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Re: [neoplatonism] arabic texts

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  • Thomas Mether
    I think you have me mixed up with someone else. I AM NOT clergy and on no such schedule. On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 8:25 PM, Dionysius Diadokhos
    Message 1 of 9 , May 8, 2012
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      I think you have me mixed up with someone else. I AM NOT clergy and on no
      such schedule.

      On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 8:25 PM, Dionysius Diadokhos <
      dionysiusdiadokhos@...> wrote:

      > Father,
      >
      > I see you scheduled for University of Thessaloniki for the OTS. If you
      > have been on Paros, are you part of the canonization fact-finding team? If
      > so, please contact me off list.
      >
      > Dion
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 7:30 PM, Thomas Mether <thomas.r.mether@...>wrote:
      >
      >> **
      >>
      >>
      >> I offer a warning though. A good amount of this retrieval research is
      >> currently caught up in the politics of Syria. As of the beginning of this
      >> year (2012), the Syrian Orthodox Christians were in solid support of the
      >> Assad regime, including the American members of the Archdiocese, which has
      >> complicated the logistics to get access to the basic results of projects
      >> to
      >> recover uncatalogued texts. There are things going on in Paros but I was
      >> also stuck there because of events in Syria.
      >>
      >> On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 5:22 PM, Thomas Mether <thomas.r.mether@...
      >> >wrote:
      >>
      >>
      >> > If it is Neoplatonic texts in Syriac and/or Arabic, a person you may
      >> want
      >> > to contact is Professor George Saliba (Columbia University). He has been
      >> > working in Syriac and Arabic Neoplatonic texts for quite some time
      >> > including retrieving previously uncatalogued manuscripts from
      >> > middle-eastern Christian monasteries. His access is partly due to his
      >> > brother being the Metropolitan of North America under the Patriarch of
      >> > Antioch of the Syrian Orthodox Church. He is the one responsible, for
      >> > example, for showing and publishing that the Syrian Neoplatonist
      >> Christians
      >> > were using a base-ten numeral system incorporating zero as early as the
      >> > time of Bar Dasan of Edessa (second century) because of their
      >> interaction
      >> > with the Indians long before the estimates of previous accounts in the
      >> > history of mathematics.
      >> >
      >> > Thomas Mether
      >> >
      >> >
      >> > On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 4:55 PM, Adamson, Peter <peter.adamson@...
      >> >wrote:
      >> >
      >> >> Dear all,
      >> >>
      >> >> Yes, Mike beat me to it but I'd agree with what he says here. For
      >> >> vocabulary searches we are still pretty much working from glossaries in
      >> >> individual books though there are currently some efforts to bring these
      >> >> together, especially in the ambitious GALex project, and see now:
      >> >>
      >> >> http://www.greekintoarabic.eu/index.php?id=4
      >> >>
      >> >> See also Dag Hasse's Arabic/Latin glossary:
      >> >>
      >> >> http://www.philosophie.uni-wuerzburg.de/arabic-latin-glossary/
      >> >>
      >> >> These are brilliant but they are nothing like the TLG in that they
      >> don't
      >> >> make whole texts electronically available.
      >> >>
      >> >> As far as editions and manuscripts go it actually depends a lot on the
      >> >> period we're talking about. Pretty much all the significant
      >> Graeco-Arabic
      >> >> versions of Aristotle and other Greek thinkers have at least been
      >> edited,
      >> >> and for authors like, say, Kindi, Farabi, Avicenna, or Averroes there
      >> are
      >> >> usually editions and not only manuscripts. The standard of editing is
      >> >> uneven. It's rare to find an Arabic edition with a proper critical
      >> >> apparatus, for instance, such as you'd expect to see at the bottom of
      >> the
      >> >> page in a Greek or Latin critical edition. For the later period (like,
      >> the
      >> >> 12th or 13th century onward) things start to get more difficult and
      >> people
      >> >> who work in that period usually work directly with manuscripts on a
      >> regular
      >> >> basis. I'm glad to say I mostly restrict my attention to the earlier
      >> >> period! And even for the earlier period if you are working in areas
      >> like
      >> >> kalam instead of falsafa you will be stuck with manuscripts quite
      >> >> frequently.
      >> >>
      >> >> Incidentally the next question after editions would of course be
      >> >> translations... at which point I could perhaps mention that a volume of
      >> >> translations of all of al-Kindi's philosophical works, co-authored by
      >> >> myself and Peter E. Pormann, will be available from Oxford UP very
      >> soon.
      >> >> I'll post here when it is out.
      >> >>
      >> >> Best wishes,
      >> >> Peter
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >> peter.adamson@...
      >> >>
      >> >> Philosophy Dept.
      >> >> King's College London
      >> >> Strand
      >> >> London WC2R 2LS
      >> >>
      >> >> The History of Philosophy Podcast
      >> >> http://www.historyofphilosophy.net
      >> >> On Twitter @HistPhilosophy
      >> >> ________________________________________
      >> >> From: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com [neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com] On
      >> >> Behalf Of Goya [goya@...]
      >> >> Sent: Monday, May 07, 2012 9:58 PM
      >> >> To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
      >> >> Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] arabic texts
      >> >>
      >> >> > Hello everyone,
      >> >> >
      >> >> > I do have a very technical question. For greek I mostly use the TLG
      >> >> > database. I wonder I anything like that exists for arabic texts.
      >> >>
      >> >> M.C. No. The closest thing would be a site like al-waraq.
      >> >>
      >> >> And if
      >> >> > not, how do people using arabic sources work; are there any standard
      >> >> > editions or is most of the philosophical stuff still in manuscript
      >> form.
      >> >>
      >> >> M.C. A bot of both. There are pretty well standard editions of most
      >> works
      >> >> by the better known authors, but much material remains in manuscript
      >> form.
      >> >> There is a CNRS project to catalogue as much of this material as
      >> possible.
      >> >>
      >> >> In any given case, you may find Arabic editions (often of uncertain
      >> date
      >> >> and value) by doing a google search for the title in Arabic.
      >> >>
      >> >> NTH, Mike
      >> >>
      >> >> >
      >> >> > Thanks a lot,
      >> >> > Marco Bormann
      >> >> >
      >> >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >> >> >
      >> >> >
      >> >>
      >> >> Michael Chase
      >> >> CNRS UPR 76
      >> >> Paris-Villejuif
      >> >> France
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >> ------------------------------------
      >> >>
      >> >> Yahoo! Groups Links
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >
      >>
      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
      >


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