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RE: Query Re: [neoplatonism] Re: The Greek Commentaries on the Phaedo

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  • Jesse Corradino
    Prepare to be Steinmetzed. ... _________________________________________________________________ Find the right PC with Windows 7 and Windows Live.
    Message 1 of 39 , Nov 7, 2009
      Prepare to be Steinmetzed.

      > To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
      > From: goya@...
      > Date: Sat, 7 Nov 2009 20:30:17 +0100
      > Subject: Re: Query Re: [neoplatonism] Re: The Greek Commentaries on the Phaedo
      >
      >
      > On Nov 7, 2009, at 7:39 PM, Curt Steinmetz wrote:
      >
      > > John Uebersax wrote:
      > > > (Although didn't Pletho eventually return to Greece -- Mistra --
      > > and set up some kind of school there?)
      > > >
      > >
      > > George Gemistos Plethon lived the last half of his very long (~100
      > > years) life in exile in Mistra, which is widely reported to have
      > > been a
      > > hotbed of old-school "Hellenism", ie, Graeco-Roman polytheistic
      > > Paganism. He died in 1452 and his posthumously discovered secret
      > > writings proved beyond any doubt that he had rejected Christianity (if
      > > indeed he had ever been a Christian) in favor of what some have termed
      > > "Platonic Paganism". On that specific point see for example John
      > > Monfasani's "Platonic Paganism in the Fifteenth Century".`
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > There was nothing "secret" about Pletho's writings: some were
      > addressed to the emperor Manuel, and they gave rise to lively
      > controversies during his lifetime, particularly with Scholarios. It is
      > true that after his death, Scholarios, then Patriarch of
      > Constantinople, ordered his *Laws* to be burnt. We know nothing about
      > Pletho's teaching activity prior to his exile to Misra, but it is
      > *highly* unlikely, that he was in any relation of continuity to
      > Psellos. Opinions diverge on the extent to which Pletho may have been
      > influenced by Florentine Platonism, or whether he was himself a major
      > source of that movement.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Michael Chase
      > (goya@...)
      > CNRS UPR 76
      > 7, rue Guy Moquet
      > Villejuif 94801
      > France
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
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      >

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    • vaeringjar
      ... I took a brief look online and only came up with the usual Wikipedia and Encyclopedia Britannica entries - if they are to be trusted, yes, he also thought
      Message 39 of 39 , Nov 9, 2009
        --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, Thomas Mether <t_mether@...> wrote:
        >
        > Mike wrote:
        >  
        > "The Jesuit Jean Hardouin (1646-1729). According to him, most of 
        > classical literature was a forgery by 13h century Benedictine monks."
        >  
        > Isn't this the guy who claimed Greek New Testament manuscripts were spurious because the New Testament was originally Latin? I got that way back in the 70s in an undergraduate New Testament criticism textbook, if I'm remembering correctly.
        >  
        > Thomas
        >
        >

        I took a brief look online and only came up with the usual Wikipedia and Encyclopedia Britannica entries - if they are to be trusted, yes, he also thought the NT was originally written in Latin. He edited Themistius, had a number of other accomplishments, and then started churning out these bizarre theories. The Georgics apparently he thought to be by Virgil, but not the Aeneid. You have to wonder if perhaps he had some illness later in life that set him down that path.

        Dennis Clark
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