Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

International Symposion: Platonism and Forms of Intelligence; Hvar, Croatia; October 9-13, 2006

Expand Messages
  • Lise Zovko
    Call for Papers International Symposion of the Institute of Philosophy, Zagreb in Hvar, Croatia. October 9-13, 2006 Platonism and Forms of Intelligence / Le
    Message 1 of 1 , May 2, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Call for Papers



      International Symposion of the Institute of Philosophy, Zagreb

      in Hvar, Croatia. October 9-13, 2006



      Platonism and Forms of Intelligence / Le platonisme et les formes d'intelligence / Platonismus und Formen der Intelligenz / Il platonismo e le forme dell'intelligenza



      What forms does intelligence take? How does it enable us to know, to feel and to act? The Platonic doctrine of ideas or forms has its roots in a comprehensive understanding of the activity of human intelligence, of its ability to access and utilize the contents of experience in order to establish a coherent view of reality, direct our decisions and behaviour and inspire our creative productivity. From its inception in the presocratic paradigmata of Platonic thought to its modern representatives in rationalist and idealist philosophy, Platonism and those thinkers closely associated with Platonism - among them, Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Nicolas Cusanus, Spinoza, Schelling, Hegel and Franz von Baader - have differentiated levels and types of human intelligence: receptive and (re-)productive or spontaneous, intentional and conceptual, argumentative or discursive and intuitive or analogical - recognizing the distinct importance of each and the proportionality expressed by their interconnections, their intercommunication and their mutual cooperation.



      For Plato and the Platonists, epistemology is not separate from ontology, knowledge from reality, because cognition itself is recognized as the most essential aspect of reality. At the same time, for Platonism, intelligence represents the unique means by which we approach and attain to reality, both the reality which intelligence itself is and that to which it refers. In distinguishing various levels of cognition and their specific modes of (co-)operation and intercommunication, Platonist philosophy thus recognizes and differentiates an inherent diversity in the quality and content of experience, i.e. specific aspects of reality corresponding to each aspect of intelligence and specific ways in which we approach and utilize the different aspects of reality which each individually and all in their entirety convey.



      The Platonic theory of intelligence played a determining role in the development of scientific method (by defining the role of hypothesis and experiment in the investigation of phenomena; by differentiating between observation and explanation, deduction and argument, reasons and causes). In their reflections on the relationship of intelligence and its objects, Platonist philosophers also anticipate many of the most significant theoretical advances of modern scientific theory (for example, the theory of relativity and the principle of indeterminacy). Platonist views on intelligence can be shown, furthermore, to have had a marked influence on Kant and a number of other ostensible counterexamples to Platonic philosophy, providing a unique opportunity to more fully comprehend the genuine import of those systems of thought. Not only in a methodological or historical sense, however, do Platonic views on intelligence prove relevant to current research. Fundamental research in the physical and life sciences tends to confirm the Platonic "analogy of intelligence", i.e. the heuristic and paradigmatic role of something like human intelligence for an understanding of the genesis and structure of the universe as well as of the emergence and organisation of the individual beings which comprise it. Finally, recent investigation into the role certain types of intelligence play in artistic production and art appreciation provides its own form of experimental evidence for the Platonist view of the interconnectivity and intercommunication of gradual and hierarchical levels of intelligence.



      The international symposion Forms of Intelligence in Platonism invites participants to contribute to the discussion of this topic papers devoted to some aspect of the investigation of human intelligence as related to Platonist philosophy, i.e. of the forms of intelligent activity, its expressions, its objects and its products, as developed in the works of Plato or one of the later representatives of Platonist philosophy, and with respect to some aspect of the analogy of intelligence writ large, that is, as discoverable in the methodology or results of scientific research on cognitive or natural processes, or in the products of human creativity and the manner of their production. The topic of the symposion has been thus broadly formulated with the intention of providing a conceptual framework for future discussions/symposia in this area of research. The specific emphasis of this year's symposion will be determined pursuant to the review of individual submissions, but may include papers from any of the thematic areas named below.



      Papers/abstracts of proposed papers may be submitted dealing with any of the following thematic clusters. Each cluster represents a suggested emphasis or area of discussion falling within the scope of the main topic of the symposion. The specific topic and specific philosophers dealt with in individual papers will depend on the particular interests of the contributors.



      I. Logos and Phenomena: Observation, Explanation and Identifiable Aspects of Intelligence in Platonism and in the Methodology of the Experimental Sciences



      II. Soma, Psyche, Nous: Platonism on Intelligence, Life and the Organisation of Living Things (The Mind-Body Problem and Emergent Forms of Intelligence According to Platonism/the Life Sciences)



      III. Noesis and Energia: Intelligence and the Conceivability of the Workings of the Universe (Contemporary Physical Theory and Platonist Philosophy)



      IV. Aitia, Epistemes and Dynamis Panton: Intuition, Analogy, Paradox and the Intelligibility of Concepts of God According to Platonism



      V. Logos and Poietika: Intelligence, Creativity and the Products of Creativity (Platonism and Recent Work in the Area of Aesthetics/Cognitive Processes)



      The organisational committee will determine the selection of invited papers; the definitive program of the symposion will be determined on the basis of that selection.



