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RE: [neoplatonism] Please Post Message-Thanks

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  • Malcolm Schosha
    Charles William Mitchell was a Pre-Raphaelite. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_William_Mitchell The painting does not, in my view, capture to spirit of
    Message 1 of 19 , Nov 6, 2008
      Charles William Mitchell was a Pre-Raphaelite.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_William_Mitchell
      The painting does not, in my view, capture to spirit of the Hellenistic
      world, but perhaps the publishers thought to would boost sales.

      Malcolm

      ..................................

      --- On Thu, 11/6/08, Adamson, Peter <peter.adamson@...> wrote:
      From: Adamson, Peter <peter.adamson@...>
      Subject: RE: [neoplatonism] Please Post Message-Thanks
      To: "neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com" <neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: Thursday, November 6, 2008, 4:40 AM











      Hi folks,



      It's the philosopher Hypatia, painted by Charles William Mitchell (so says the back of the book).



      Cheerio.

      Peter



      peter.adamson@ kcl.ac.uk



      Philosophy Dept.

      King's College London

      Strand

      London WC2R 2LS

      UK

      ____________ _________ _________ _________ _

      From: neoplatonism@ yahoogroups. com [neoplatonism@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of John Uebersax [john.uebersax@ yahoo.com]

      Sent: Thursday, November 06, 2008 7:13 AM

      To: neoplatonism@ yahoogroups. com

      Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] Please Post Message-Thanks



      Interesting book which I will be sure to investigate further.



      But can anyone explain the significance of the rather racey cover?



      John Uebersax





























      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • vaeringjar
      ... Hellenistic ... Odd I thought I knew all the Pre-Raphaelites and representations of Hypatia, but not this one. Somehow, given her famous or infamous
      Message 2 of 19 , Nov 6, 2008
        --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, Malcolm Schosha
        <malcolmschosha@...> wrote:
        >
        > Charles William Mitchell was a Pre-Raphaelite.
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_William_Mitchell
        > The painting does not, in my view, capture to spirit of the
        Hellenistic
        > world, but perhaps the publishers thought to would boost sales.
        >
        > Malcolm
        >
        > ..................................

        Odd I thought I knew all the Pre-Raphaelites and representations of
        Hypatia, but not this one. Somehow, given her famous or infamous
        comment to one of her admirers who fancied her, I don't think she
        would be amused by this portrait at all.

        Now that this subject has come up, does anyone have any opinions of
        this (relatively) new biography of Hypatia by Michael Deakin? Here's
        a link to it at Barnes and Noble:

        http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Hypatia-of-Alexandria/Michael-A-B-
        Deakin/e/9781591025207/?itm=5

        Dennis Clark
      • vaeringjar
        ... Hellenistic ... Forget the biography and just wait for the major motion picture! Apparently a film, , is being made now about Hypatia. Why it would
        Message 3 of 19 , Nov 6, 2008
          --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, Malcolm Schosha
          <malcolmschosha@...> wrote:
          >
          > Charles William Mitchell was a Pre-Raphaelite.
          > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_William_Mitchell
          > The painting does not, in my view, capture to spirit of the
          Hellenistic
          > world, but perhaps the publishers thought to would boost sales.
          >
          > Malcolm
          >
          > ..................................
          >
          > --- On Thu, 11/6/08, Adamson, Peter <peter.adamson@...> wrote:
          > From: Adamson, Peter <peter.adamson@...>
          > Subject: RE: [neoplatonism] Please Post Message-Thanks
          > To: "neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com" <neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com>
          > Date: Thursday, November 6, 2008, 4:40 AM


          Forget the biography and just wait for the major motion picture!
          Apparently a film, <Agora>, is being made now about Hypatia. Why it
          would be called that escapes me. Here is the synopsis from IMDB:

          "A historical drama set in Roman Egypt, concerning a slave who turns
          to the rising tide of Christianity in the hopes of pursuing freedom
          while also falling in love with his master, the famous female
          philosophy professor and atheist Hypatia of Alexandria."

          http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1186830/

          And Synesius is listed as a character, no less, as are Orestes and
          Cyril. Rachel Weisz is portraying Hypatia, and the late Anthony
          Minghella's son plays the above-mentioned slave. Most curious.

          And this from the film blog at the Guardian in the UK from March of
          this year:

          'Filming is to start this week on Agora, Alejandro Amenábar's next
          English-language film after The Others. As a Classics spod, I never
          imagined in my wildest dreams that Hollywood would make a film set in
          the ancient library of Alexandria but, as Sophocles would say, polla
          ta deina (or, roughly translated, wonders never cease).

          According to Amenábar, "It's amazing to think that [ancient
          Alexandria] should be condemned to oblivion, not least by filmmakers.
          Our entire team is devoted to bringing ancient Alexandria back to
          life by using a hyper-realist approach. We want the audience to see,
          feel and smell a remote civilization as if it were as real as the
          present day."'

          http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2008/mar/17/bloodonthescrollsa
          lexandri

          I guess also they are putting her in defence of the Library. That
          may not be so accurate, since it likely by her period had fallen on
          hard times, if not already been totaly destroyed. According to
          another little blurb I found online, the director is also the writer,
          and it's being shot on Malta.

          Will this be the first time a Neoplatonist, or two I suppose if you
          count her and Synesius, has been on film?

          Does this mean we should we expect the life story of Proclus on the
          big screen any time soon?

