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arabic texts

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  • Marco Bormann
    Hello everyone,   I do have a very technical question. For greek I mostly use the TLG database. I wonder I anything like that exists for arabic texts. And if
    Message 1 of 9 , May 7, 2012
      Hello everyone,
       
      I do have a very technical question. For greek I mostly use the TLG database. I wonder I anything like that exists for arabic texts. And if not, how do people using arabic sources work; are there any standard editions or is most of the philosophical stuff still in manuscript form.
       
      Thanks a lot,
      Marco Bormann

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Goya
      ... M.C. No. The closest thing would be a site like al-waraq. And if ... M.C. A bot of both. There are pretty well standard editions of most works by the
      Message 2 of 9 , May 7, 2012
        > Hello everyone,
        >  
        > I do have a very technical question. For greek I mostly use the TLG
        > database. I wonder I anything like that exists for arabic texts.

        M.C. No. The closest thing would be a site like al-waraq.

        And if
        > not, how do people using arabic sources work; are there any standard
        > editions or is most of the philosophical stuff still in manuscript form.

        M.C. A bot of both. There are pretty well standard editions of most works
        by the better known authors, but much material remains in manuscript form.
        There is a CNRS project to catalogue as much of this material as possible.

        In any given case, you may find Arabic editions (often of uncertain date
        and value) by doing a google search for the title in Arabic.

        NTH, Mike


        >  
        > Thanks a lot,
        > Marco Bormann
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >


        Michael Chase
        CNRS UPR 76
        Paris-Villejuif
        France
      • Dionysius Diadokhos
        Yassou, Brigham Young University Press is doing a series of critical edition texts with interlinear Arabic and English translations. They are very nicely done
        Message 3 of 9 , May 7, 2012
          Yassou,

          Brigham Young University Press is doing a series of critical edition texts
          with interlinear Arabic and English translations. They are very nicely done
          too. They do not have all critical apparatus, though. The project is just
          underway so much needs to be done. Their focus is not specifically Neo
          Platonic texts.

          Dion

          On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 2:07 PM, Marco Bormann <marcobormann@...> wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > Hello everyone,
          >
          > I do have a very technical question. For greek I mostly use the TLG
          > database. I wonder I anything like that exists for arabic texts. And if
          > not, how do people using arabic sources work; are there any standard
          > editions or is most of the philosophical stuff still in manuscript form.
          >
          > Thanks a lot,
          > Marco Bormann
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Adamson, Peter
          Dear all, Yes, Mike beat me to it but I d agree with what he says here. For vocabulary searches we are still pretty much working from glossaries in individual
          Message 4 of 9 , May 7, 2012
            Dear all,

            Yes, Mike beat me to it but I'd agree with what he says here. For vocabulary searches we are still pretty much working from glossaries in individual books though there are currently some efforts to bring these together, especially in the ambitious GALex project, and see now:

            http://www.greekintoarabic.eu/index.php?id=4

            See also Dag Hasse's Arabic/Latin glossary:

            http://www.philosophie.uni-wuerzburg.de/arabic-latin-glossary/

            These are brilliant but they are nothing like the TLG in that they don't make whole texts electronically available.

            As far as editions and manuscripts go it actually depends a lot on the period we're talking about. Pretty much all the significant Graeco-Arabic versions of Aristotle and other Greek thinkers have at least been edited, and for authors like, say, Kindi, Farabi, Avicenna, or Averroes there are usually editions and not only manuscripts. The standard of editing is uneven. It's rare to find an Arabic edition with a proper critical apparatus, for instance, such as you'd expect to see at the bottom of the page in a Greek or Latin critical edition. For the later period (like, the 12th or 13th century onward) things start to get more difficult and people who work in that period usually work directly with manuscripts on a regular basis. I'm glad to say I mostly restrict my attention to the earlier period! And even for the earlier period if you are working in areas like kalam instead of falsafa you will be stuck with manuscripts quite frequently.

            Incidentally the next question after editions would of course be translations... at which point I could perhaps mention that a volume of translations of all of al-Kindi's philosophical works, co-authored by myself and Peter E. Pormann, will be available from Oxford UP very soon. I'll post here when it is out.

