Jim <Taylor401306@...>
                    > Subject: [NeroWolfe] Fwd: [GAdetection] Rex Stout &Jane Austen
                    > To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
                    > Date: Friday, December 24, 2010, 9:11 AM
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > In a message dated 12/24/2010 7:55:05 AM Eastern Standard Time, GAdetection@yahoogroups.com writes:
                    >
                    > The following is from the introduction of "Death Times Three," written
                    >
                    > by John McAleer, Stout's biographer:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > 'During the last years of Rex Stout's life, as his authorized
                    >
                    > biographer, I received numerous letters from well-wishers and, on
                    >
                    > occasion, not-such-well-wishers, offering me advice. "Is it true," one
                    >
                    > of the letters asked, "that Stout has a secretary who writes all his
                    >
                    > stuff for him?" I showed the letter to Rex, then in his eighty-ninth
                    >
                    > year. He scanned it and said, "Tell him the name is Jane Austen, but I
                    >
                    > haven't the address." The joke was on the letter writer. Rex was
                    >
                    > classing himself with the best. Not long before that he had told me, "I
                    >
                    > used to think that men did everything better than women, but that was
                    >
                    > before I read Jane Austen. I don't think any man ever wrote better than
                    >
                    > Jane Austen."
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > In 1941, Stout wrote an article for Vogue in which he said, "a law
                    >
                    > should be passed at once prohibiting females from writing detective
                    >
                    > stories." But then he had a dream that disturbed him. Quoting McAleer:
                    >
                    > "Hence it was a shock to him when he began to dream that Jane [Austen]
                    >
                    > 'had come back to life and started writing detective stories.'"
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > In my opinion, Stout's subconscious was trying to tell him something,
                    >
                    > because subconsciously he realized what he could not quite bring to
                    >
                    > explicit awareness, which is that Emma has a full fledged shadow story
                    >
                    > (i.e., parallel fictional universe).
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Here is the Stout quote you were thinking of, but not about Pride and
                    >
                    > Prejudice--Stout speaking directly to McAleer:"[Austen] chose and
                    >
                    > handled words without the slightest attempt to assert their importance
                    >
                    > as 'literature.' She made no pretensions of any kind. She sustained
                    >
                    > suspense without strain better than any other writer of fiction."
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > And more from McAleer: "It was no coincidence that, when I asked after
                    >
                    > Wolfe a few days before Rex died, Rex confided, "he's rereading Emma."
                    >
                    > Rex ranked Emma as Jane Austen"s masterpiece. In the last weeks of his
                    >
                    > life he also reread it. That a book could be reread was to him solid
                    >
                    > proof of its worth. Thus it pleased him when P.G. Wodehouse, whom Rex
                    >
                    > admired, declared, at ninety-four, in a letter that he wrote to me, " he
                    >
                    > [Stout] passes the supreme test of being rereadable. I don't know how
                    >
                    > many times I have reread the Wolfe stories, but plenty. I know exactly
                    >
                    > what is coming and how it is all going to end, but it doesn't matter.
                    >
                    > That's writing."
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Stout's Nero Wolfe's views were more ambivalent--in /The Mother Hunt/,
                    >
                    > in chapter 12, Archie says, "Dol and Sally had been responsible, six
                    >
                    > years back, for my revision of my basic attitude toward female ops, and
                    >
                    > I held it against them, just as Wolfe held it against Jane Austen for
                    >
                    > forcing him to concede that a woman could write a good novel."
                    >

                  • ofwordsandbooks
                    Your comment is very funny and one that many would agree with. I have friends who bemoan the fact that none of their holy days are paid holidays. Also, that
                    Message 9 of 9 , Feb 6, 2011
                      Your comment is very funny and one that many would agree with. I have friends who bemoan the fact that none of their holy days are paid holidays. Also, that Judeo-Christian tradition is all-pervailing.

                      --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com, "E.J. Ford" <Edseljoe@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Yeah, I think I also would like to read some books with an anti-Christian
                      > agenda. Frankly, I think that the Christian point of view dominates too
                      > much of American media.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Christians just like to whine about their underdog status when it doesn't
                      > actually exist.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > EJ
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > From: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                      > Of ofwordsandbooks
                      > Sent: Sunday, February 06, 2011 2:43 AM
                      > To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: [NeroWolfe] Anti-Christian Agenda
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Could you please give an example of an author and book that would fit your
                      > description?
                      >
                      > I'm would like to read one or more.
                      >
                      > Thanks!
