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Re: [neoplatonism] Fwd: Panels for the 2013 ISNS Conference in Cardiff

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  • david.gallagher70
    Mike, Does Agent Intellect correlate with Universal Soul, or the living being ? I ve been reading-contemplating Enneads IV. 5, and now wonder whether any of
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 2, 2013
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      Mike,

      Does Agent Intellect correlate with Universal Soul, or "the living being"?
      I've been reading-contemplating Enneads IV. 5, and now wonder whether any
      of what you related can be connected with Plotinus's doctrine "that
      perception is due to the sympathy which unites the parts of the great living
      organism which is the physical universe." (Armstrong's footnote at the end of
      IV. 5. 8). Tentatively, it further seems to me that if we understand
      correctly what Plotinus means by "sympathy", we might 'sympathetically' better
      apprehend what he means by 'affections'.

      Advance thanks,

      David


      In a message dated 2/2/2013 3:13:39 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
      goya@... writes:




      Friends,

      I'm currently learning a whole lot by translating the latest work by the
      great scholar Ilsetraut Hadot on the notion of the harmonization of Plato
      and Aristotle in Neoplatonism. For instance, there's a reference to the
      following work, which I haven't seen but will, I suspect, be of interest
      to Dennis Clark:

      Andolfo, Matteo, L’Uno e il tutto. La sapienzia egizia presso i Greci, 2008

      Have also been reading one of two new translations of the works of
      al-Farabi by the somewhat (about 50 years) younger scholar Philippe
      Vallat: Al-Farabi, Epitre sur l'intellect, Paris: Les Belles Lettres 2012.
      This is a brilliant work, consisting of a substantive introduction, a
      translation of the brief Risala fi-l-‘aql, and above all a very long essay
      on "L'intellect et les intellects chez Farabi". Vallat had already shown
      in his 2004 work Farabi et l'Ecole d'Alexandrie that this great
      philosopher was basically a Neoplatonist carrying on the tradition of the
      late Alexandrian commentators. Now, he concentrates on the junction
      between epistemology and metaphysics, showing, inter multa alia, that "the
      goal of the forms of the world is thus that they may be thought by man,
      once he has become intellect in itself" (p. 150). In other words, the
      entire goal of the process by means of which the Agent Intellect inserts
      the forms within matter, thus constituting the sensible world, is so that
      human beings may (with the help of the same Agent Intellect) render this
      these forms intelligible once again by thinking them, that is, by
      re-abstracting them from matter.

      Brilliant stuff. My only qualifier would be that I think Farabi gets most
      of his ideas not from Plotinus, Syrianus and Proclus, as Vallat thinks,
      but from Porphyry. But that would take a lot of work to prove...

      Best, Mike

      >
      Michael Chase
      CNRS UPR 76
      Paris-Villejuif
      France






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • vaeringjar
      ... Thanks, Michael - I have in fact now ordered that book, and I was not familiar with it til you brought it to our attention. I am certainly curious about
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 4, 2013
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        --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, "Goya" wrote:
        >
        > Friends,
        >
        > I'm currently learning a whole lot by translating the latest work by the
        > great scholar Ilsetraut Hadot on the notion of the harmonization of Plato
        > and Aristotle in Neoplatonism. For instance, there's a reference to the
        > following work, which I haven't seen but will, I suspect, be of interest
        > to Dennis Clark:
        >
        > Andolfo, Matteo, L'Uno e il tutto. La sapienzia egizia presso i Greci, 2008
        >
        > Have also been reading one of two new translations of the works of
        > al-Farabi by the somewhat (about 50 years) younger scholar Philippe
        > Vallat: Al-Farabi, Epitre sur l'intellect, Paris: Les Belles Lettres 2012.
        > This is a brilliant work, consisting of a substantive introduction, a
        > translation of the brief Risala fi-l-`aql, and above all a very long essay
        > on "L'intellect et les intellects chez Farabi". Vallat had already shown
        > in his 2004 work Farabi et l'Ecole d'Alexandrie that this great
        > philosopher was basically a Neoplatonist carrying on the tradition of the
        > late Alexandrian commentators. Now, he concentrates on the junction
        > between epistemology and metaphysics, showing, inter multa alia, that "the
        > goal of the forms of the world is thus that they may be thought by man,
        > once he has become intellect in itself" (p. 150). In other words, the
        > entire goal of the process by means of which the Agent Intellect inserts
        > the forms within matter, thus constituting the sensible world, is so that
        > human beings may (with the help of the same Agent Intellect) render this
        > these forms intelligible once again by thinking them, that is, by
        > re-abstracting them from matter.
        >
        > Brilliant stuff. My only qualifier would be that I think Farabi gets most
        > of his ideas not from Plotinus, Syrianus and Proclus, as Vallat thinks,
        > but from Porphyry. But that would take a lot of work to prove...
        >
        > Best, Mike
        >
        >
        > >
        > Michael Chase
        > CNRS UPR 76
        > Paris-Villejuif
        > France
        >

        Thanks, Michael - I have in fact now ordered that book, and I was not familiar with it til you brought it to our attention. I am certainly curious about it, and when it arrives I will post something about it. Trying to catch up on several things this work, and am still looking at Madame Oreal's contribution to the Porphyry Bude.

        Dennis Clark
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