Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [neoplatonism] Query: Neoplatonism and Nature

Expand Messages
  • Thomas Mether
    PS. Any secondary stuff on Neoplatonism and technology? THX ... From: Thomas Mether Subject: [neoplatonism] Query: Neoplatonism and Nature
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 9, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      PS. Any secondary stuff on Neoplatonism and technology? THX

      --- On Sat, 7/9/11, Thomas Mether <t_mether@...> wrote:


      From: Thomas Mether <t_mether@...>
      Subject: [neoplatonism] Query: Neoplatonism and Nature
      To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, July 9, 2011, 3:16 PM


       



      List,
       
      I presented a paper on an issue in contemporary science and philosophy of science that rehearses an earlier issue between an Aristotelian contemplative approach to nature vs. a Neo-Platonic operational art approach to nature in the early modern era and in early science (the debate was never resolved).
       
      Researching that: I've expanded my reading and research to look at the ancient Neoplatonists and "natural philosophy" -- maybe also, anything on Neoplatonism and crafts, operational art, etc.
       
      So far, I've been re-reading secondary sources books in my collection before I head off to the Vandy library this week.
       
      These are:
       
      Siorvanes, Proclus: Neo-Platonic Philosophy and Science
       
      Wagner, Neoplatonism and Nature
       
      Chiaradonna and Trabattoni, Physics and Philosophy of Nature in Greek Neoplatonism
       
      Majumbar, Plotinus on the Appearance of Time and the World of Sense.
       
      Any other recommendations?
       
      Thanks,
      Thomas

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Tzvi Langermann
      Well, if you want to look at alchemy as a technology or operational art, then you can have fun looking at the purported connections between neoplatonism and
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 10, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Well, if you want to look at alchemy as a technology or operational art, then you can have fun looking at the purported connections between neoplatonism and alchemy. Paul Kraus' Jabir et la science grecque is still unsurpassed, and you can find neo-Platonisme and other goodies in the index.

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Thomas Mether
        Sent: 07/09/11 11:27 PM
        To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] Query: Neoplatonism and Nature

        PS. Any secondary stuff on Neoplatonism and technology? THX

        --- On Sat, 7/9/11, Thomas Mether < t_mether%2540yahoo.com > wrote:

        From: Thomas Mether < t_mether%2540yahoo.com >
        Subject: [neoplatonism] Query: Neoplatonism and Nature
        To: neoplatonism%2540yahoogroups.com
        Date: Saturday, July 9, 2011, 3:16 PM



        List,

        I presented a paper on an issue in contemporary science and philosophy of science that rehearses an earlier issue between an Aristotelian contemplative approach to nature vs. a Neo-Platonic operational art approach to nature in the early modern era and in early science (the debate was never resolved).

        Researching that: I've expanded my reading and research to look at the ancient Neoplatonists and "natural philosophy" -- maybe also, anything on Neoplatonism and crafts, operational art, etc.

        So far, I've been re-reading secondary sources books in my collection before I head off to the Vandy library this week.

        These are:

        Siorvanes, Proclus: Neo-Platonic Philosophy and Science

        Wagner, Neoplatonism and Nature

        Chiaradonna and Trabattoni, Physics and Philosophy of Nature in Greek Neoplatonism

        Majumbar, Plotinus on the Appearance of Time and the World of Sense.

        Any other recommendations?

        Thanks,
        Thomas

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • vaeringjar
        It s very early here, this morning, and my mind is hardly awake yet, but I was wondering if you have looked at Giordano Bruno at all in this context - big
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 10, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          It's very early here, this morning, and my mind is hardly awake yet, but I was wondering if you have looked at Giordano Bruno at all in this context - big subject, I know, and I read so much about him probably ten years ago now, including Francis Yates' book, which as I recall has some slips here and there, but I like her work a lot. You said early modern period somewhere down there below, so that tripped this switch in my head. I find that period most fascinating, and of course Dr Dee most interesting as well. Robert Fludd, the Rosicrucians, not that I follow much any of that thought myself, but I just find that last "flowering" of pre-"scientific" thought most curious.

