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Re: [neoplatonism] Procession in Commentary on Parmenides

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  • Marilynn Lawrence
    ... M.C. The fragments of the In Parm don t strike me as particularly mathematical, but then again, all we have are fragments. For the Chaldaean-influenced
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 14, 2005
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      > SO IS 'PROCESSION' NOT THE RIGHT TRANSLATION FOR PARODOS IN THE
      > IN pARM? BECHTLE ALSO USES IT, AND IT DOES NOT SEEM UNNATURAL, BUT IT
      > MAY BE THAT WE SHOULD BE CHOOSING A TERM THAT WILL DIFFERENTIATE IT
      > FROM
      > PROODOS.
      >
      > But which would Porphyry use, one or the other or both?
      > Or does it matter much either way?
      > DOES THE TYPE OF TEXT MAKE A DIFFERENCE? THE MATHEMATICAL FLAVOUR OF
      > THE PARMENIDES INVITES MATHEMATICAL LANGUAGE, AND OF 688 CASES OF
      > PAROD
      > IN 2ND CENTURY 517 ARE PTOLEMY, WHILE OF THE 1063 IN THE FOURTH
      > CENTURY
      > 500 ARE THEON. BUT I'M NOT LOOKING UP ALL THE REFERENCES!

      M.C. The fragments of the In Parm don't strike me as particularly
      mathematical, but then again, all we have are fragments. For the
      Chaldaean-influenced Porphyry the astronomico-astrological meaning of
      the term might also be relevant (LSJ A b : "rotation of
      chronocratory").
      >
      >
      >
      > Best, Mike.
      >

      I think Michael is onto something.

      Parodos is used most typically in astrological texts (e.g. Valens) as a word
      that could be translated in modern astrology as "transit". This occurs when
      a planet at a given time, either falls in the same sign as a planet or place
      in the natal chart or in a sign geometrically related to it (opposite,
      trine, quadrangle, sextile). (This is not to be confused with the modern
      *astronomical* use of the term "transit" to indicate Mercury or Venus
      appearing to pass over the surface of the Sun). Ptolemy seems to use this
      term in his astronomical work to mean more generally the motions of the
      planets (e. g. Syntax. 1, 1.29.11). In his Apotelesmatics, parados covers
      the motions of both planets and fixed stars (including the diurnal motion,
      1.2.4.2, and including latitude as well as longitude).

      Dennis, you originally posed the question, "Is the use of parodos of any
      significance in attributing authorship to the Commentary on Parmenides?"
      To answer this, ask how much, in the mind of Porphyry, are the gods (and
      what proceeds from them) in his commentary on Parm. equal to, like, or
      represented by the planets? In his Quaestionum Homericarum he uses Parados
      in the astronomical sense - the sun's procession (8.1.21). In his
      commentary on Ptolemy's Harmonica, he uses it again in an astrological
      context (24.13). If we accept his Introduction to the Tetrabiblos to be
      genuine (although most of it of course is copied directly from Antiochus,
      with the last chapters added on later), parados is used again to mean
      transits of the planets.

      Marilynn
    • Sebastian Moro
      ... There can be other cosmic implications of parodos also, but this time in relation to the elements. Olympiodorus commenting on Phaedo 62(I m going to
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 15, 2005
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        --- Marilynn Lawrence <pronoia@...> wrote:
        > Parodos is used most typically in astrological texts
        > (e.g. Valens) as a word
        > that could be translated in modern astrology as
        > "transit". This occurs when
        > a planet at a given time, either falls in the same
        > sign as a planet or place
        > in the natal chart or in a sign geometrically
        > related to it (opposite,
        > trine, quadrangle, sextile).

        There can be other cosmic implications of "parodos"
        also, but this time in relation to the elements.
        Olympiodorus commenting on Phaedo 62(I'm going to
        check the reference later, I'm sorry), identifies
        "prohodos" with the goddess Hera (who in other sources
        is related to "Air"), and on the other hand
        "epistrophe", with Zeus, because of his
        ray and fire help the ascent and return.
        The horizontal dimension of the expansion of air is
        related to parodos, and the vertical dimension of
        epistrophe is symbolised with fire.
        Sebastian Moro





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