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Latest IJPT Journal Reviews

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  • vaeringjar
    I just received the latest IJPT issue, and it has a great number of interesting book reviews this time around. Two I particularly homed in on, of Hans
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 23, 2009
      I just received the latest IJPT issue, and it has a great number of interesting book reviews this time around. Two I particularly homed in on, of Hans Baltussen's new book on Simplicius by Prof. Dillon, and one by Prof. Finamore on the Sorabji and Sharples edited collection <<Greek and Roman Philosophy 100 BC to 200 AD>>, which sounds pretty much indispensable from his review.

      I found two more reviews of the Simplicius book online - I gather this must be the first full length book study devoted to him, though it sounds as if Baltussen does not however devote too much time to Simplicius as a philosopher in his own right as far as his own doctrine would be concerned - but as Iam Mueller in his Bryn Mawr review points out, could anyone achieve much there? Though I do remember reading something apparently of Simplicius' own very briefly on first principles offerred at the beginning of his commentary on Epictetus (or I think it was there). Certainly it is nice to see him studied on his own and not just as a mine for earlier quotations. The Bryn Mawr review goes a bit into a discussion of just why Simplicius wrote his commentaries, since they are not as so many later ones "apo phones" by a student - so who was the real intended audience? Was he perhaps to some extent just really writing for us, for the future, trying to preserve, knowing that soon the game would be up?

      Here the links:

      http://ndpr.nd.edu/review.cfm?id=16125

      http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2009/2009-05-19.html

      Fortunately the University of Washington library already has both these books - I was unable to find them for sale anywhere online, including David Brown who normally carries both Duckworth and Institute of Classics - perhaps those in Europe and elsewhere have their own sources. I must say, for anyone visiting here in Seattle and and in need of something for reference, the UW library has a superb collection in the Neoplatonic area, and Classics in general (and easy parking is underground right below the library!). I think the extent of the coverage is a little suprising, since as far as I know there is no one there in Classics or Philosophy specializing in the field. (What is by the way going on there on with the whole West Coast on that score? We need more communion with the One out here, or something like that...) But maybe the library staff are just generally diligent and blessed with a nice budget. Things have certainly gotten very tight otherwise in the Washington state system with the economic downturn.

      Dennis Clark
    • leslie greenhill
      Does anyone know of a mention in ancient Greek literature of a measure called in English dolichos .  It was a measure of 12 stades. P.O. Box 314 Mentone,
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 23, 2009
        Does anyone know of a mention in ancient Greek literature of a measure called in English "dolichos".  It was a measure of 12 stades.

        P.O. Box 314
        Mentone, Victoria 3194 Australia
        Email: neoplatonist2000@...

        --- On Sat, 24/10/09, vaeringjar <vaeringjar@...> wrote:


        From: vaeringjar <vaeringjar@...>
        Subject: [neoplatonism] Latest IJPT Journal Reviews
        To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
        Received: Saturday, 24 October, 2009, 11:03 AM


         



        I just received the latest IJPT issue, and it has a great number of interesting book reviews this time around. Two I particularly homed in on, of Hans Baltussen's new book on Simplicius by Prof. Dillon, and one by Prof. Finamore on the Sorabji and Sharples edited collection <<Greek and Roman Philosophy 100 BC to 200 AD>>, which sounds pretty much indispensable from his review.

        I found two more reviews of the Simplicius book online - I gather this must be the first full length book study devoted to him, though it sounds as if Baltussen does not however devote too much time to Simplicius as a philosopher in his own right as far as his own doctrine would be concerned - but as Iam Mueller in his Bryn Mawr review points out, could anyone achieve much there? Though I do remember reading something apparently of Simplicius' own very briefly on first principles offerred at the beginning of his commentary on Epictetus (or I think it was there). Certainly it is nice to see him studied on his own and not just as a mine for earlier quotations. The Bryn Mawr review goes a bit into a discussion of just why Simplicius wrote his commentaries, since they are not as so many later ones "apo phones" by a student - so who was the real intended audience? Was he perhaps to some extent just really writing for us, for the future, trying to preserve,
        knowing that soon the game would be up?

        Here the links:

        http://ndpr. nd.edu/review. cfm?id=16125

        http://bmcr. brynmawr. edu/2009/ 2009-05-19. html

        Fortunately the University of Washington library already has both these books - I was unable to find them for sale anywhere online, including David Brown who normally carries both Duckworth and Institute of Classics - perhaps those in Europe and elsewhere have their own sources. I must say, for anyone visiting here in Seattle and and in need of something for reference, the UW library has a superb collection in the Neoplatonic area, and Classics in general (and easy parking is underground right below the library!). I think the extent of the coverage is a little suprising, since as far as I know there is no one there in Classics or Philosophy specializing in the field. (What is by the way going on there on with the whole West Coast on that score? We need more communion with the One out here, or something like that...) But maybe the library staff are just generally diligent and blessed with a nice budget. Things have certainly gotten very tight otherwise in
        the Washington state system with the economic downturn.