      Interested scholars are asked to submit completed papers and/or an abstract of a proposed paper consisting of no more than 200 words, together the following information, by October 1, 2005:



      1. author's name and institutional affiliation (if any)

      2. mailing address, e-mail address, telephone number

      3. short bibliography of publications relevant to the topic (books or articles in international journals)



      The organisational committee will review all submissions and determine a selection of invited speakers. Notification of the selection of invited speakers will be sent no later than December 15, 2005. The finalized program along with the schedule of lectures and discussions will be sent to all participants by January 30, 2006. Meals and accommodation (4 x single room) as well as a percentage of travel costs (to be determined by need and/or on the basis of funds/travel stipends able to be provided by the participant's own institution or other foundations in the speaker's home country) for invited speakers will be paid by the organizing committee, i.e. the Institute of Philosophy, Zagreb and its sponsors. Other interested parties may register to participate in the symposium for a fee of 100-120 Euros, which covers participation in coffees, evening meals and the excursion. Except for invited speakers, the cost for accommodation and meals is to be born by the participant. Room reservations for participants not holding papers may be made through the organizing committee or by contacting the tourist information board of the City of Hvar, Croatia.



      Invited papers will be published as by the Institute of Philosophy, Zagreb as the Proceedings of the International Symposion Forms of Intelligence. The Organizing Committee requests that all manuscripts/abstracts be mailed or faxed to:



      Dr. Marie-Élise Zovko

      Institute of Philosophy (http://www.ifzg.hr/)

      Ulica grada Vukovara 54

      HR-10 000 Zagreb

      Croatia

      e-mail: marie-elise.zovko@...

      Fax: ++385 /1 / 6150 338



      Contributions may be in English, German, French, Italian or Croatian. For papers in Croatian, simultaneous translation into English will be provided for by the contributor.



      Tentative Program:



      October 9, 2006 afternoon, evening: arrival in Hvar via Split; informal reception in Hotel Adriatic (Accomodation in Hotel Adriatic, A category)



      October 10, 2006



      8:00 first lecture and discussion



      9:00 second lecture and discussion



      10:00 coffee break



      10:30 third lecture and discussion



      11:30 fourth lecture and discussion



      13:00 lunch



      afternoon free



      16:00 tour of historic Hvar Arsenal and Theatre, one of oldest preserved enclosed theatres in Europe



      17:00 evening lecture



      18:00 discussion forum



      19:30 dinner



      October 11, 2006



      8:00 first lecture and discussion



      9:00 second lecture and discussion



      10:00 coffee break



      10:30 third lecture and discussion



      11:30 fourth lecture and discussion



      13:00 lunch



      afternoon free



      16:00 the Bell Towers of Hvar: historic tour of Franciscan monastery and Church, together with its museum



      17:00 evening lecture, museum/former refectory of Franciscan monastery



      18:00 discussion forum (selected topic)



      19:00 dinner



      21:00 concert/theater (according to city of Hvar offering)



      October 12, 2006



      8:00 first lecture and discussion



      9:00 second lecture and discussion



      10:00 coffee break



      10:30 third lecture and discussion



      11:30 fourth lecture and discussion



      13:00 lunch



      afternoon free



      16:00 tour of Cathedral of St. Stephen's, Hvar and Museum; summer residence of Hanibal Lucic; Palace of Peter Hektorovic





      17:00 evening lecture



      18:00 discussion forum (selected topic)



      October 13, 2006



      Excursion to Stari Grad/Humac/Grapceva Caves



      Theme: "The Way Up and the Way Back are the Same: The Ascent of Cognition in Plato's Analogies of the Line and Cave and the Forms Intelligence Takes"



      Schedule:

      9:00 departure from Hvar with bus and tour guide, agency Pelegrin, Hvar



      Visit to Stari Grad, guided tour of the villa of Petar Hektorovic (Croatian poet, nobleman, connaisseur of Latin language and classical literature; wrote his Ribanje i ribarsko prigovaranje, the first realistic epic poem of Croatian Renaissance literature, in 1568. It provides four folk tunes accompanied with musical notation. English translation by Edward Dennis Goy: Fishing and fishermans' conversation.)



      ca: 10:30 departure for Village Humac, lunch in Humac, walk to the Grapceva caves, guided tour of caves



      return to Hvar around 20.00


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.