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New Publication - Lucas Holstenius (1596-1661)

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  • Christoph Helmig
    Dear all, recently, I have noticed the publication of a nice little volume dedicated to Lucas Holstenius: Lucas Holstenius (1596-1661). Ein Hamburger Humanist
    Message 1 of 2 , May 31, 2009
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      Dear all,

      recently, I have noticed the publication of a nice little volume dedicated to Lucas Holstenius:

      Lucas Holstenius (1596-1661). Ein Hamburger Humanist im Rom des Barock. Material zur Geschichte seiner Handschriftenschenkung an die Stadtbibliothek Hamburg. Bearbeitet von Gernot Bühring, Eva Horváth, Marina Molin-Pradel, Burkhard Reis, Bianca-Jeanette Schröder, Hans-Walter Stork. Hg. von Hans-Walter Stork (Verein für katholische Kirchengeschichte in Hamburg und Schleswig-Holstein. Beiträge und Mitteilungen Bd. 9). Husum 2008.

      http://www.husum-verlag.de/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=2398

      Everyone interested in the history of Neoplatonic studies surely has
      heard Holstenius' name ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucas_Holstenius http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lukas_Holste).
      Since the book is likely to be advertised nowhere, I thought it
      would be useful to briefly mention it here. The elegantly made and rather inexpensive
      volume contains six articles by different scholars and a complete list
      of Holstenius' publications, plus a CD with scans of older studies on Holstenius.

      Of special interest is the paper by Burkhard Reis [the editor of Albinus' prologue], "Holstenius und die Neuplatoniker. Anmerkungen zu den Hamburger Handschriften aus dem Besitz des Lucas Holstenius", 57-99, which provides
      a nice survey of Holstenius' Studia Neoplatonica.

      Best,
      Christoph Helmig


      --
      Prof. Dr. Christoph Helmig
      Juniorprofessor für Klassische Philologie (Schwerpunkt Spätantike)
      Institut für Klassische Philologie /
      Graduate School of Ancient Philosophy
      Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
      Unter den Linden 6
      D-10099 Berlin
      Deutschland
    • vaeringjar
      ... Thanks, Christoph - I guess at least for me you just pointed out (yet another) Bildungsloch, as I had not been aware of his work. A couple of his editions
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 1, 2009
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        --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, Christoph Helmig <Christoph.Helmig@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dear all,
        >
        > recently, I have noticed the publication of a nice little volume dedicated to Lucas Holstenius:
        >
        > Lucas Holstenius (1596-1661). Ein Hamburger Humanist im Rom des Barock. Material zur Geschichte seiner Handschriftenschenkung an die Stadtbibliothek Hamburg. Bearbeitet von Gernot Bühring, Eva Horváth, Marina Molin-Pradel, Burkhard Reis, Bianca-Jeanette Schröder, Hans-Walter Stork. Hg. von Hans-Walter Stork (Verein für katholische Kirchengeschichte in Hamburg und Schleswig-Holstein. Beiträge und Mitteilungen Bd. 9). Husum 2008.
        >

        Thanks, Christoph - I guess at least for me you just pointed out (yet another) Bildungsloch, as I had not been aware of his work. A couple of his editions are actually scanned in online, including a later 18th century edition of Porphyry's Cave of the Nymphs reprinting, it claims, Holstenius' edition and translation into Latin. Here his rendering into Latin hexameters of the famous verses of Homer:

        Stat ramis diffusa in portus vertice oliva:
        Quam propter jucundum antrum obscurumque recedit,
        Sacra domus Nymphis, quae Naiades indigitantur.
        Intus crateres, patulaeque ex marmore vivo
        Amphorae; apes dulci qua ponunt mella susurro.
        Saxea sunt intus quoque stamina longa, ubi Nynphae
        Purpureas texunt telas, mirabile visu.
        Intus perpetui latices. Sed ianua duplex:
        Haec boream spectans homines admittit: at illa
        Respiciens austrum divinior, invia prorsus
        Est homini, praebetque viam immortalibus unis.

        I like that, especially "apes dulci qua ponunt mella susurro". Virgilian, no? "Purpureas texunt telas, mirabile visu.
        Intus perpetui latices. Sed ianua duplex". Nice, I think. I like "latices" there for "hydata". I looked it up in Lewis and Short and appears of Lethe in Virgil and something similar in Lucretius. And that lovely word "susurrus" - actually already in Propertius but also famously at the beginning of Apuleius' Golden Ass.

        To say nothing of all that alliteration in "Saxea sunt intus quoque stamina longa." Is that more buzzing of the beezz? :)

        Dennis Clark
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