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Catching Up: Ishraqi Earl

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  • Thomas Mether
    Dear Earl,   I am trying to catch up in a back-log of emails. In terms of extra-Muslim forms of the Ishraqi tradition there seem to be both early and late. I
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 28, 2011
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      Dear Earl,
       
      I am trying to catch up in a back-log of emails. In terms of extra-Muslim forms of the Ishraqi tradition there seem to be both early and late. I recommended to you to look for sources in terms of Ibn Sina. One source was Lenn Goodman's book on Avicenna. The others I mentioned are more easily found in a centennial volume dedicated to Syrian and Arab Christianity in America dedicated to the Syrian Patriarch of Antioch and All the East, Ignatius and to the Syrian Metropolitan of America, Philip Saliba. But they are prominent scholars.
       
      Second, when I was in Tehran, I learned that the Ishraqi tradition as transmitted via Muslim lineages later included Zoroastrian and Christian lineages before, during and after Mulla Sadra. There were Zoroastrian ishraqis in Yazd under the Shah; Christian (mainly Armenian, ishraqis) in Shiraz at the time.
       
      The Zoroastrian lineage is earlier, check out fersendaji lineage (an ishraqi lineage taken to India and ending up an Islamic, Hindu, and Zoroastrian "heresy"); the eastern Christian one is more diffuse, but, has some connections to the later Shia school that led to the Bahai's (as a long-term offspring from Mulla Sadra and the Sheikhi school). 
       
      But the original articles I referred to indicate the ishraqi tradition goes back to Syrian Christian sources.
       
      Best, Thomas




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    • Thomas Mether
      PS. Correction: I meant that the articles dedicated in the volume dedicated to Patriarch Ignatius of Antioch and All the East and to Metropolitan Philip Saliba
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 28, 2011
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        PS. Correction: I meant that the articles dedicated in the volume dedicated to Patriarch Ignatius of Antioch and All the East and to Metropolitan Philip Saliba were written by prominent scholars. The sentence below as typed indicates Sayyidna Ignatius and Philip
        were the scholars I referrred to. Sorry for any confusion.
         

        --- On Mon, 2/28/11, Thomas Mether <t_mether@...> wrote:


        From: Thomas Mether <t_mether@...>
        Subject: [neoplatonism] Catching Up: Ishraqi Earl
        To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, February 28, 2011, 6:11 PM


         



        Dear Earl,
         
        I am trying to catch up in a back-log of emails. In terms of extra-Muslim forms of the Ishraqi tradition there seem to be both early and late. I recommended to you to look for sources in terms of Ibn Sina. One source was Lenn Goodman's book on Avicenna. The others I mentioned are more easily found in a centennial volume dedicated to Syrian and Arab Christianity in America dedicated to the Syrian Patriarch of Antioch and All the East, Ignatius and to the Syrian Metropolitan of America, Philip Saliba. But they are prominent scholars.
         
        Second, when I was in Tehran, I learned that the Ishraqi tradition as transmitted via Muslim lineages later included Zoroastrian and Christian lineages before, during and after Mulla Sadra. There were Zoroastrian ishraqis in Yazd under the Shah; Christian (mainly Armenian, ishraqis) in Shiraz at the time.
         
        The Zoroastrian lineage is earlier, check out fersendaji lineage (an ishraqi lineage taken to India and ending up an Islamic, Hindu, and Zoroastrian "heresy"); the eastern Christian one is more diffuse, but, has some connections to the later Shia school that led to the Bahai's (as a long-term offspring from Mulla Sadra and the Sheikhi school). 
         
        But the original articles I referred to indicate the ishraqi tradition goes back to Syrian Christian sources.
         
        Best, Thomas

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