        Dennis Clark

















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      • Michael Chase
        ... Yes, but not very many. The earliest mention seems to be in Heron of Alexandria, Geometrica 4, 13, 26. Cf. Suda s.v. In the 13th cent., Zonaras informs us
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 24, 2009
          On Oct 24, 2009, at 2:28 AM, leslie greenhill wrote:

          > Does anyone know of a mention in ancient Greek literature of a
          > measure called in English "dolichos". It was a measure of 12 stades.
          >




          Yes, but not very many. The earliest mention seems to be in Heron of
          Alexandria, Geometrica 4, 13, 26. Cf. Suda s.v. In the 13th cent.,
          Zonaras informs us a dolichos contains twenty stadia.

          Best, Mike

          >

          Michael Chase
          (goya@...)
          CNRS UPR 76
          7, rue Guy Moquet
          Villejuif 94801
          France



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Michael Chase
          ... M.C. I don t know if he s still there, but for many years S. Marc Cohen was at UW (translator of Ammonius In Cat. for the Sorabji series, inter alia) ...
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 24, 2009
            On Oct 24, 2009, at 2:03 AM, vaeringjar wrote:

            > I
            >
            > Fortunately the University of Washington library already has both
            > these books - I was unable to find them for sale anywhere online,
            > including David Brown who normally carries both Duckworth and
            > Institute of Classics - perhaps those in Europe and elsewhere have
            > their own sources. I must say, for anyone visiting here in Seattle
            > and and in need of something for reference, the UW library has a
            > superb collection in the Neoplatonic area, and Classics in general
            > (and easy parking is underground right below the library!). I think
            > the extent of the coverage is a little suprising, since as far as I
            > know there is no one there in Classics or Philosophy specializing in
            > the field.
            >













            M.C. I don't know if he's still there, but for many years S. Marc
            Cohen was at UW (translator of Ammonius In Cat. for the Sorabji
            series, inter alia)


            > (What is by the way going on there on with the whole West Coast on
            > that score? We need more communion with the One out here, or
            > something like that...)
            >




            M.C. I agree. For years, Bob Todd was responsible for keeping UBC's
            library well-stocked with Neoplatonica, but he has now retired. Taneli
            Kukkonen managed to improve the holdings of University of Victoria
            library, but he left after only a couple of years, and has now been
            replaced by a Latin Medievalist

            Best, Mike
            >



            Michael Chase
            (goya@...)
            CNRS UPR 76
            7, rue Guy Moquet
            Villejuif 94801
            France



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • leslie greenhill
            Many thanks Mike   I am presently writing a paper which demonstrates that Plato s design for Atlantis was taken from an earlier Pythagorean work.  If that
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 24, 2009
              Many thanks Mike
               
              I am presently writing a paper which demonstrates that Plato's design for Atlantis was taken from an earlier Pythagorean work.  If that proves to be correct, (and it is) you will understand the implications.  The Romans had a 12 stade measure called the "league".  The paper will also demonstrate that Vitruvius used the same formulation for central Atlantis twice. 
               
              Thanks again for the prompt reply.
               
              Les

              P.O. Box 314
              Mentone, Victoria 3194 Australia
              Email: neoplatonist2000@...

              --- On Sat, 24/10/09, Michael Chase <goya@...> wrote:


              From: Michael Chase <goya@...>
              Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] Greek measure
              To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
              Received: Saturday, 24 October, 2009, 7:32 PM


               




              On Oct 24, 2009, at 2:28 AM, leslie greenhill wrote:

              > Does anyone know of a mention in ancient Greek literature of a
              > measure called in English "dolichos". It was a measure of 12 stades.
              >

              Yes, but not very many. The earliest mention seems to be in Heron of
              Alexandria, Geometrica 4, 13, 26. Cf. Suda s.v. In the 13th cent.,
              Zonaras informs us a dolichos contains twenty stadia.

              Best, Mike

              >

              Michael Chase
              (goya@.... fr)
              CNRS UPR 76
              7, rue Guy Moquet
              Villejuif 94801
              France

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

















              __________________________________________________________________________________
              Get more done like never before with Yahoo!7 Mail.
              Learn more: http://au.overview.mail.yahoo.com/

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Suzanne Stern-Gillet
              Dear Colleague, As the co-editor of the JPT responsible for selecting the books for review and to allocate them to willing reviewers, I am pleased to see that
              Message 6 of 8 , Oct 25, 2009
                Dear Colleague,



                As the co-editor of the JPT responsible for selecting the books for review
                and to allocate them to willing reviewers, I am pleased to see that some of
                the reviews at least are singled out for praise. Let me urge you also to
                read the others.



