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Re: Burkert: Babylon Memphis Persepolis: Eastern Contexts of Greek Culture, ktl

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  • Melanie B. Mineo
    Interesting - Thanks, Curt. I very much appreciate your comments on this subject. For Giannis: We all know the Egyptian origins of Plotinus. Can we suppose
    Message 1 of 59 , Aug 15, 2005
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      Interesting - Thanks, Curt. I very much appreciate your comments on
      this subject.

      For Giannis:

      "We all know the Egyptian origins of Plotinus. Can we suppose that
      Plotinus is relying on a kind of personal knowledge/experience?"

      You mean first-hand experience of hieroglyphic writing, due to his
      Egyptian origins - hence his comments?

      Re this subject of "relying on a kind of personal
      knowledge/experience," do we all accept that he had an embodied,
      phenomenological knowledge of the particulars of mystical experience?
      Or are there still some holding out on that one?

      First there is the phenomenon, internal and/or external, then the
      attempt to explain it, interpret it, deny it, symbolize it, mythologize
      it, ktl? (I'm thinking of Dennis's questions here, re Prometheus,
      Epimetheus, Zeus, etc) Thoughts/comments on this? Anyone seen the
      History Channel piece Ancient Monster Hunters?

      Could it be that phenomenological similarity of certain myths (we've
      been discussing Demeter/Isis, but there are others) arise from the
      embodied human condition? Think of the notion of the philosophia
      perennis, the prisca theologia of Ficino, etc. Though it takes
      different forms in different cultures, proponents hold that the
      �Tradition is One.� Such truths have been argued to be timeless and
      recurring because they arise from the embodied human condition itself.
      Are these cultural variations tailored from a universal psychological
      dynamic, a naturalistic, developmental tendency whose end is the
      gnostic reunion with the dunamis of being variously called God, Zeus,
      Demeter, Isis, whatever? Moreover, one wonders, in trying to uncover
      the history of these matters, how much is real historical connection
      between different cultural streams of thought, and how much is due to
      the fact that those who �turn within� discover (and keep discovering)
      for themselves the same inner psychological and 'divine' truths? It
      must be made quite clear that the psychologia perennis proposed here is
      not seen to be universal in that all individuals conform to it in the
      sense of moving through it, either in unison or of necessity, without
      variation. Instead, it is used in the sense of a prototype, a
      �universal� around which individual variability can be ordered, hence
      similarity in myth motifs. M


      On Monday, August 15, 2005, at 10:32 AM, curt wrote:

      > Burkert's book is very good - but Levine's review of it is
      > another matter. It is rather odd that a review of this book
      > should be used as an excuse to attack Martin Bernal. In
      > fact, Burkert does address the Black Athena debate in his
      > book - but the way he does so is completely different from
      > the way in which Levine addresses the issue in her review.
      > Clearly, Levine is misusing this review to promote her own
      > criticisms of Bernal.
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • gregshaw58
      Thanks Tim. Let me say that in the Penelope Weaving thread I found your entries to be most illuminating and I think they stirred up some fine responses all
      Message 59 of 59 , Dec 16, 2009
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        Thanks Tim.

        Let me say that in the Penelope Weaving thread I found your entries to be most illuminating and I think they stirred up some fine responses all around. Great stuff.

        And thanks for getting those commentaries out at such reasonable prices

        Greg

        --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, Tim Addey <tim@...> wrote:
        >
        > Sorry Greg this volume is still having its updates checked, so we
        > haven't gone to press as yet.... I guess its now more likely to be mid
        > January before we get it back from the printers. And then a least a
        > week before we can get a supply to Opening Mind.
        >
        >
        > gregshaw58 wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > A question for Tim Addey... On the Prometheus Trust website it lists
        > > the following:
        > >
        > > Our next volume in the Platonic Texts and Translations Series will be
        > > Damascius Lectures on the Philebus. We expect this to be available
        > > from mid-December at £18. ISBN 978 1898910 48 0 176pp
        > >
        > > I wanted to order this from Opening Mind, the US distributor of your
        > > books, but as yet it is not listed. Can you give us an idea when the
        > > Philebus commentary will be available?
        > >
        > > thanks,
        > > Greg Shaw
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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