          Ugh, that word, "scientific". Say it and it's like all the thought has to go right out the room, and in comes the drudge...


          Dennis Clark

          --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, Thomas Mether <t_mether@...> wrote:
          >
          > List,
          >  
          > I presented a paper on an issue in contemporary science and philosophy of science that rehearses an earlier issue between an Aristotelian contemplative approach to nature vs. a Neo-Platonic operational art approach to nature in the early modern era and in early science (the debate was never resolved).
          >  
          > Researching that: I've expanded my reading and research to look at the ancient Neoplatonists and "natural philosophy" -- maybe also, anything on Neoplatonism and crafts, operational art, etc.
          >  
          > So far, I've been re-reading secondary sources books in my collection before I head off to the Vandy library this week.
          >  
          > These are:
          >  
          > Siorvanes, Proclus: Neo-Platonic Philosophy and Science
          >  
          > Wagner, Neoplatonism and Nature
          >  
          > Chiaradonna and Trabattoni, Physics and Philosophy of Nature in Greek Neoplatonism
          >  
          > Majumbar, Plotinus on the Appearance of Time and the World of Sense.
          >  
          > Any other recommendations?
          >  
          > Thanks,
          > Thomas
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Nyk Cowham
          If we are including Medieval and Renaissance period then I would suggest the Catalan philosopher Ramon Lull, Roger Bacon, the Renaissance mathematician
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 10, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            If we are including Medieval and Renaissance period then I would suggest the
            Catalan philosopher Ramon Lull, Roger Bacon, the Renaissance mathematician
            Nicholas of Cusa and Sir Francis Bacon in the late English Renaissance.

            In ancient times most of the Neoplatonists who were interested in the
            natural sciences were in Alexandria. The only names to come immediately to
            mind in that context is Hypatia, and possibly Heron (though an inventor and
            mathematician I am not sure if he had any metaphysical leanings at all).

            Regards,

            Nyk

            On 11 July 2011 00:20, vaeringjar <vaeringjar@...> wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > It's very early here, this morning, and my mind is hardly awake yet, but I
            > was wondering if you have looked at Giordano Bruno at all in this context -
            > big subject, I know, and I read so much about him probably ten years ago
            > now, including Francis Yates' book, which as I recall has some slips here
            > and there, but I like her work a lot. You said early modern period somewhere
            > down there below, so that tripped this switch in my head. I find that period
            > most fascinating, and of course Dr Dee most interesting as well. Robert
            > Fludd, the Rosicrucians, not that I follow much any of that thought myself,
            > but I just find that last "flowering" of pre-"scientific" thought most
            > curious.
            >
            > Ugh, that word, "scientific". Say it and it's like all the thought has to
            > go right out the room, and in comes the drudge...
            >
            > Dennis Clark
            >
            >
            > --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, Thomas Mether <t_mether@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > List,
            > >
            > > I presented a paper on an issue in contemporary science and philosophy of
            > science that rehearses an earlier issue between an Aristotelian
            > contemplative approach to nature vs. a Neo-Platonic operational art approach
            > to nature in the early modern era and in early science (the debate was never
            > resolved).
            > >
            > > Researching that: I've expanded my reading and research to look at the
            > ancient Neoplatonists and "natural philosophy" -- maybe also, anything on
            > Neoplatonism and crafts, operational art, etc.
            > >
            > > So far, I've been re-reading secondary sources books in my collection
            > before I head off to the Vandy library this week.
            > >
            > > These are:
            > >
            > > Siorvanes, Proclus: Neo-Platonic Philosophy and Science
            > >
            > > Wagner, Neoplatonism and Nature
            > >
            > > Chiaradonna and Trabattoni, Physics and Philosophy of Nature in Greek
            > Neoplatonism
            > >
            > > Majumbar, Plotinus on the Appearance of Time and the World of Sense.
            > >
            > > Any other recommendations?
            > >
            > > Thanks,
            > > Thomas
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Giannis Stamatellos
            Dear Dennis, You correctly mention the case of Giordano Bruno. The Neoplatonic tradition can be traced in Bruno s work and it is noteworthy that he refers by
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 10, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Dear Dennis,

              You correctly mention the case of Giordano Bruno. The Neoplatonic tradition can
              be traced in Bruno's work and it is noteworthy that he refers by name several
              time to Plotinus.
              I would recommend to see: Catana, L. (2005) The Concept of contraction in
              Giordano Bruno's philosophy Ashgate.

