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Re: [neoplatonism] Where to start with Proclus

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  • Ted Hand
    There s also a nice SEP article http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/proclus/ I would start with Elements, proceed to Euclid and Timaeus before moving on to
    Message 1 of 11 , Jan 13, 2013
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      There's also a nice SEP article http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/proclus/

      I would start with Elements, proceed to Euclid and Timaeus before moving on
      to Theology+Parmenides

      On Sun, Jan 13, 2013 at 12:27 PM, John Dillon <jmdillon@...> wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi there,
      > >
      > > I got in front of me almost the complet works of Proclus and want to
      > start
      > > reading soon. So I thought I might first ask the experts to consult me
      > on a
      > > reading order. This is my plan for now:
      > >
      > > 1) Theology of Plato
      > > 2) Elements of Theology
      > > 3) Commentary on Parmenides
      > > 4) Commentary on Timaios
      > > 5) Commentary on Euclid
      > > 6) Commentary on Alkibiades
      > >
      > > Thanks for any hints on altering this order,
      > >
      > > Marco Bormann
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > Or, at the same time, you could always start with a good book on him, such
      > as now Radek Chlup�s Proclus. JMD
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • vaeringjar
      ... If I may also make some suggestions, admittedly in the face of the much more expert opinion offered, all of which I agree with personally and as someone
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 14, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, John Dillon wrote:
        >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Hi there,
        > >
        > > I got in front of me almost the complet works of Proclus and want to start
        > > reading soon. So I thought I might first ask the experts to consult me on a
        > > reading order. This is my plan for now:
        > >
        > > 1) Theology of Plato
        > > 2) Elements of Theology
        > > 3) Commentary on Parmenides
        > > 4) Commentary on Timaios
        > > 5) Commentary on Euclid
        > > 6) Commentary on Alkibiades
        > >
        > > Thanks for any hints on altering this order,
        > >
        > > Marco Bormann
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > Or, at the same time, you could always start with a good book on him, such
        > as now Radek Chlup¹s Proclus. JMD
        >

        If I may also make some suggestions, admittedly in the face of the much more expert opinion offered, all of which I agree with personally and as someone totally autodidact in his study of Proclus, such as it as been - I would not start with the Platonic Theology and then the Elements - though if I had to choose between the two, I would say start with the Elements - I have studied them quite a bit, over the years, but more almost as a reference from other works. But Dodd's notes are so helpful, and not just for Proclus. What a masterful work his edition is. Still impresses me, every time I pick it up.

        But I certainly agree about Radek Chlup's book, the place to start now, but to be honest, even before it, I think the best and shorter introduction and where I at least wish I had started is the chapter on Proclus by Giovanni Reale in his History of Ancient Philosophy:

        http://books.google.com/books/about/Schools_Imprl_Age_V4.html?id=eX-8XOn3GYUC

        It should be easy enough to obtain. He writes so clearly, and it's not very long. (I have not read his book on Proclus, which I believe has not been translated into English: Reale, G., Introduzione a Proclo, Roma-Bari: Laterza.)

        But even before that, if you haven't read it, definitely the entry in the Stanford online Encyclopedia by Christoph Helmig and Carlos Steel

        http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/proclus/

        and Carlos Steel's article in the new Cambridge history:

        Steel, C., 2011, "Proclus," in The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late Antiquity, L. Gerson (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, vol. 2, pp. 630–653.

        Good luck!

        Dennis Clark
      • david.gallagher70
        Wondering what others might think about adding G.R.S. Mead, Orpheus, to the pre-reading recommendation list. Text link:
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 14, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Wondering what others might think about adding G.R.S. Mead, Orpheus, to
          the pre-reading recommendation list.

          Text link: _http://archive.org/details/orpheus00meadgoog_
          (http://archive.org/details/orpheus00meadgoog)

          Sorting out the multiplicity of gods in PT is a challenge. The figures in
          Mead might prove helpful, especially in connection with the hierarchies of
          triads.

