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Re: [neoplatonism] Plato/Hegel/Emerson philosophical mysticism: website and blog

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  • Robert Wallace
    Dear Dr Mether, You ve outlined a fascinating and important domain for discussion. Have you considered setting up such a list (or lists) yourself? Your email
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 11, 2008
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      Dear Dr Mether,

      You've outlined a fascinating and important domain for discussion.
      Have you considered setting up such a list (or lists) yourself? Your
      email and a quick google search make it clear that you have a great
      deal to share with us. Setting up a Yahoo group is not difficult. I
      would be a close listener and an occasional participant on such a list.

      Yours sincerely,
      Bob W.

      On Nov 11, 2008, at 12:16 PM, Thomas Mether wrote:

      > I think the lists where there was substantial philosophical
      > discussion have been disappearing. There used to be a good
      > neoplatonic themed list on Byzantine thought.
      > It seems to have been down now for years. There was an Orthodox and
      > Catholic
      > philosophy list that is now gone. And there was a need for lists
      > that never existed.
      > I'm a comparative medievalist (Indian, Muslim, Byzantine, Latin) but
      > am unaware of any lists with substantive discussion in comparative
      > terms and there should be one. For
      > example, the problem of individuation is fascinating when looked at
      > in terms of how it
      > was handled in the above-mentioned traditions. One Muslim thinker's
      > treatment of it bears comparison to that of Royce. Time is another
      > topic. Generally, while time seems to be regarded as a bad or
      > inferior thing, beginning with the Greeks, and thus, you end up with
      > some of the problems/paradoxes in divine knowledge and eternity vis
      > a vis time, time
      > is a divine attribute in the east. A third topic: three of the above-
      > mentioned traditions
      > read Aristotle's Posterior Analytics as a treatise in mystical
      > theology on the perfection of the intellect. The perfection of
      > intellectual apprehension and reasoning in these traditions share
      > interesting parallels to the Buddhist meditative culture of
      > stabilizing concentrative absorption and analytical insight. So, if
      > you find such a list, let me know.
      >
      > --- On Tue, 11/11/08, Robert Wallace <bob@...> wrote:
      >
      > From: Robert Wallace <bob@...>
      > Subject: [neoplatonism] Plato/Hegel/Emerson philosophical mysticism:
      > website and blog
      > To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Tuesday, November 11, 2008, 11:43 AM
      >
      > Hello,
      >
      > I hope that many of you will be interested in my new website and blog
      > on Plato/Hegel/Emerson Philosophical Mysticism/The God of Freedom.
      > It's at http://www.robertmwallace.com
      >
      > As you may know from my occasional postings on this list, I consider
      > Hegel one of the most important modern representatives of the
      > (broadly) Platonic tradition in philosophy. One way Hegel situates
      > himself in the Platonic tradition is by continuing the Platonic
      > practice of connecting philosophy to religion and to mysticism. Only a
      > minority of modern philosophers are aware of the possibility of this
      > kind of connection, and of its depth and importance. Much of my work
      > is directed at clarifying this connection, in such a way that (I hope)
      > people with little or no background in philosophy will be able to get
      > an idea of how this connection can contribute to our lives. How good
      > philosophy (the intellect) can contribute to our spiritual lives, and
      > how our spiritual lives can contribute to our intellectual lives
      > (philosophy). Not to mention poetry, which often has feet in all of
      > these domains.
      >
      > My one-page "Manifesto for Philosophical Mysticism"
      > (http://www.robertmwallace.com/Site/Manifesto.html
      > ), on the website, outlines what I take to be some of Plato's and
      > Hegel's most central ideas. It offers (in effect) a brief summary of
      > the interpretation of Hegel that I developed at length in my Hegel's
      > Philosophy of Reality, Freedom, and God (Cambridge U. Press, 2005),
      > which Professor Peter Steinberger of Reed College, writing in The
      > Review of Metaphysics, called “a terrific book
      > a highly important
      > contribution.” I believe that the Plato who wrote the Republic,
      > Symposium, and Timaeus is substantially in agreement with Hegel on
      > these issues. (I have written four chapters on Plato in my unpublished
      > The God of Love, Science, and Inner Freedom.)
      >
      > Incidentally, it seems clear to me that Plotinus and his successors
      > agree with Plato and Hegel on the fundamental issues that I focus on
      > in these texts. Hegel clearly learned a lot from the Neoplatonic
      > tradition as well as from Plato himself. For simplicity of exposition,
      > I've omitted Plotinus and co. from most of my discussions, but
      > interpolating him and his characteristic terminology and influence
      > would obviously help to fill out the story and to explain aspects of
      > the tradition that my interpretation doesn't directly address.
      >
      > My website also includes:
      >
      > 1. A guide to Internet Resources on Philosophical Mysticism, which is
      > also a introductory essay on God, transcendence, Plato and Hegel. This
      > essay provides the most substantial discussion of Plato's texts that I
      > give on the site.
      >
      > 2. A section of my writings that you can download (including chapters
      > from my Hegel's Philosophy of Reality, Freedom, and God and from my
      > The God of Love, Science, and Inner Freedom, and a sermon on Emerson).
      >
      > 3. My blog, which includes short essays on What is Philosophical
      > Mysticism?; How Inner Freedom Requires Love; Wordsworth and Mary
      > Oliver; William Blake; and Marx, Nietzsche and Simon Critchley.
      >
      > Please have a look, and give me your thoughts. The blog invites
      > comments. If you know of other Internet resources (including blogs)
      > relating to philosophical mysticism that I haven't mentioned in my
      > guide, please let me know. I'm particularly eager to hear of
      > discussion lists, blogs and websites that deal with the Platonic
      > tradition and its relation to literature. Also, I'd love to hear about
      > broad-minded lists and blogs dealing with religious philosophy,
      > including Asian religious philosophy (now there's a big subject!).
      >
      > I'll be distributing this notice through other lists as well; I
      > apologize to those of you who'll get more than one notice.
      >
      > My best to all,
      > Bob
      >
      >
      > Robert M. Wallace, PhD
      > webpage: www.robertmwallace.com (Philosophical Mysticism; The God of
      > Freedom)
      > email: Bob@...
      > phone: 414-962-6934
      >
      >
      >
      >
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      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >

      Robert Wallace
      website: www.robertmwallace.com (Philosophical Mysticism; The God of
      Freedom)
      email: Bob@...
      phone: 414-962-6934
    • jensav55
      Prof. Wallace-- It s fortuitous that you posted here, as I was just thinking about e-mailing you to ask whether you d ever read an article by Stanley Rosen
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 12, 2008
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        Prof. Wallace--

        It's fortuitous that you posted here, as I was just thinking about
        e-mailing you to ask whether you'd ever read an article by Stanley
        Rosen called "Sôphrosunê and Selbstbewusstsein", Review of Metaphysics
        26.4, 1973. It's about Plato and Fichte; I think it would be right up
        your alley.

        Best wishes,
        Edward Butler
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