              All the best,
              Giannis



              ________________________________
              From: vaeringjar <vaeringjar@...>
              To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sun, July 10, 2011 8:20:27 PM
              Subject: [neoplatonism] Re: Query: Neoplatonism and Nature


              It's very early here, this morning, and my mind is hardly awake yet, but I was
              wondering if you have looked at Giordano Bruno at all in this context - big
              subject, I know, and I read so much about him probably ten years ago now,
              including Francis Yates' book, which as I recall has some slips here and there,
              but I like her work a lot. You said early modern period somewhere down there
              below, so that tripped this switch in my head. I find that period most
              fascinating, and of course Dr Dee most interesting as well. Robert Fludd, the
              Rosicrucians, not that I follow much any of that thought myself, but I just find
              that last "flowering" of pre-"scientific" thought most curious.


              Ugh, that word, "scientific". Say it and it's like all the thought has to go
              right out the room, and in comes the drudge...

              Dennis Clark

              --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, Thomas Mether <t_mether@...> wrote:
              >
              > List,
              >
              > I presented a paper on an issue in contemporary science and philosophy of
              >science that rehearses an earlier issue between an Aristotelian contemplative
              >approach to nature vs. a Neo-Platonic operational art approach to nature in the
              >early modern era and in early science (the debate was never resolved).
              >
              > Researching that: I've expanded my reading and research to look at the ancient
              >Neoplatonists and "natural philosophy" -- maybe also, anything on Neoplatonism
              >and crafts, operational art, etc.
              >
              > So far, I've been re-reading secondary sources books in my collection before I
              >head off to the Vandy library this week.
              >
              > These are:
              >
              > Siorvanes, Proclus: Neo-Platonic Philosophy and Science
              >
              > Wagner, Neoplatonism and Nature
              >
              > Chiaradonna and Trabattoni, Physics and Philosophy of Nature in Greek
              >Neoplatonism
              >
              > Majumbar, Plotinus on the Appearance of Time and the World of Sense.
              >
              > Any other recommendations?
              >
              > Thanks,
              > Thomas
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Adamson, Peter
              Hello all, A very good book on conceptions of nature in Proclus is: M. Martijn, Proclus on Nature. Philosophy of Nature and its Methods in Proclus’
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 10, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                Hello all,

                A very good book on conceptions of nature in Proclus is:

                M. Martijn, Proclus on Nature. Philosophy of Nature and its Methods in Proclus’ Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus (Leiden: Brill, 2010).

                Best,
                Peter

                peter.adamson@...

                Philosophy Dept.
                King's College London
                Strand
                London WC2R 2LS

                The History of Philosophy Podcast
                http://www.historyofphilosophy.net
                ________________________________________
                From: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com [neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Giannis Stamatellos [gstamap@...]
                Sent: Sunday, July 10, 2011 11:07 PM
                To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] Re: Query: Neoplatonism and Nature

                Dear Dennis,

                You correctly mention the case of Giordano Bruno. The Neoplatonic tradition can
                be traced in Bruno's work and it is noteworthy that he refers by name several
                time to Plotinus.
                I would recommend to see: Catana, L. (2005) The Concept of contraction in
                Giordano Bruno's philosophy Ashgate.

