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  • lupoinvincibile
    Hello, My name is Beniamino Massimo di Dario, and I live in Italy. I am Doctor in Literature and Philosophy. I am an italian student of Neoplatonism, and a
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 17, 2005
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      Hello,
      My name is Beniamino Massimo di Dario, and I live in Italy.
      I am Doctor in Literature and Philosophy.
      I am an italian student of Neoplatonism, and a "neoplatonic
      thinker".
      My english is not perfect, so I've decided to sign me in this list,
      more than other, as a "listener".
      I am particolarly interested in all pagan neoplatonic thinkers,
      particularly in Iamblichus' philosophy and his figure.
      I've published some studies, not strictly Philosophical,
      on Julius Evola, on the emperor Aurelian, and is imminent
      an edition with a commentary of the "Notitia Dignitatum".

      For the future I preview to totally dedicate my studies to
      neopatonic philosophy.

      Regards
      .:|BMD|:.
    • Scott M. Sullivan
      Could someone give me just a very brief rundown, perhaps with just a couple of citations of the Neoplatonics who placed Forms as Ideas in the divine mind?
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 17, 2005
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        Could someone give me just a very brief rundown, perhaps with just a couple of citations of the Neoplatonics who placed Forms as Ideas in the divine mind?

        thanks
        Scott

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • John Dilon
        ... Good for you, Beniamino! Welcome to the club. John Dillon
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 19, 2005
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          on 17/6/05 12:54, lupoinvincibile at lupoinvincibile@... wrote:

          > Hello,
          > My name is Beniamino Massimo di Dario, and I live in Italy.
          > I am Doctor in Literature and Philosophy.
          > I am an italian student of Neoplatonism, and a "neoplatonic
          > thinker".
          > My english is not perfect, so I've decided to sign me in this list,
          > more than other, as a "listener".
          > I am particolarly interested in all pagan neoplatonic thinkers,
          > particularly in Iamblichus' philosophy and his figure.
          > I've published some studies, not strictly Philosophical,
          > on Julius Evola, on the emperor Aurelian, and is imminent
          > an edition with a commentary of the "Notitia Dignitatum".
          >
          > For the future I preview to totally dedicate my studies to
          > neopatonic philosophy.
          >
          > Regards
          > ..:|BMD|:.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          Good for you, Beniamino! Welcome to the club. John Dillon
        • John Dilon
          ... First clear evidences Philo of Alexandria and Alcinous (but also Varro, follower of Antiochus of Ascalon, as testified to by Augustine), but I think really
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 19, 2005
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            on 17/6/05 16:34, Scott M. Sullivan at clansullivan@... wrote:

            > Could someone give me just a very brief rundown, perhaps with just a couple of
            > citations of the Neoplatonics who placed Forms as Ideas in the divine mind?
            >
            > thanks
            > Scott
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            First clear evidences Philo of Alexandria and Alcinous (but also Varro,
            follower of Antiochus of Ascalon, as testified to by Augustine), but I think
            really Xenocrates already in the Old Academy. John Dillon
          • aousager
            ... just a couple of ... divine mind? ... Varro, ... but I think ... According to the argument of my book, Asger Ousager Plotinus on Selfhood, Freedom and
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 21, 2005
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              --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, John Dilon <jmdillon@e...>
              wrote:
              > on 17/6/05 16:34, Scott M. Sullivan at clansullivan@h... wrote:
              >
              > > Could someone give me just a very brief rundown, perhaps with
              just a couple of
              > > citations of the Neoplatonics who placed Forms as Ideas in the
              divine mind?
              > >
              > > thanks
              > > Scott
              > >

              > First clear evidences Philo of Alexandria and Alcinous (but also
              Varro,
              > follower of Antiochus of Ascalon, as testified to by Augustine),
              but I think
              > really Xenocrates already in the Old Academy. John Dillon

              According to the argument of my book, Asger Ousager "Plotinus on
              Selfhood, Freedom and Politics" (Aarhus University Press 2004) pp.
              28-9, 54, Plotinus had quite good reasons to believe that the
              doctrine is already present and apparent in the master, Plato.
              In many places all over his work, Plato more than alludes to the
              existence of a divine Intellect, notably, e.g., in the Phaedo (97c-
              98c). In the Philebus (22b), for instance, he explicitly
              distinguishes the particular human intellect from divine, universal
              Intellect.
              In the Timaeus (30c-31a, 39e), the Living Being – corresponding to
              his argument in the Sophist (248e-249b) of the highest Being as
              alive and thinking – is described as particularised by the
              discernment of divine Intellect into a manifold of living Beings,
              i.e. into Forms. Presumably, then, this manifold of Beings is not
              only alive but thinking as well. Confirmation is found in the
              Parmenides, where, in line with the suggestions of the Sophist,
              Forms are each of them suggested to be thinking (panta noein 132b-
              c). In that case, according to the Platonic genus-species pattern,
              they must all belong to divine Intellect (nous).
              Partly following the interpretation of Malcolm Schofield in his
              article 'Likeness and Likenesses in the Parmenides' (1996), though
              suffering some ironical ridicule, this tentative suggestion is not
              really dismissed but rather developed and improved during the
              dialogue. Right after (133b-134e), for instance, the significant
              distinction between human knowledge and divine knowledge is
              introduced. If we reverse the absurd consequences of the absolute
              distinction between these fields of knowledge, we must conclude,
              following also the argument of the Meno (especially 80d-e), that
              humans with their narrow intellects do indeed each of them have some
              access to perfect knowledge and, therefore, some access to divine
              Intellect as well – perfect knowledge being a distinction of divine
              Intellect. The Forms are alive and thinking within that divine
              Intellect, which, according to the suggestions of both the Charmides
              and the Timaeus, is continuously performing divine self-intellection.

              Yours sincerely,

              Asger Ousager
              PhD, Assistant Professor
              Nobelparken 461-328
              University of Aarhus
              Denmark
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