            Best wishes,
            Peter



            peter.adamson@...

            Philosophy Dept.
            King's College London
            Strand
            London WC2R 2LS

            The History of Philosophy Podcast
            http://www.historyofphilosophy.net
            On Twitter @HistPhilosophy
            ________________________________________
            From: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com [neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Goya [goya@...]
            Sent: Monday, May 07, 2012 9:58 PM
            To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] arabic texts

            > Hello everyone,
            >
            > I do have a very technical question. For greek I mostly use the TLG
            > database. I wonder I anything like that exists for arabic texts.

            M.C. No. The closest thing would be a site like al-waraq.

            And if
            > not, how do people using arabic sources work; are there any standard
            > editions or is most of the philosophical stuff still in manuscript form.

            M.C. A bot of both. There are pretty well standard editions of most works
            by the better known authors, but much material remains in manuscript form.
            There is a CNRS project to catalogue as much of this material as possible.

            In any given case, you may find Arabic editions (often of uncertain date
            and value) by doing a google search for the title in Arabic.

            NTH, Mike

            >
            > Thanks a lot,
            > Marco Bormann
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >

            Michael Chase
            CNRS UPR 76
            Paris-Villejuif
            France
          • Thomas Mether
            If it is Neoplatonic texts in Syriac and/or Arabic, a person you may want to contact is Professor George Saliba (Columbia University). He has been working in
            Message 5 of 9 , May 7, 2012
              If it is Neoplatonic texts in Syriac and/or Arabic, a person you may want
              to contact is Professor George Saliba (Columbia University). He has been
              working in Syriac and Arabic Neoplatonic texts for quite some time
              including retrieving previously uncatalogued manuscripts from
              middle-eastern Christian monasteries. His access is partly due to his
              brother being the Metropolitan of North America under the Patriarch of
              Antioch of the Syrian Orthodox Church. He is the one responsible, for
              example, for showing and publishing that the Syrian Neoplatonist Christians
              were using a base-ten numeral system incorporating zero as early as the
              time of Bar Dasan of Edessa (second century) because of their interaction
              with the Indians long before the estimates of previous accounts in the
              history of mathematics.

              Thomas Mether

              On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 4:55 PM, Adamson, Peter <peter.adamson@...>wrote:

              > Dear all,
              >
              > Yes, Mike beat me to it but I'd agree with what he says here. For
              > vocabulary searches we are still pretty much working from glossaries in
              > individual books though there are currently some efforts to bring these
              > together, especially in the ambitious GALex project, and see now:
              >
              > http://www.greekintoarabic.eu/index.php?id=4
              >
              > See also Dag Hasse's Arabic/Latin glossary:
              >
              > http://www.philosophie.uni-wuerzburg.de/arabic-latin-glossary/
              >
              > These are brilliant but they are nothing like the TLG in that they don't
              > make whole texts electronically available.
              >
              > As far as editions and manuscripts go it actually depends a lot on the
              > period we're talking about. Pretty much all the significant Graeco-Arabic
              > versions of Aristotle and other Greek thinkers have at least been edited,
              > and for authors like, say, Kindi, Farabi, Avicenna, or Averroes there are
              > usually editions and not only manuscripts. The standard of editing is
              > uneven. It's rare to find an Arabic edition with a proper critical
              > apparatus, for instance, such as you'd expect to see at the bottom of the
              > page in a Greek or Latin critical edition. For the later period (like, the
              > 12th or 13th century onward) things start to get more difficult and people
              > who work in that period usually work directly with manuscripts on a regular
              > basis. I'm glad to say I mostly restrict my attention to the earlier
              > period! And even for the earlier period if you are working in areas like
              > kalam instead of falsafa you will be stuck with manuscripts quite
              > frequently.
              >
              > Incidentally the next question after editions would of course be
              > translations... at which point I could perhaps mention that a volume of
              > translations of all of al-Kindi's philosophical works, co-authored by
              > myself and Peter E. Pormann, will be available from Oxford UP very soon.
              > I'll post here when it is out.
              >
              > Best wishes,
              > Peter
              >
              >
              >
              > peter.adamson@...
              >
              > Philosophy Dept.
              > King's College London
              > Strand
              > London WC2R 2LS
              >
              > The History of Philosophy Podcast
              > http://www.historyofphilosophy.net
              > On Twitter @HistPhilosophy
              > ________________________________________
              > From: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com [neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com] On
              > Behalf Of Goya [goya@...]
              > Sent: Monday, May 07, 2012 9:58 PM
              > To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] arabic texts
              >
              > > Hello everyone,
              > >
              > > I do have a very technical question. For greek I mostly use the TLG
              > > database. I wonder I anything like that exists for arabic texts.
              >
              > M.C. No. The closest thing would be a site like al-waraq.
              >
              > And if
              > > not, how do people using arabic sources work; are there any standard
              > > editions or is most of the philosophical stuff still in manuscript form.
              >
              > M.C. A bot of both. There are pretty well standard editions of most works
              > by the better known authors, but much material remains in manuscript form.
              > There is a CNRS project to catalogue as much of this material as possible.
              >
              > In any given case, you may find Arabic editions (often of uncertain date
              > and value) by doing a google search for the title in Arabic.
              >
              > NTH, Mike
              >
              > >
              > > Thanks a lot,
              > > Marco Bormann
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > >
              >
              > Michael Chase
              > CNRS UPR 76
              > Paris-Villejuif
              > France
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Thomas Mether
              I offer a warning though. A good amount of this retrieval research is currently caught up in the politics of Syria. As of the beginning of this year (2012),
              Message 6 of 9 , May 7, 2012
                I offer a warning though. A good amount of this retrieval research is
                currently caught up in the politics of Syria. As of the beginning of this
                year (2012), the Syrian Orthodox Christians were in solid support of the
                Assad regime, including the American members of the Archdiocese, which has
                complicated the logistics to get access to the basic results of projects to
                recover uncatalogued texts. There are things going on in Paros but I was
                also stuck there because of events in Syria.