                All the best,
                Giannis

                ________________________________
                From: vaeringjar <vaeringjar@...<mailto:vaeringjar%40yahoo.com>>
                To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com<mailto:neoplatonism%40yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Sun, July 10, 2011 8:20:27 PM
                Subject: [neoplatonism] Re: Query: Neoplatonism and Nature

                It's very early here, this morning, and my mind is hardly awake yet, but I was
                wondering if you have looked at Giordano Bruno at all in this context - big
                subject, I know, and I read so much about him probably ten years ago now,
                including Francis Yates' book, which as I recall has some slips here and there,
                but I like her work a lot. You said early modern period somewhere down there
                below, so that tripped this switch in my head. I find that period most
                fascinating, and of course Dr Dee most interesting as well. Robert Fludd, the
                Rosicrucians, not that I follow much any of that thought myself, but I just find
                that last "flowering" of pre-"scientific" thought most curious.

                Ugh, that word, "scientific". Say it and it's like all the thought has to go
                right out the room, and in comes the drudge...

                Dennis Clark

                --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com<mailto:neoplatonism%40yahoogroups.com>, Thomas Mether <t_mether@...> wrote:
                >
                > List,
                >
                > I presented a paper on an issue in contemporary science and philosophy of
                >science that rehearses an earlier issue between an Aristotelian contemplative
                >approach to nature vs. a Neo-Platonic operational art approach to nature in the
                >early modern era and in early science (the debate was never resolved).
                >
                > Researching that: I've expanded my reading and research to look at the ancient
                >Neoplatonists and "natural philosophy" -- maybe also, anything on Neoplatonism
                >and crafts, operational art, etc.
                >
                > So far, I've been re-reading secondary sources books in my collection before I
                >head off to the Vandy library this week.
                >
                > These are:
                >
                > Siorvanes, Proclus: Neo-Platonic Philosophy and Science
                >
                > Wagner, Neoplatonism and Nature
                >
                > Chiaradonna and Trabattoni, Physics and Philosophy of Nature in Greek
                >Neoplatonism
                >
                > Majumbar, Plotinus on the Appearance of Time and the World of Sense.
                >
                > Any other recommendations?
                >
                > Thanks,
                > Thomas
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Thomas Mether
                Yes, thanks, I have that already and I m looking at theurgy as operational art too. The scope of the research is to examine what texts and/or practicies would
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 14, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  Yes, thanks, I have that already and I'm looking at theurgy as operational art too. The scope of the research is to examine what texts and/or practicies would have been available to the Renaissance and early modern precursors to modern science as a follow up a paper I gave at the ISNS conference. The focus is examining the operational act or experiment as "microcosm". This old and unresolved issue has re-emerged in contemporary philosophy of science. The issue was originally posed in Neoplatonist terms but the contemporary discussion of this Neoplatonic legacy in modern science is being discussed by mainly analytic philosophers, and some continental philosophers (Catholic, Marxist), with limited knowledge of the original Neoplatonic terms and conceptuality in which the debate was posed.
                   
                  Anyway, alchemy, theurgy, and natural magic are included in "operational art".
                   
                  Thanks, Thomas
                   
                  --- On Sun, 7/10/11, Tzvi Langermann <langermann@...> wrote:


                  From: Tzvi Langermann <langermann@...>
                  Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] Query: Neoplatonism and Nature
                  To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Sunday, July 10, 2011, 8:09 AM


                   



                  Well, if you want to look at alchemy as a technology or operational art, then you can have fun looking at the purported connections between neoplatonism and alchemy. Paul Kraus' Jabir et la science grecque is still unsurpassed, and you can find neo-Platonisme and other goodies in the index.

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Thomas Mether
                  Sent: 07/09/11 11:27 PM
                  To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] Query: Neoplatonism and Nature

                  PS. Any secondary stuff on Neoplatonism and technology? THX

                  --- On Sat, 7/9/11, Thomas Mether < t_mether%2540yahoo.com > wrote:

                  From: Thomas Mether < t_mether%2540yahoo.com >
                  Subject: [neoplatonism] Query: Neoplatonism and Nature
                  To: neoplatonism%2540yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Saturday, July 9, 2011, 3:16 PM

                  List,

                  I presented a paper on an issue in contemporary science and philosophy of science that rehearses an earlier issue between an Aristotelian contemplative approach to nature vs. a Neo-Platonic operational art approach to nature in the early modern era and in early science (the debate was never resolved).