          Our group created a diagram of the intelligible gods on a large white board
          that helped us get a handle on it all. We started with Mead, then fleshed
          it out through study of PT. Quite an adventure. I have a photo of our
          white board, if interested, and my colleagues are willing to share it.

          David Gallagher
          _Astronoesis_ (http://www.larsonpublications.com/book-details.php?id=50)
          Class Member, _Wisdom's Goldenrod Center for Philosophic Studies_
          (http://wisdomsgoldenrod.org/)





          In a message dated 1/14/2013 2:12:25 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, vaerin
          gjar@... writes:






          --- In _neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com)
          , John Dillon wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Hi there,
          > >
          > > I got in front of me almost the complet works of Proclus and want to
          start
          > > reading soon. So I thought I might first ask the experts to consult me
          on a
          > > reading order. This is my plan for now:
          > >
          > > 1) Theology of Plato
          > > 2) Elements of Theology
          > > 3) Commentary on Parmenides
          > > 4) Commentary on Timaios
          > > 5) Commentary on Euclid
          > > 6) Commentary on Alkibiades
          > >
          > > Thanks for any hints on altering this order,
          > >
          > > Marco Bormann
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          > Or, at the same time, you could always start with a good book on him,
          such
          > as now Radek Chlup¹s Proclus. JMD
          >

          If I may also make some suggestions, admittedly in the face of the much
          more expert opinion offered, all of which I agree with personally and as
          someone totally autodidact in his study of Proclus, such as it as been - I
          would not start with the Platonic Theology and then the Elements - though if I
          had to choose between the two, I would say start with the Elements - I have
          studied them quite a bit, over the years, but more almost as a reference
          from other works. But Dodd's notes are so helpful, and not just for Proclus.
          What a masterful work his edition is. Still impresses me, every time I
          pick it up.

          But I certainly agree about Radek Chlup's book, the place to start now,
          but to be honest, even before it, I think the best and shorter introduction
          and where I at least wish I had started is the chapter on Proclus by
          Giovanni Reale in his History of Ancient Philosophy:

          _http://books.google.com/books/about/Schools_Imprl_Age_V4.html?id=eX-8XOn3GY
          UC_
          (http://books.google.com/books/about/Schools_Imprl_Age_V4.html?id=eX-8XOn3GYUC)

          It should be easy enough to obtain. He writes so clearly, and it's not
          very long. (I have not read his book on Proclus, which I believe has not been
          translated into English: Reale, G., Introduzione a Proclo, Roma-Bari:
          Laterza.)

          But even before that, if you haven't read it, definitely the entry in the
          Stanford online Encyclopedia by Christoph Helmig and Carlos Steel

          _http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/proclus/_
          (http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/proclus/)

          and Carlos Steel's article in the new Cambridge history:

          Steel, C., 2011, "Proclus," in The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late
          Antiquity, L. Gerson (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, vol. 2,
          pp. 630–653.

          Good luck!

          Dennis Clark






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jim Schumacher
          The place to start is with the Elements of Theology. This is somewhere between an introduction and an outline, so it helps to do some collateral reading: Radek
          Message 4 of 11 , Jan 14, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            The place to start is with the Elements of Theology. This is somewhere
            between an introduction and an outline, so it helps to do some
            collateral reading: Radek Chlup's "Proclus" plus two books that Chlup
            finds useful: "A Study of Spiritual Motion in the Philosophy of
            Proclus" by Stephen Gersh and Edward Butler's doctoral dissertation,
            "The Metaphysics of Polytheism in Proclus" which may be downloaded
            from henadology.wordpress.com.

            You are going to want to go back to the Elements periodically, but
            after a first reading I would recommend the Parmenides commentary.
            After that the Euclid and Timaeus commentaries, in that order.

            The Platonic Theology should be last as the most difficult.

            And save the Alcibiades commentary for when you get frazzled and want
            to read something lighter.