                On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 5:22 PM, Thomas Mether <thomas.r.mether@...>wrote:

                > If it is Neoplatonic texts in Syriac and/or Arabic, a person you may want
                > to contact is Professor George Saliba (Columbia University). He has been
                > working in Syriac and Arabic Neoplatonic texts for quite some time
                > including retrieving previously uncatalogued manuscripts from
                > middle-eastern Christian monasteries. His access is partly due to his
                > brother being the Metropolitan of North America under the Patriarch of
                > Antioch of the Syrian Orthodox Church. He is the one responsible, for
                > example, for showing and publishing that the Syrian Neoplatonist Christians
                > were using a base-ten numeral system incorporating zero as early as the
                > time of Bar Dasan of Edessa (second century) because of their interaction
                > with the Indians long before the estimates of previous accounts in the
                > history of mathematics.
                >
                > Thomas Mether
                >
                >
                > On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 4:55 PM, Adamson, Peter <peter.adamson@...>wrote:
                >
                >> Dear all,
                >>
                >> Yes, Mike beat me to it but I'd agree with what he says here. For
                >> vocabulary searches we are still pretty much working from glossaries in
                >> individual books though there are currently some efforts to bring these
                >> together, especially in the ambitious GALex project, and see now:
                >>
                >> http://www.greekintoarabic.eu/index.php?id=4
                >>
                >> See also Dag Hasse's Arabic/Latin glossary:
                >>
                >> http://www.philosophie.uni-wuerzburg.de/arabic-latin-glossary/
                >>
                >> These are brilliant but they are nothing like the TLG in that they don't
                >> make whole texts electronically available.
                >>
                >> As far as editions and manuscripts go it actually depends a lot on the
                >> period we're talking about. Pretty much all the significant Graeco-Arabic
                >> versions of Aristotle and other Greek thinkers have at least been edited,
                >> and for authors like, say, Kindi, Farabi, Avicenna, or Averroes there are
                >> usually editions and not only manuscripts. The standard of editing is
                >> uneven. It's rare to find an Arabic edition with a proper critical
                >> apparatus, for instance, such as you'd expect to see at the bottom of the
                >> page in a Greek or Latin critical edition. For the later period (like, the
                >> 12th or 13th century onward) things start to get more difficult and people
                >> who work in that period usually work directly with manuscripts on a regular
                >> basis. I'm glad to say I mostly restrict my attention to the earlier
                >> period! And even for the earlier period if you are working in areas like
                >> kalam instead of falsafa you will be stuck with manuscripts quite
                >> frequently.
                >>
                >> Incidentally the next question after editions would of course be
                >> translations... at which point I could perhaps mention that a volume of
                >> translations of all of al-Kindi's philosophical works, co-authored by
                >> myself and Peter E. Pormann, will be available from Oxford UP very soon.
                >> I'll post here when it is out.
                >>
                >> Best wishes,
                >> Peter
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> peter.adamson@...
                >>
                >> Philosophy Dept.
                >> King's College London
                >> Strand
                >> London WC2R 2LS
                >>
                >> The History of Philosophy Podcast
                >> http://www.historyofphilosophy.net
                >> On Twitter @HistPhilosophy
                >> ________________________________________
                >> From: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com [neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com] On
                >> Behalf Of Goya [goya@...]
                >> Sent: Monday, May 07, 2012 9:58 PM
                >> To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                >> Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] arabic texts
                >>
                >> > Hello everyone,
                >> >
                >> > I do have a very technical question. For greek I mostly use the TLG
                >> > database. I wonder I anything like that exists for arabic texts.
                >>
                >> M.C. No. The closest thing would be a site like al-waraq.
                >>
                >> And if
                >> > not, how do people using arabic sources work; are there any standard
                >> > editions or is most of the philosophical stuff still in manuscript form.
                >>
                >> M.C. A bot of both. There are pretty well standard editions of most works
                >> by the better known authors, but much material remains in manuscript form.
                >> There is a CNRS project to catalogue as much of this material as possible.
                >>
                >> In any given case, you may find Arabic editions (often of uncertain date
                >> and value) by doing a google search for the title in Arabic.
                >>
                >> NTH, Mike
                >>
                >> >
                >> > Thanks a lot,
                >> > Marco Bormann
                >> >
                >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >> >
                >> >
                >>
                >> Michael Chase
                >> CNRS UPR 76
                >> Paris-Villejuif
                >> France
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> ------------------------------------
                >>
                >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Dionysius Diadokhos
                Father, I see you scheduled for University of Thessaloniki for the OTS. If you have been on Paros, are you part of the canonization fact-finding team? If so,
                Message 7 of 9 , May 7, 2012
                  Father,

                  I see you scheduled for University of Thessaloniki for the OTS. If you have
                  been on Paros, are you part of the canonization fact-finding team? If so,
                  please contact me off list.

                  Dion





                  On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 7:30 PM, Thomas Mether <thomas.r.mether@...>wrote:

                  > **
                  >
                  >
                  > I offer a warning though. A good amount of this retrieval research is
                  > currently caught up in the politics of Syria. As of the beginning of this
                  > year (2012), the Syrian Orthodox Christians were in solid support of the
                  > Assad regime, including the American members of the Archdiocese, which has
                  > complicated the logistics to get access to the basic results of projects to
                  > recover uncatalogued texts. There are things going on in Paros but I was
                  > also stuck there because of events in Syria.
                  >
                  > On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 5:22 PM, Thomas Mether <thomas.r.mether@...
                  > >wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > > If it is Neoplatonic texts in Syriac and/or Arabic, a person you may want
                  > > to contact is Professor George Saliba (Columbia University). He has been
                  > > working in Syriac and Arabic Neoplatonic texts for quite some time
                  > > including retrieving previously uncatalogued manuscripts from
                  > > middle-eastern Christian monasteries. His access is partly due to his
                  > > brother being the Metropolitan of North America under the Patriarch of
                  > > Antioch of the Syrian Orthodox Church. He is the one responsible, for
                  > > example, for showing and publishing that the Syrian Neoplatonist
                  > Christians
                  > > were using a base-ten numeral system incorporating zero as early as the
                  > > time of Bar Dasan of Edessa (second century) because of their interaction
                  > > with the Indians long before the estimates of previous accounts in the
                  > > history of mathematics.
                  > >
                  > > Thomas Mether
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 4:55 PM, Adamson, Peter <peter.adamson@...
                  > >wrote:
                  > >
                  > >> Dear all,
                  > >>
                  > >> Yes, Mike beat me to it but I'd agree with what he says here. For
                  > >> vocabulary searches we are still pretty much working from glossaries in
                  > >> individual books though there are currently some efforts to bring these
                  > >> together, especially in the ambitious GALex project, and see now:
                  > >>
                  > >> http://www.greekintoarabic.eu/index.php?id=4
                  > >>
                  > >> See also Dag Hasse's Arabic/Latin glossary:
                  > >>
                  > >> http://www.philosophie.uni-wuerzburg.de/arabic-latin-glossary/
                  > >>
                  > >> These are brilliant but they are nothing like the TLG in that they don't
                  > >> make whole texts electronically available.
                  > >>
                  > >> As far as editions and manuscripts go it actually depends a lot on the
                  > >> period we're talking about. Pretty much all the significant
                  > Graeco-Arabic
                  > >> versions of Aristotle and other Greek thinkers have at least been
                  > edited,
                  > >> and for authors like, say, Kindi, Farabi, Avicenna, or Averroes there
                  > are
                  > >> usually editions and not only manuscripts. The standard of editing is
                  > >> uneven. It's rare to find an Arabic edition with a proper critical
                  > >> apparatus, for instance, such as you'd expect to see at the bottom of
                  > the
                  > >> page in a Greek or Latin critical edition. For the later period (like,
                  > the
                  > >> 12th or 13th century onward) things start to get more difficult and
                  > people
                  > >> who work in that period usually work directly with manuscripts on a
                  > regular
                  > >> basis. I'm glad to say I mostly restrict my attention to the earlier
                  > >> period! And even for the earlier period if you are working in areas like
                  > >> kalam instead of falsafa you will be stuck with manuscripts quite
                  > >> frequently.
                  > >>
                  > >> Incidentally the next question after editions would of course be
                  > >> translations... at which point I could perhaps mention that a volume of
                  > >> translations of all of al-Kindi's philosophical works, co-authored by
                  > >> myself and Peter E. Pormann, will be available from Oxford UP very soon.
                  > >> I'll post here when it is out.
                  > >>
                  > >> Best wishes,
                  > >> Peter
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >> peter.adamson@...
                  > >>
                  > >> Philosophy Dept.
                  > >> King's College London
                  > >> Strand
                  > >> London WC2R 2LS
                  > >>
                  > >> The History of Philosophy Podcast
                  > >> http://www.historyofphilosophy.net
                  > >> On Twitter @HistPhilosophy
                  > >> ________________________________________
                  > >> From: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com [neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com] On
                  > >> Behalf Of Goya [goya@...]
                  > >> Sent: Monday, May 07, 2012 9:58 PM
                  > >> To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                  > >> Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] arabic texts
                  > >>
                  > >> > Hello everyone,
                  > >> >
                  > >> > I do have a very technical question. For greek I mostly use the TLG
                  > >> > database. I wonder I anything like that exists for arabic texts.
                  > >>
                  > >> M.C. No. The closest thing would be a site like al-waraq.
                  > >>
                  > >> And if
                  > >> > not, how do people using arabic sources work; are there any standard
                  > >> > editions or is most of the philosophical stuff still in manuscript
                  > form.
                  > >>
                  > >> M.C. A bot of both. There are pretty well standard editions of most
                  > works
                  > >> by the better known authors, but much material remains in manuscript
                  > form.
                  > >> There is a CNRS project to catalogue as much of this material as
                  > possible.
                  > >>
                  > >> In any given case, you may find Arabic editions (often of uncertain date
                  > >> and value) by doing a google search for the title in Arabic.
                  > >>
                  > >> NTH, Mike
                  > >>
                  > >> >
                  > >> > Thanks a lot,
                  > >> > Marco Bormann
                  > >> >
                  > >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >> >
                  > >> >
                  > >>
                  > >> Michael Chase
                  > >> CNRS UPR 76
                  > >> Paris-Villejuif
                  > >> France
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >> ------------------------------------
                  > >>
                  > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Marco Bormann
                  Thanks a lot for all your valuable hints.   Marco ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 8, 2012
                    Thanks a lot for all your valuable hints.
                     