                  Researching that: I've expanded my reading and research to look at the ancient Neoplatonists and "natural philosophy" -- maybe also, anything on Neoplatonism and crafts, operational art, etc.

                  So far, I've been re-reading secondary sources books in my collection before I head off to the Vandy library this week.

                  These are:

                  Siorvanes, Proclus: Neo-Platonic Philosophy and Science

                  Wagner, Neoplatonism and Nature

                  Chiaradonna and Trabattoni, Physics and Philosophy of Nature in Greek Neoplatonism

                  Majumbar, Plotinus on the Appearance of Time and the World of Sense.

                  Any other recommendations?

                  Thanks,
                  Thomas

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Thomas Mether
                  Dennis,   Yes, I ve looked at them. There is much new history of science studies out that follows, deepens, and extends Yates work. The core issue I m
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jul 14, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Dennis,
                     
                    Yes, I've looked at them. There is much new history of science studies out that follows, deepens, and extends Yates' work. The core issue I'm looking at is the operational act (precursor to the modern experiment according to a slew of new studies) is construed as a microcosm. Related is the "power-concepts" used in the operational arts. Contemporary discussion of experiments as production and their results as technological products (that then answer yes or no questions to theory predictions) in terms of power concepts use power concepts drawn from modern political theory. Yet, the inherited discussion was originally posed in terms of Neoplatonic concepts. Thus articulated, operational art revealing the hidden secrets of nature was sort of a microcosmic epiphany instead of technological "coercion", "domination", "oppression", "manipulation", "inhibition", or "restraint" (all identified as distinctly modern political concepts as several philosophers of
                    science note when they argue the concepts they have been using in the contemporary discussions come from a later time and may be the wrong ones).
                     
                    Thomas

                    --- On Sun, 7/10/11, vaeringjar <vaeringjar@...> wrote:


                    From: vaeringjar <vaeringjar@...>
                    Subject: [neoplatonism] Re: Query: Neoplatonism and Nature
                    To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Sunday, July 10, 2011, 12:20 PM


                     



                    It's very early here, this morning, and my mind is hardly awake yet, but I was wondering if you have looked at Giordano Bruno at all in this context - big subject, I know, and I read so much about him probably ten years ago now, including Francis Yates' book, which as I recall has some slips here and there, but I like her work a lot. You said early modern period somewhere down there below, so that tripped this switch in my head. I find that period most fascinating, and of course Dr Dee most interesting as well. Robert Fludd, the Rosicrucians, not that I follow much any of that thought myself, but I just find that last "flowering" of pre-"scientific" thought most curious.

                    Ugh, that word, "scientific". Say it and it's like all the thought has to go right out the room, and in comes the drudge...

                    Dennis Clark

                    --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, Thomas Mether <t_mether@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > List,
                    >  
                    > I presented a paper on an issue in contemporary science and philosophy of science that rehearses an earlier issue between an Aristotelian contemplative approach to nature vs. a Neo-Platonic operational art approach to nature in the early modern era and in early science (the debate was never resolved).
                    >  
                    > Researching that: I've expanded my reading and research to look at the ancient Neoplatonists and "natural philosophy" -- maybe also, anything on Neoplatonism and crafts, operational art, etc.
                    >  
                    > So far, I've been re-reading secondary sources books in my collection before I head off to the Vandy library this week.
                    >  
                    > These are:
                    >  
                    > Siorvanes, Proclus: Neo-Platonic Philosophy and Science
                    >  
                    > Wagner, Neoplatonism and Nature
                    >  
                    > Chiaradonna and Trabattoni, Physics and Philosophy of Nature in Greek Neoplatonism
                    >  
                    > Majumbar, Plotinus on the Appearance of Time and the World of Sense.
                    >  
                    > Any other recommendations?
                    >  
                    > Thanks,
                    > Thomas
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >








                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Thomas Mether
                    Thanks Peter, I just bought it on Amazon. I told my wife it is a belated Father s Day present from her. I hope I get away with it.   Thomas ... From: Adamson,
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jul 14, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Thanks Peter, I just bought it on Amazon. I told my wife it is a belated Father's Day present from her. I hope I get away with it.
                       