            Jim Schumacher



            On Jan 14, 2013, at 2:48 PM, dgallagher@... wrote:

            > Wondering what others might think about adding G.R.S. Mead, Orpheus,
            > to
            > the pre-reading recommendation list.
            >
            > Text link: _http://archive.org/details/orpheus00meadgoog_
            > (http://archive.org/details/orpheus00meadgoog)
            >
            > Sorting out the multiplicity of gods in PT is a challenge. The
            > figures in
            > Mead might prove helpful, especially in connection with the
            > hierarchies of
            > triads.
            >
            > Our group created a diagram of the intelligible gods on a large
            > white board
            > that helped us get a handle on it all. We started with Mead, then
            > fleshed
            > it out through study of PT. Quite an adventure. I have a photo of our
            > white board, if interested, and my colleagues are willing to share it.
            >
            > David Gallagher
            > _Astronoesis_ (http://www.larsonpublications.com/book-details.php?id=50
            > )
            > Class Member, _Wisdom's Goldenrod Center for Philosophic Studies_
            > (http://wisdomsgoldenrod.org/)
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > In a message dated 1/14/2013 2:12:25 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
            > vaerin
            > gjar@... writes:
            >
            > --- In _neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
            > )
            > , John Dillon wrote:
            > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Hi there,
            > > >
            > > > I got in front of me almost the complet works of Proclus and
            > want to
            > start
            > > > reading soon. So I thought I might first ask the experts to
            > consult me
            > on a
            > > > reading order. This is my plan for now:
            > > >
            > > > 1) Theology of Plato
            > > > 2) Elements of Theology
            > > > 3) Commentary on Parmenides
            > > > 4) Commentary on Timaios
            > > > 5) Commentary on Euclid
            > > > 6) Commentary on Alkibiades
            > > >
            > > > Thanks for any hints on altering this order,
            > > >
            > > > Marco Bormann
            > > >
            > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > > Or, at the same time, you could always start with a good book on
            > him,
            > such
            > > as now Radek Chlup�s Proclus. JMD
            > >
            >
            > If I may also make some suggestions, admittedly in the face of the
            > much
            > more expert opinion offered, all of which I agree with personally
            > and as
            > someone totally autodidact in his study of Proclus, such as it as
            > been - I
            > would not start with the Platonic Theology and then the Elements -
            > though if I
            > had to choose between the two, I would say start with the Elements -
            > I have
            > studied them quite a bit, over the years, but more almost as a
            > reference
            > from other works. But Dodd's notes are so helpful, and not just for
            > Proclus.
            > What a masterful work his edition is. Still impresses me, every time I
            > pick it up.
            >
            > But I certainly agree about Radek Chlup's book, the place to start
            > now,
            > but to be honest, even before it, I think the best and shorter
            > introduction
            > and where I at least wish I had started is the chapter on Proclus by
            > Giovanni Reale in his History of Ancient Philosophy:
            >
            > _http://books.google.com/books/about/Schools_Imprl_Age_V4.html?id=eX-8XOn3GY
            > UC_
            > (http://books.google.com/books/about/Schools_Imprl_Age_V4.html?id=eX-8XOn3GYUC
            > )
            >
            > It should be easy enough to obtain. He writes so clearly, and it's not
            > very long. (I have not read his book on Proclus, which I believe has
            > not been
            > translated into English: Reale, G., Introduzione a Proclo, Roma-Bari:
            > Laterza.)
            >
            > But even before that, if you haven't read it, definitely the entry
            > in the
            > Stanford online Encyclopedia by Christoph Helmig and Carlos Steel
            >
            > _http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/proclus/_
            > (http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/proclus/)
            >
            > and Carlos Steel's article in the new Cambridge history:
            >
            > Steel, C., 2011, "Proclus," in The Cambridge History of Philosophy
            > in Late
            > Antiquity, L. Gerson (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,
            > vol. 2,
            > pp. 630�653.
            >
            > Good luck!
            >
            > Dennis Clark
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Joshua Robinson
            I would be interested in that photo. On Jan 14, 2013, at 10:48 PM, dgallagher@aol.com wrote: Wondering what others might think about adding G.R.S. Mead,
            Message 5 of 11 , Jan 15, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              I would be interested in that photo.


              On Jan 14, 2013, at 10:48 PM, dgallagher@... wrote:

              Wondering what others might think about adding G.R.S. Mead, Orpheus, to
              the pre-reading recommendation list.

