Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [NeroWolfe] Culinary Wolfean Inquiry

Expand Messages
  • Terry Powell
    Isn t a popover just another name for a turnover. In terms of food things are named often regionally with different names here in America, but are actually
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 26, 2007
      Isn't a popover just another name for a turnover.  In terms of food things are named often regionally with different names here in America, but are actually the same thing.  For instance in one region a person might buy a soda and in another it is a pop machine.
      Don't know if this helps, but for what it is worth here it is.
      Terry Powell.
      By the way, what is the difference between chef and a  cook?

      a@... wrote:
      Hello Wolfenistas,

      I received the following inquiry from our German fellow list member
      Lutz-R., would perhaps someone be able to help? I know there are quite
      a few cooks (if not chefs) among our list members!

      Quote:

      > in the US-Book "And Four to Go", I found two recipes.

      > In the first recipe, Mrs. Vail's Baked Beans, are 1 qt. pen beans.
      > I cannot find pen beans in the dictionaries

      > Maybe they are not pen beans but pea beans!
      > It's difficult to read, the letters are blurred.

      > The 2nd recipe is called Rex Stout's FOOLPROOF POPOPVERS.
      > I cannot found Popovers in the dicitionaries.

      > Can you help me?

      > Greetings from Braunschweig / Germany
      > Lutz-R.

      Unquote.

      ["I told you not to use that word in my presence, Archie!" he thundered.]

      --
      Yours,
      Alex.
      http://stout. avenarius. sk

      [processed by "The Bat!", Version 3.80.06]




      "but what does it say? "The Word is near you: it is in you rmouth and in your heart, that is the Word of faith we are proclaiming: That if you confess with you rmouth, "Jesus is Lord", and believe in your heart that God has raised Him from the dead, you will be saved. For it is with your heart that you believe and are justified, and it is with your mouth that you confess and are saved. Romans 10:8-10. Verse 13: for "Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved."


      Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.

    • a@avenarius.sk
      ... Probably not. In the meantime, we ve come up with some answers that seem to explain the origin of the term popover . See the Webster definition quoted
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 2, 2008
        On Wednesday, 26th December 2007 at 14:40:42 (GMT -0800 PST), Terry Powell wrote:

        > Isn't a popover just another name for a turnover.

        Probably not. In the meantime, we've come up with some answers
        that seem to explain the origin of the term "popover". See the Webster
        definition quoted here:

        http://avenarius.sk/forum/viewtopic.php?t=485

        When you compare that with the definition of "turnover" (number 3):

        http://www.answers.com/turnover?cat=biz-fin&nafid=3

        they seem to be two different things.

        > By the way, what is the difference between chef and a cook?

        A "chef" can probably be defined as a "head cook". Of course, if there's only
        one cook (Fritz Brenner), I suppose we might call him both a cook and a chef?

        --
        Yours,
        Alex.
        http://stout.avenarius.sk

        [processed by "The Bat!", Version 3.80.06]
      • Terry Powell
        ok, thanks I did a little checking on my own and that is correct. They are two different things. Terry Powell a@avenarius.sk wrote: ... Probably not. In the
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 2, 2008
          ok, thanks I did a little checking on my own and that is correct. They are two different things.
          Terry Powell

          a@... wrote:
          On Wednesday, 26th December 2007 at 14:40:42 (GMT -0800 PST), Terry Powell wrote:

          > Isn't a popover just another name for a turnover.

          Probably not. In the meantime, we've come up with some answers
          that seem to explain the origin of the term "popover". See the Webster
          definition quoted here:

          http://avenarius. sk/forum/ viewtopic. php?t=485

          When you compare that with the definition of "turnover" (number 3):

          http://www.answers. com/turnover? cat=biz-fin& nafid=3

          they seem to be two different things.

          > By the way, what is the difference between chef and a cook?

          A "chef" can probably be defined as a "head cook". Of course, if there's only
          one cook (Fritz Brenner), I suppose we might call him both a cook and a chef?

          --
          Yours,
          Alex.
          http://stout. avenarius. sk

          [processed by "The Bat!", Version 3.80.06]



          Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.

        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.