                      Thomas

                      --- On Sun, 7/10/11, Adamson, Peter <peter.adamson@...> wrote:


                      From: Adamson, Peter <peter.adamson@...>
                      Subject: RE: [neoplatonism] Re: Query: Neoplatonism and Nature
                      To: "neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com" <neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com>
                      Date: Sunday, July 10, 2011, 5:28 PM


                      Hello all,

                      A very good book on conceptions of nature in Proclus is:

                      M. Martijn, Proclus on Nature. Philosophy of Nature and its Methods in Proclus’ Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus (Leiden: Brill, 2010).

                      Best,
                      Peter

                      peter.adamson@...

                      Philosophy Dept.
                      King's College London
                      Strand
                      London WC2R 2LS

                      The History of Philosophy Podcast
                      http://www.historyofphilosophy.net
                      ________________________________________
                      From: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com [neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Giannis Stamatellos [gstamap@...]
                      Sent: Sunday, July 10, 2011 11:07 PM
                      To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] Re: Query: Neoplatonism and Nature

                      Dear Dennis,

                      You correctly mention the case of Giordano Bruno. The Neoplatonic tradition can
                      be traced in Bruno's work and it is noteworthy that he refers by name several
                      time to Plotinus.
                      I would recommend to see: Catana, L. (2005) The Concept of contraction in
                      Giordano Bruno's philosophy Ashgate.

                      All the best,
                      Giannis

                      ________________________________
                      From: vaeringjar <vaeringjar@...<mailto:vaeringjar%40yahoo.com>>
                      To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com<mailto:neoplatonism%40yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Sun, July 10, 2011 8:20:27 PM
                      Subject: [neoplatonism] Re: Query: Neoplatonism and Nature

                      It's very early here, this morning, and my mind is hardly awake yet, but I was
                      wondering if you have looked at Giordano Bruno at all in this context - big
                      subject, I know, and I read so much about him probably ten years ago now,
                      including Francis Yates' book, which as I recall has some slips here and there,
                      but I like her work a lot. You said early modern period somewhere down there
                      below, so that tripped this switch in my head. I find that period most
                      fascinating, and of course Dr Dee most interesting as well. Robert Fludd, the
                      Rosicrucians, not that I follow much any of that thought myself, but I just find
                      that last "flowering" of pre-"scientific" thought most curious.

                      Ugh, that word, "scientific". Say it and it's like all the thought has to go
                      right out the room, and in comes the drudge...

                      Dennis Clark

                      --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com<mailto:neoplatonism%40yahoogroups.com>, Thomas Mether <t_mether@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > List,
                      >
                      > I presented a paper on an issue in contemporary science and philosophy of
                      >science that rehearses an earlier issue between an Aristotelian contemplative
                      >approach to nature vs. a Neo-Platonic operational art approach to nature in the
                      >early modern era and in early science (the debate was never resolved).
                      >
                      > Researching that: I've expanded my reading and research to look at the ancient
                      >Neoplatonists and "natural philosophy" -- maybe also, anything on Neoplatonism
                      >and crafts, operational art, etc.
                      >
                      > So far, I've been re-reading secondary sources books in my collection before I
                      >head off to the Vandy library this week.
                      >
                      > These are:
                      >
                      > Siorvanes, Proclus: Neo-Platonic Philosophy and Science
                      >
                      > Wagner, Neoplatonism and Nature
                      >
                      > Chiaradonna and Trabattoni, Physics and Philosophy of Nature in Greek
                      >Neoplatonism
                      >
                      > Majumbar, Plotinus on the Appearance of Time and the World of Sense.
                      >
                      > Any other recommendations?
                      >
                      > Thanks,
                      > Thomas
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                      ------------------------------------

                      Yahoo! Groups Links





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.