              Text link: _http://archive.org/details/orpheus00meadgoog_
              (http://archive.org/details/orpheus00meadgoog)

              Sorting out the multiplicity of gods in PT is a challenge. The figures in
              Mead might prove helpful, especially in connection with the hierarchies of
              triads.

              Our group created a diagram of the intelligible gods on a large white board
              that helped us get a handle on it all. We started with Mead, then fleshed
              it out through study of PT. Quite an adventure. I have a photo of our
              white board, if interested, and my colleagues are willing to share it.

              David Gallagher
              _Astronoesis_ (http://www.larsonpublications.com/book-details.php?id=50)
              Class Member, _Wisdom's Goldenrod Center for Philosophic Studies_
              (http://wisdomsgoldenrod.org/)





              In a message dated 1/14/2013 2:12:25 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, vaerin
              gjar@... writes:

              --- In _neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com)
              , John Dillon wrote:
              >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Hi there,
              > >
              > > I got in front of me almost the complet works of Proclus and want to
              start
              > > reading soon. So I thought I might first ask the experts to consult me
              on a
              > > reading order. This is my plan for now:
              > >
              > > 1) Theology of Plato
              > > 2) Elements of Theology
              > > 3) Commentary on Parmenides
              > > 4) Commentary on Timaios
              > > 5) Commentary on Euclid
              > > 6) Commentary on Alkibiades
              > >
              > > Thanks for any hints on altering this order,
              > >
              > > Marco Bormann
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              > Or, at the same time, you could always start with a good book on him,
              such
              > as now Radek Chlup�s Proclus. JMD
              >

              If I may also make some suggestions, admittedly in the face of the much
              more expert opinion offered, all of which I agree with personally and as
              someone totally autodidact in his study of Proclus, such as it as been - I
              would not start with the Platonic Theology and then the Elements - though if I
              had to choose between the two, I would say start with the Elements - I have
              studied them quite a bit, over the years, but more almost as a reference
              from other works. But Dodd's notes are so helpful, and not just for Proclus.
              What a masterful work his edition is. Still impresses me, every time I
              pick it up.

              But I certainly agree about Radek Chlup's book, the place to start now,
              but to be honest, even before it, I think the best and shorter introduction
              and where I at least wish I had started is the chapter on Proclus by
              Giovanni Reale in his History of Ancient Philosophy:

              _http://books.google.com/books/about/Schools_Imprl_Age_V4.html?id=eX-8XOn3GY
              UC_
              (http://books.google.com/books/about/Schools_Imprl_Age_V4.html?id=eX-8XOn3GYUC)

              It should be easy enough to obtain. He writes so clearly, and it's not
              very long. (I have not read his book on Proclus, which I believe has not been
              translated into English: Reale, G., Introduzione a Proclo, Roma-Bari:
              Laterza.)

              But even before that, if you haven't read it, definitely the entry in the
              Stanford online Encyclopedia by Christoph Helmig and Carlos Steel

              _http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/proclus/_
              (http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/proclus/)

              and Carlos Steel's article in the new Cambridge history:

              Steel, C., 2011, "Proclus," in The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late
              Antiquity, L. Gerson (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, vol. 2,
              pp. 630�653.

              Good luck!

              Dennis Clark

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Marco Bormann
              Thanks a lot for all your interesting and helpful answers to my question. I am well aware that Proclus will not be an easy task. What I deduct from your
              Message 6 of 11 , Jan 15, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                Thanks a lot for all your interesting and helpful answers to my question.
                I am well aware that Proclus will not be an easy task.
                What I deduct from your comments is that the Theology of Plato seems to be some kind cornerstone after all and that the rest of the texts do not give a guarantee to understand it, which somehow makes me even more inclined to start with it. But I will make use of the texts you recommended me as soon as I get stuck somewhere ... which might come rather quickly.
                But the difficulty actually fits to the situation, I am leaving my home tomorrow for a 4 months job and I have only limited space to take books. So it's really nice to have one book of which I can be sure that it will not be done before the end of my mission.

