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Group Description

This group is tracing interactively, the history of the rise of the Aten and the revolutionary Amarna Period (1353 - 1336 BC), from the overturning of philosophical and cultural roots founded in the early Dynastic culture that sprang from Abydos, in Egypt. Observing the short flourish of the Amarna culture, as well as Tutankhamen's additions to Thebes, the New Kingdom period of Seti I & Rameses II, who razed, reviled and vilified the memory of the Aten and returned to Abydos.



This unfolding story is emerging through the development of contemporary research into Egyptian archaeology, astronomy and architecture. Our present records of the Amarna Period, reveal a pervasive legacy of distinctly figurative and mannerist-style legacies in art, sculpture, ornamentation, decor, poetry, hymns, architecture, light and design; to the more abstract concepts developed in their monotheism and society. The surviving artifacts are unique in Egyptian culture, in that they still readily convey the emotive mood of the of their creators.



Based on the evidence of current archaeological observations of the limited extant records, artifacts, tablets, architectural reconstructions and academic discussions, this group is seeking to unravel some of the mysteries surrounding Akhenaten and his family in Akhetaten. Although, the focus of our work is drawn to educational topics, there will be many and varied themes posted upon the 'sidelines' of Egyptian history and culture.



If this topic and it's themes are of interest to you, ...please apply to join this GROUP!



Regards,

Richard Grosser,



Moderator

10/01/10

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