                    Marco


                    >________________________________
                    > De : Goya <goya@...>
                    >À : neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                    >Envoyé le : Lundi 7 mai 2012 22h58
                    >Objet : Re: [neoplatonism] arabic texts
                    >
                    >
                    >

                    >
                    >
                    >> Hello everyone,
                    >>  
                    >> I do have a very technical question. For greek I mostly use the TLG
                    >> database. I wonder I anything like that exists for arabic texts.
                    >
                    >M.C. No. The closest thing would be a site like al-waraq.
                    >
                    >And if
                    >> not, how do people using arabic sources work; are there any standard
                    >> editions or is most of the philosophical stuff still in manuscript form.
                    >
                    >M.C. A bot of both. There are pretty well standard editions of most works
                    >by the better known authors, but much material remains in manuscript form.
                    >There is a CNRS project to catalogue as much of this material as possible.
                    >
                    >In any given case, you may find Arabic editions (often of uncertain date
                    >and value) by doing a google search for the title in Arabic.
                    >
                    >NTH, Mike
                    >
                    >>  
                    >> Thanks a lot,
                    >> Marco Bormann
                    >>
                    >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >>
                    >>
                    >
                    >Michael Chase
                    >CNRS UPR 76
                    >Paris-Villejuif
                    >France
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Thomas Mether
                    I think you have me mixed up with someone else. I AM NOT clergy and on no such schedule. On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 8:25 PM, Dionysius Diadokhos
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 8, 2012
                      I think you have me mixed up with someone else. I AM NOT clergy and on no
                      such schedule.

                      On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 8:25 PM, Dionysius Diadokhos <
                      dionysiusdiadokhos@...> wrote:

                      > Father,
                      >
                      > I see you scheduled for University of Thessaloniki for the OTS. If you
                      > have been on Paros, are you part of the canonization fact-finding team? If
                      > so, please contact me off list.
                      >
                      > Dion
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 7:30 PM, Thomas Mether <thomas.r.mether@...>wrote:
                      >
                      >> **
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> I offer a warning though. A good amount of this retrieval research is
                      >> currently caught up in the politics of Syria. As of the beginning of this
                      >> year (2012), the Syrian Orthodox Christians were in solid support of the
                      >> Assad regime, including the American members of the Archdiocese, which has
                      >> complicated the logistics to get access to the basic results of projects
                      >> to
                      >> recover uncatalogued texts. There are things going on in Paros but I was
                      >> also stuck there because of events in Syria.
                      >>
                      >> On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 5:22 PM, Thomas Mether <thomas.r.mether@...
                      >> >wrote:
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> > If it is Neoplatonic texts in Syriac and/or Arabic, a person you may
                      >> want
                      >> > to contact is Professor George Saliba (Columbia University). He has been
                      >> > working in Syriac and Arabic Neoplatonic texts for quite some time
                      >> > including retrieving previously uncatalogued manuscripts from
                      >> > middle-eastern Christian monasteries. His access is partly due to his
                      >> > brother being the Metropolitan of North America under the Patriarch of
                      >> > Antioch of the Syrian Orthodox Church. He is the one responsible, for
                      >> > example, for showing and publishing that the Syrian Neoplatonist
                      >> Christians
                      >> > were using a base-ten numeral system incorporating zero as early as the
                      >> > time of Bar Dasan of Edessa (second century) because of their
                      >> interaction
                      >> > with the Indians long before the estimates of previous accounts in the
                      >> > history of mathematics.
                      >> >
                      >> > Thomas Mether
                      >> >
                      >> >
                      >> > On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 4:55 PM, Adamson, Peter <peter.adamson@...
                      >> >wrote:
                      >> >
                      >> >> Dear all,
                      >> >>
                      >> >> Yes, Mike beat me to it but I'd agree with what he says here. For
                      >> >> vocabulary searches we are still pretty much working from glossaries in
                      >> >> individual books though there are currently some efforts to bring these
                      >> >> together, especially in the ambitious GALex project, and see now:
                      >> >>
                      >> >> http://www.greekintoarabic.eu/index.php?id=4
                      >> >>
                      >> >> See also Dag Hasse's Arabic/Latin glossary:
                      >> >>
                      >> >> http://www.philosophie.uni-wuerzburg.de/arabic-latin-glossary/
                      >> >>
                      >> >> These are brilliant but they are nothing like the TLG in that they
                      >> don't
                      >> >> make whole texts electronically available.
                      >> >>
                      >> >> As far as editions and manuscripts go it actually depends a lot on the
                      >> >> period we're talking about. Pretty much all the significant
                      >> Graeco-Arabic
                      >> >> versions of Aristotle and other Greek thinkers have at least been
                      >> edited,
                      >> >> and for authors like, say, Kindi, Farabi, Avicenna, or Averroes there
                      >> are
                      >> >> usually editions and not only manuscripts. The standard of editing is
                      >> >> uneven. It's rare to find an Arabic edition with a proper critical
                      >> >> apparatus, for instance, such as you'd expect to see at the bottom of
                      >> the
                      >> >> page in a Greek or Latin critical edition. For the later period (like,