                I am also very much interested in Davids picture as such maps often help a lot to explore unknown territory.

                Thanks again to all,
                Marco









                >________________________________
                > De : "dgallagher@..." <dgallagher@...>
                >À : neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                >Envoyé le : Lundi 14 janvier 2013 21h48
                >Objet : Re: [neoplatonism] Re: Where to start with Proclus
                >
                >

                >Wondering what others might think about adding G.R.S. Mead, Orpheus, to
                >the pre-reading recommendation list.
                >
                >Text link: _http://archive.org/details/orpheus00meadgoog_
                >(http://archive.org/details/orpheus00meadgoog)
                >
                >Sorting out the multiplicity of gods in PT is a challenge. The figures in
                >Mead might prove helpful, especially in connection with the hierarchies of
                >triads.
                >
                >Our group created a diagram of the intelligible gods on a large white board
                >that helped us get a handle on it all. We started with Mead, then fleshed
                >it out through study of PT. Quite an adventure. I have a photo of our
                >white board, if interested, and my colleagues are willing to share it.
                >
                >David Gallagher
                >_Astronoesis_ (http://www.larsonpublications.com/book-details.php?id=50)
                >Class Member, _Wisdom's Goldenrod Center for Philosophic Studies_
                >(http://wisdomsgoldenrod.org/)
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >In a message dated 1/14/2013 2:12:25 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, vaerin
                >gjar@... writes:
                >
                >--- In _neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com)
                >, John Dillon wrote:
                >>
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >
                >> > Hi there,
                >> >
                >> > I got in front of me almost the complet works of Proclus and want to
                >start
                >> > reading soon. So I thought I might first ask the experts to consult me
                >on a
                >> > reading order. This is my plan for now:
                >> >
                >> > 1) Theology of Plato
                >> > 2) Elements of Theology
                >> > 3) Commentary on Parmenides
                >> > 4) Commentary on Timaios
                >> > 5) Commentary on Euclid
                >> > 6) Commentary on Alkibiades
                >> >
                >> > Thanks for any hints on altering this order,
                >> >
                >> > Marco Bormann
                >> >
                >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >
                >>
                >> Or, at the same time, you could always start with a good book on him,
                >such
                >> as now Radek Chlup¹s Proclus. JMD
                >>
                >
                >If I may also make some suggestions, admittedly in the face of the much
                >more expert opinion offered, all of which I agree with personally and as
                >someone totally autodidact in his study of Proclus, such as it as been - I
                >would not start with the Platonic Theology and then the Elements - though if I
                >had to choose between the two, I would say start with the Elements - I have
                >studied them quite a bit, over the years, but more almost as a reference
                >from other works. But Dodd's notes are so helpful, and not just for Proclus.
                >What a masterful work his edition is. Still impresses me, every time I
                >pick it up.
                >
                >But I certainly agree about Radek Chlup's book, the place to start now,
                >but to be honest, even before it, I think the best and shorter introduction
                >and where I at least wish I had started is the chapter on Proclus by
                >Giovanni Reale in his History of Ancient Philosophy:
                >
                >_http://books.google.com/books/about/Schools_Imprl_Age_V4.html?id=eX-8XOn3GY
                >UC_
                >(http://books.google.com/books/about/Schools_Imprl_Age_V4.html?id=eX-8XOn3GYUC)
                >
                >It should be easy enough to obtain. He writes so clearly, and it's not
                >very long. (I have not read his book on Proclus, which I believe has not been
                >translated into English: Reale, G., Introduzione a Proclo, Roma-Bari:
                >Laterza.)
                >
                >But even before that, if you haven't read it, definitely the entry in the
                >Stanford online Encyclopedia by Christoph Helmig and Carlos Steel
                >
                >_http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/proclus/_
                >(http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/proclus/)
                >
                >and Carlos Steel's article in the new Cambridge history:
                >
                >Steel, C., 2011, "Proclus," in The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late
                >Antiquity, L. Gerson (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, vol. 2,
                >pp. 630–653.
                >
                >Good luck!
                >
                >Dennis Clark
                >
                >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • david.gallagher70
                Will send off-list. In a message dated 1/15/2013 9:39:17 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, robjoshua@gmail.com writes: I would be interested in that photo. On Jan
                Message 7 of 11 , Jan 15, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  Will send off-list.


