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Possible Five Worlds of the Timaeus?

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  • Russ Kinter
    Hello All, While reading parts of F. M. Cornford s Plato s Cosmology for references on the dodecahedron I came ran across Cornford s commentary on Timaeus 55
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 19 8:01 PM
      Hello All,
      While reading parts of F. M. Cornford's "Plato's Cosmology" for references
      on the dodecahedron I came ran across Cornford's commentary on Timaeus 55
      C-D, where Plato alludes to the possibility of five worlds rather than just
      one. The commentary indicated that Plato's allusion was obscure with no real
      solution or one that depended on Plato recognizing the aether as an element
      for which there isn't any evidence as such in his dialogues.
      Cornford's puzzled statements have me a little bewildered because it seems
      to me there is a very simple and elegant answer -maybe a little too simple
      and pat which is why I am posting here. Has anyone ever considered that the
      five worlds are found in the five equal interconnected cubes that can
      implicitly share vertexes with a dodecahedron? I put together a hasty web
      page with screen shots of models (expressing three dimensional ideas in text
      is inefficient at best) to demonstrate my point:

      http://www.deepmatrix.org/five_cubes_with_dodecahedron/

      It is a little hard for me to believe Cornford and previous authorities
      ignored or were unaware of this solution, so what is wrong with it?

      Thanks!
      Russ Kinter

      "All the fires of Cain's motivation cannot burn a love that's sound." -
      Stacy Sutherland



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John Uebersax
      Thought I d pass along that there s now an entry for Ficino in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.  It s a few months old, but I don t think it s been
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 21 11:23 AM
        Thought I'd pass along that there's now an entry for Ficino in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.  It's a few months old, but I don't think it's been mentioned here before:

        http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/ficino/

        John Uebersax
      • John Uebersax
        To those who might be interested -- there s now an entry for Ficino in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.  A few months old, but I don t think it s been
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 23 11:07 AM
          To those who might be interested -- there's now an entry for Ficino in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.  A few months old, but I don't think it's been mentioned here before:

          http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/ficino/

          John Uebersax
        • vaeringjar
          Thanks for pointing this out. Nice to see him get an entry there. Most the ancient Neoplatonists are represented now, but I don t think Iamblichus has gotten
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 24 9:52 AM
            Thanks for pointing this out. Nice to see him get an entry there.

            Most the ancient Neoplatonists are represented now, but I don't think Iamblichus has gotten one, has he? As I recall, it took a while for Porphyry to appear.

            Dennis Clark

            --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, John Uebersax <john.uebersax@...> wrote:
            >
            > To those who might be interested -- there's now an entry for Ficino in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.  A few months old, but I don't think it's been mentioned here before:
            >
            > http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/ficino/
            >
            > John Uebersax
            >
          • Ted Hand
            Thanks very much to John for pointing this out. Still no mention of magic and astrology in the Ficino article huh? We don t see the same omission in the Pico
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 24 10:07 AM
              Thanks very much to John for pointing this out. Still no mention of magic
              and astrology in the Ficino article huh? We don't see the same omission
              in the Pico della Mirandola and H.C. Agrippa articles!

              Ted Hand
              http://renaissancemagic.blogspot.com/

              On Mon, Oct 24, 2011 at 9:52 AM, vaeringjar <vaeringjar@...> wrote:

              > **
              >
              >
              > Thanks for pointing this out. Nice to see him get an entry there.
              >
              > Most the ancient Neoplatonists are represented now, but I don't think
              > Iamblichus has gotten one, has he? As I recall, it took a while for Porphyry
              > to appear.
              >
              > Dennis Clark
              >
              >
              > --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, John Uebersax <john.uebersax@...>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > To those who might be interested -- there's now an entry for Ficino in
              > the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. A few months old, but I don't
              > think it's been mentioned here before:
              > >
              > > http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/ficino/
              > >
              > > John Uebersax
              > >
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Mark
              Hi, I know A.E. Taylor s study gets a bit more into the geometrical aspects, so maybe that source can help, if you haven t looked there - cool computer
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 27 10:51 AM
                Hi,

                I know A.E. Taylor's study gets a bit more into the geometrical aspects, so maybe that source can help, if you haven't looked there - cool computer graphics, btw

                Cheers,

                Mark
                http://mcgill.academia.edu/MarkLamarre

                --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, "Russ Kinter" <pyth7@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hello All,
                > While reading parts of F. M. Cornford's "Plato's Cosmology" for references
                > on the dodecahedron I came ran across Cornford's commentary on Timaeus 55
                > C-D, where Plato alludes to the possibility of five worlds rather than just
                > one. The commentary indicated that Plato's allusion was obscure with no real
                > solution or one that depended on Plato recognizing the aether as an element
                > for which there isn't any evidence as such in his dialogues.
                > Cornford's puzzled statements have me a little bewildered because it seems
                > to me there is a very simple and elegant answer -maybe a little too simple
                > and pat which is why I am posting here. Has anyone ever considered that the
                > five worlds are found in the five equal interconnected cubes that can
                > implicitly share vertexes with a dodecahedron? I put together a hasty web
                > page with screen shots of models (expressing three dimensional ideas in text
                > is inefficient at best) to demonstrate my point:
                >
                > http://www.deepmatrix.org/five_cubes_with_dodecahedron/
                >
                > It is a little hard for me to believe Cornford and previous authorities
                > ignored or were unaware of this solution, so what is wrong with it?
                >
                > Thanks!
                > Russ Kinter
                >
                > "All the fires of Cain's motivation cannot burn a love that's sound." -
                > Stacy Sutherland
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
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