                Best,

                Suzanne Stern-Gillet

                From: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com [mailto:neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com] On
                Behalf Of vaeringjar
                Sent: 24 October 2009 01:03
                To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [neoplatonism] Latest IJPT Journal Reviews





                I just received the latest IJPT issue, and it has a great number of
                interesting book reviews this time around. Two I particularly homed in on,
                of Hans Baltussen's new book on Simplicius by Prof. Dillon, and one by Prof.
                Finamore on the Sorabji and Sharples edited collection <<Greek and Roman
                Philosophy 100 BC to 200 AD>>, which sounds pretty much indispensable from
                his review.

                I found two more reviews of the Simplicius book online - I gather this must
                be the first full length book study devoted to him, though it sounds as if
                Baltussen does not however devote too much time to Simplicius as a
                philosopher in his own right as far as his own doctrine would be concerned -
                but as Iam Mueller in his Bryn Mawr review points out, could anyone achieve
                much there? Though I do remember reading something apparently of Simplicius'
                own very briefly on first principles offerred at the beginning of his
                commentary on Epictetus (or I think it was there). Certainly it is nice to
                see him studied on his own and not just as a mine for earlier quotations.
                The Bryn Mawr review goes a bit into a discussion of just why Simplicius
                wrote his commentaries, since they are not as so many later ones "apo
                phones" by a student - so who was the real intended audience? Was he perhaps
                to some extent just really writing for us, for the future, trying to
                preserve, knowing that soon the game would be up?

                Here the links:

                http://ndpr.nd.edu/review.cfm?id=16125

                http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2009/2009-05-19.html

                Fortunately the University of Washington library already has both these
                books - I was unable to find them for sale anywhere online, including David
                Brown who normally carries both Duckworth and Institute of Classics -
                perhaps those in Europe and elsewhere have their own sources. I must say,
                for anyone visiting here in Seattle and and in need of something for
                reference, the UW library has a superb collection in the Neoplatonic area,
                and Classics in general (and easy parking is underground right below the
                library!). I think the extent of the coverage is a little suprising, since
                as far as I know there is no one there in Classics or Philosophy
                specializing in the field. (What is by the way going on there on with the
                whole West Coast on that score? We need more communion with the One out
                here, or something like that...) But maybe the library staff are just
                generally diligent and blessed with a nice budget. Things have certainly
                gotten very tight otherwise in the Washington state system with the economic
                downturn.

                Dennis Clark





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • vaeringjar
                ... Absolutely, thanks, and I have indeed read them all, in this issue and the past ones, and it s a great service to have so many Platonist experts now
                Message 7 of 8 , Oct 26, 2009
                  --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, "Suzanne Stern-Gillet" <s.stern-gillet@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Dear Colleague,
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > As the co-editor of the JPT responsible for selecting the books for review
                  > and to allocate them to willing reviewers, I am pleased to see that some of
                  > the reviews at least are singled out for praise. Let me urge you also to
                  > read the others.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Best,
                  >
                  > Suzanne Stern-Gillet
                  >

                  Absolutely, thanks, and I have indeed read them all, in this issue and the past ones, and it's a great service to have so many Platonist experts now reviewing publications in the field for a journal with a Platonist focus, and convenient to have them altogether in one journal, rather then having to search through BMCR et al hoping something has been reviewed. I mentioned those two reviews here mostly out of personal interest in their particular subject matter, and to raise to the group if anyone wanted to discuss them some of the issues brought up by Baltussen about Simplicius and his audience.

                  Dennis Clark
                • vaeringjar
                  ... I must have missed him, not looking outside of Classics at UW and he is in the Philosophy Dept. - according to his webpage at UW, he is now Emeritus, but
                  Message 8 of 8 , Oct 28, 2009
                    >
                    >
                    > M.C. I don't know if he's still there, but for many years S. Marc
                    > Cohen was at UW (translator of Ammonius In Cat. for the Sorabji
                    > series, inter alia)

                    I must have missed him, not looking outside of Classics at UW and he is in the Philosophy Dept. - according to his webpage at UW, he is now Emeritus, but still actively working on several aspects of Aristotle. In fact he did the page at the Stanford Encyclopedia on Aristotle's Metaphysics that he just revised in the last year.

                    Dennis Clark
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