                  In a message dated 1/15/2013 9:39:17 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
                  robjoshua@... writes:

                  I would be interested in that photo.


                  On Jan 14, 2013, at 10:48 PM, dgallagher@... wrote:

                  Wondering what others might think about adding G.R.S. Mead, Orpheus, to
                  the pre-reading recommendation list.

                  Text link: _http://archive.org/details/orpheus00meadgoog_
                  (http://archive.org/details/orpheus00meadgoog)

                  Sorting out the multiplicity of gods in PT is a challenge. The figures in
                  Mead might prove helpful, especially in connection with the hierarchies of

                  triads.

                  Our group created a diagram of the intelligible gods on a large white
                  board
                  that helped us get a handle on it all. We started with Mead, then fleshed
                  it out through study of PT. Quite an adventure. I have a photo of our
                  white board, if interested, and my colleagues are willing to share it.

                  David Gallagher
                  _Astronoesis_ (http://www.larsonpublications.com/book-details.php?id=50)
                  Class Member, _Wisdom's Goldenrod Center for Philosophic Studies_
                  (http://wisdomsgoldenrod.org/)





                  In a message dated 1/14/2013 2:12:25 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, vaerin
                  gjar@... writes:

                  --- In _neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com_
                  (mailto:neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com)
                  , John Dillon wrote:
                  >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Hi there,
                  > >
                  > > I got in front of me almost the complet works of Proclus and want to
                  start
                  > > reading soon. So I thought I might first ask the experts to consult me
                  on a
                  > > reading order. This is my plan for now:
                  > >
                  > > 1) Theology of Plato
                  > > 2) Elements of Theology
                  > > 3) Commentary on Parmenides
                  > > 4) Commentary on Timaios
                  > > 5) Commentary on Euclid
                  > > 6) Commentary on Alkibiades
                  > >
                  > > Thanks for any hints on altering this order,
                  > >
                  > > Marco Bormann
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  > Or, at the same time, you could always start with a good book on him,
                  such
                  > as now Radek Chlup¹s Proclus. JMD
                  >

                  If I may also make some suggestions, admittedly in the face of the much
                  more expert opinion offered, all of which I agree with personally and as
                  someone totally autodidact in his study of Proclus, such as it as been - I
                  would not start with the Platonic Theology and then the Elements - though
                  if I
                  had to choose between the two, I would say start with the Elements - I
                  have
                  studied them quite a bit, over the years, but more almost as a reference
                  from other works. But Dodd's notes are so helpful, and not just for
                  Proclus.
                  What a masterful work his edition is. Still impresses me, every time I
                  pick it up.

                  But I certainly agree about Radek Chlup's book, the place to start now,
                  but to be honest, even before it, I think the best and shorter
                  introduction
                  and where I at least wish I had started is the chapter on Proclus by
                  Giovanni Reale in his History of Ancient Philosophy:

                  _http://books.google.com/books/about/Schools_Imprl_Age_V4.html?id=eX-8XOn3GY
                  UC_
                  (http://books.google.com/books/about/Schools_Imprl_Age_V4.html?id=eX-8XOn3GY
                  UC)

                  It should be easy enough to obtain. He writes so clearly, and it's not
                  very long. (I have not read his book on Proclus, which I believe has not
                  been
                  translated into English: Reale, G., Introduzione a Proclo, Roma-Bari:
                  Laterza.)

                  But even before that, if you haven't read it, definitely the entry in the
                  Stanford online Encyclopedia by Christoph Helmig and Carlos Steel

                  _http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/proclus/_
                  (http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/proclus/)

                  and Carlos Steel's article in the new Cambridge history:

                  Steel, C., 2011, "Proclus," in The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late
                  Antiquity, L. Gerson (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, vol. 2,
                  pp. 630–653.

                  Good luck!

                  Dennis Clark

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