                      >
                      > --- In nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com <mailto:nerowolfe%40yahoogroups.com> ,
                      > Terry Powell <kb9ree@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Seems to me that most of the detective type stories now-a-days are written
                      > indeed by women. Some with a definite anti-Christian agenda, even. As a
                      > reader of detective fiction and even the type which tout ordinary people as
                      > amateur detectives, I have to admit that none of them can hold a candle to
                      > Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe novels and short stories. Too bad there is no one I
                      > can see in these days, man or woman who is of Rex Stout's detective writing
                      > caliber.
                      > > Rex is like a Canon and today's writers mostly seem like BB guns.
                      > > Terry Powell
                      > >
                      > > --- On Fri, 12/24/10, Jim <Taylor401306@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > From: Jim <Taylor401306@>
                      > > Subject: [NeroWolfe] Fwd: [GAdetection] Rex Stout &Jane Austen
                      > > To: nerowolfe@yahoogroups.com <mailto:nerowolfe%40yahoogroups.com>
                      > > Date: Friday, December 24, 2010, 9:11 AM
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Â
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > In a message dated 12/24/2010 7:55:05 AM Eastern Standard Time,
                      > GAdetection@yahoogroups.com <mailto:GAdetection%40yahoogroups.com> writes:
                      > >
                      > > The following is from the introduction of "Death Times Three," written
                      > >
                      > > by John McAleer, Stout's biographer:
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > 'During the last years of Rex Stout's life, as his authorized
                      > >
                      > > biographer, I received numerous letters from well-wishers and, on
                      > >
                      > > occasion, not-such-well-wishers, offering me advice. "Is it true," one
                      > >
                      > > of the letters asked, "that Stout has a secretary who writes all his
                      > >
                      > > stuff for him?" I showed the letter to Rex, then in his eighty-ninth
                      > >
                      > > year. He scanned it and said, "Tell him the name is Jane Austen, but I
                      > >
                      > > haven't the address." The joke was on the letter writer. Rex was
                      > >
                      > > classing himself with the best. Not long before that he had told me, "I
                      > >
                      > > used to think that men did everything better than women, but that was
                      > >
                      > > before I read Jane Austen. I don't think any man ever wrote better than
                      > >
                      > > Jane Austen."
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > In 1941, Stout wrote an article for Vogue in which he said, "a law
                      > >
                      > > should be passed at once prohibiting females from writing detective
                      > >
                      > > stories." But then he had a dream that disturbed him. Quoting McAleer:
                      > >
                      > > "Hence it was a shock to him when he began to dream that Jane [Austen]
                      > >
                      > > 'had come back to life and started writing detective stories.'"
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > In my opinion, Stout's subconscious was trying to tell him something,
                      > >
                      > > because subconsciously he realized what he could not quite bring to
                      > >
                      > > explicit awareness, which is that Emma has a full fledged shadow story
                      > >
                      > > (i.e., parallel fictional universe).
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Here is the Stout quote you were thinking of, but not about Pride and
                      > >
                      > > Prejudice--Stout speaking directly to McAleer:"[Austen] chose and
                      > >
                      > > handled words without the slightest attempt to assert their importance
                      > >
                      > > as 'literature.' She made no pretensions of any kind. She sustained
                      > >
                      > > suspense without strain better than any other writer of fiction."
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > And more from McAleer: "It was no coincidence that, when I asked after
                      > >
                      > > Wolfe a few days before Rex died, Rex confided, "he's rereading Emma."
                      > >
                      > > Rex ranked Emma as Jane Austen"s masterpiece. In the last weeks of his
                      > >
                      > > life he also reread it. That a book could be reread was to him solid
                      > >
                      > > proof of its worth. Thus it pleased him when P.G. Wodehouse, whom Rex
                      > >
                      > > admired, declared, at ninety-four, in a letter that he wrote to me, " he
                      > >
                      > > [Stout] passes the supreme test of being rereadable. I don't know how
                      > >
                      > > many times I have reread the Wolfe stories, but plenty. I know exactly
                      > >
                      > > what is coming and how it is all going to end, but it doesn't matter.
                      > >
                      > > That's writing."
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Stout's Nero Wolfe's views were more ambivalent--in /The Mother Hunt/,
                      > >
                      > > in chapter 12, Archie says, "Dol and Sally had been responsible, six
                      > >
                      > > years back, for my revision of my basic attitude toward female ops, and
                      > >
                      > > I held it against them, just as Wolfe held it against Jane Austen for
                      > >
                      > > forcing him to concede that a woman could write a good novel."
                      > >
                      >
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