                      >> the
                      >> >> 12th or 13th century onward) things start to get more difficult and
                      >> people
                      >> >> who work in that period usually work directly with manuscripts on a
                      >> regular
                      >> >> basis. I'm glad to say I mostly restrict my attention to the earlier
                      >> >> period! And even for the earlier period if you are working in areas
                      >> like
                      >> >> kalam instead of falsafa you will be stuck with manuscripts quite
                      >> >> frequently.
                      >> >>
                      >> >> Incidentally the next question after editions would of course be
                      >> >> translations... at which point I could perhaps mention that a volume of
                      >> >> translations of all of al-Kindi's philosophical works, co-authored by
                      >> >> myself and Peter E. Pormann, will be available from Oxford UP very
                      >> soon.
                      >> >> I'll post here when it is out.
                      >> >>
                      >> >> Best wishes,
                      >> >> Peter
                      >> >>
                      >> >>
                      >> >>
                      >> >> peter.adamson@...
                      >> >>
                      >> >> Philosophy Dept.
                      >> >> King's College London
                      >> >> Strand
                      >> >> London WC2R 2LS
                      >> >>
                      >> >> The History of Philosophy Podcast
                      >> >> http://www.historyofphilosophy.net
                      >> >> On Twitter @HistPhilosophy
                      >> >> ________________________________________
                      >> >> From: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com [neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com] On
                      >> >> Behalf Of Goya [goya@...]
                      >> >> Sent: Monday, May 07, 2012 9:58 PM
                      >> >> To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                      >> >> Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] arabic texts
                      >> >>
                      >> >> > Hello everyone,
                      >> >> >
                      >> >> > I do have a very technical question. For greek I mostly use the TLG
                      >> >> > database. I wonder I anything like that exists for arabic texts.
                      >> >>
                      >> >> M.C. No. The closest thing would be a site like al-waraq.
                      >> >>
                      >> >> And if
                      >> >> > not, how do people using arabic sources work; are there any standard
                      >> >> > editions or is most of the philosophical stuff still in manuscript
                      >> form.
                      >> >>
                      >> >> M.C. A bot of both. There are pretty well standard editions of most
                      >> works
                      >> >> by the better known authors, but much material remains in manuscript
                      >> form.
                      >> >> There is a CNRS project to catalogue as much of this material as
                      >> possible.
                      >> >>
                      >> >> In any given case, you may find Arabic editions (often of uncertain
                      >> date
                      >> >> and value) by doing a google search for the title in Arabic.
                      >> >>
                      >> >> NTH, Mike
                      >> >>
                      >> >> >
                      >> >> > Thanks a lot,
                      >> >> > Marco Bormann
                      >> >> >
                      >> >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >> >> >
                      >> >> >
                      >> >>
                      >> >> Michael Chase
                      >> >> CNRS UPR 76
                      >> >> Paris-Villejuif
                      >> >> France
                      >> >>
                      >> >>
                      >> >>
                      >> >>
                      >> >>
                      >> >> ------------------------------------
                      >> >>
                      >> >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >> >>
                      >> >>
                      >> >>
                      >> >>
                      >> >
                      >>
                      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >
                      >


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