          Dennis Clark
        • John Uebersax
          ... Here s ... I ve not seen this book yet (thanks for mentioning it) but I did read the biography of Hypatia by Maria Dzielska:
          Message 4 of 19 , Nov 6, 2008
            --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, "vaeringjar" <vaeringjar@...>
            wrote:

            > Odd I thought I knew all the Pre-Raphaelites and representations of
            > Hypatia, but not this one. Somehow, given her famous or infamous
            > comment to one of her admirers who fancied her, I don't think she
            > would be amused by this portrait at all.
            >
            > Now that this subject has come up, does anyone have any opinions of
            > this (relatively) new biography of Hypatia by Michael Deakin?
            Here's
            > a link to it at Barnes and Noble:
            >
            > http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Hypatia-of-Alexandria/Michael-A-B-
            > Deakin/e/9781591025207/?itm=5

            I've not seen this book yet (thanks for mentioning it) but I did read
            the biography of Hypatia by Maria Dzielska:

            http://www.amazon.com/Hypatia-Alexandria-Revealing-Antiquity-
            Dzielska/dp/0674437764/

            The editorial review of the Deakins book says: "Her life ended
            tragically in violence at the hands of a rampaging mob of Christian
            fanatics, who killed her for her 'pagan' beliefs" -- which is of
            course the popular view (epitomized by the portrayal of Edward
            Gibbon).

            It seems implausible to me that Hypatia would have been killed merely
            for "pagan beliefs." First, from the Dzielska book, it seems that
            there was a serious political struggle going on in which Hypatia was
            centrally involved', and a political motive seems more likely.

            Further, it seems implausible that an accusation merely of pagan
            beliefs would incite a mob action; I seem to recall in the Dzielska
            book that the accusations more concerned specific charges of
            witchcraft -- alleged magical activities which intentionally produced
            certain evils that befell the Alexandarians (or the Christian
            community).

            John Uebersax
          • John Dilon
            ... She was a serious bluestocking, and far too politically influential to suit the Patriarch Cyril. JMD [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 19 , Nov 7, 2008
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com <mailto:neoplatonism%40yahoogroups.com> ,
              > "vaeringjar" <vaeringjar@...>
              > wrote:
              >
              >> > Odd I thought I knew all the Pre-Raphaelites and representations of
              >> > Hypatia, but not this one. Somehow, given her famous or infamous
              >> > comment to one of her admirers who fancied her, I don't think she
              >> > would be amused by this portrait at all.
              >> >
              >> > Now that this subject has come up, does anyone have any opinions of
              >> > this (relatively) new biography of Hypatia by Michael Deakin?
              > Here's
              >> > a link to it at Barnes and Noble:
              >> >
              >> > http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Hypatia-of-Alexandria/Michael-A-B-
              >> > Deakin/e/9781591025207/?itm=5
              >
              > I've not seen this book yet (thanks for mentioning it) but I did read
              > the biography of Hypatia by Maria Dzielska:
              >
              > http://www.amazon.com/Hypatia-Alexandria-Revealing-Antiquity-
              > Dzielska/dp/0674437764/
              >
              > The editorial review of the Deakins book says: "Her life ended
              > tragically in violence at the hands of a rampaging mob of Christian
              > fanatics, who killed her for her 'pagan' beliefs" -- which is of
              > course the popular view (epitomized by the portrayal of Edward
              > Gibbon).
              >
              > It seems implausible to me that Hypatia would have been killed merely
              > for "pagan beliefs." First, from the Dzielska book, it seems that
              > there was a serious political struggle going on in which Hypatia was
              > centrally involved', and a political motive seems more likely.
              >
              > Further, it seems implausible that an accusation merely of pagan
              > beliefs would incite a mob action; I seem to recall in the Dzielska
              > book that the accusations more concerned specific charges of
              > witchcraft -- alleged magical activities which intentionally produced
              > certain evils that befell the Alexandarians (or the Christian
              > community).
              >
              > John Uebersax
              >
              >
              >

              She was a serious bluestocking, and far too politically influential to suit
              the Patriarch Cyril. JMD


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • vaeringjar
              ... read ... I found a review of it online, by a mathematics professor, and the author of the new biography is himself a mathematician, but it is still a
              Message 6 of 19 , Nov 7, 2008
                > I've not seen this book yet (thanks for mentioning it) but I did
                read
                > the biography of Hypatia by Maria Dzielska:
                >
                > http://www.amazon.com/Hypatia-Alexandria-Revealing-Antiquity-
                > Dzielska/dp/0674437764/

                I found a review of it online, by a mathematics professor, and the
                author of the new biography is himself a mathematician, but it is
                still a general biography. The review was not all positive -
                apparently Deakin spends a goodly amount of time analyzing theories
                of the Trinity - I haven't studied Hypatia in a long time, since I
                read Dzielska's book, but I can't for the life of me fathom why he
                would need to delve into that subject in a biography of Hypatia, and
                the reviewer furthermore faulted him for citing Augustine on the
                subject as inappropriate, too Western, for Alexandria. The new book
                does have the advantage of including all the relevant primary source
                material on Hypatia - not that that takes up too many pages, but
                always nice to have such things in one place for handy reference, I
                suppose.

                It's been ages - 10 years? - since I read Dzielska, but I vaguely
                remember being rather disappointed by it, though admittedly I don't
                remember exactly why.

                Edward Watts has a recent piece on her that I have not read yet in
                the collection <Violence in Late Antiquity>, and he discusses her in
                his <City and School> book. Parts of the recent essay are online at
                Google books:

                http://books.google.com/books?
                id=NbYd3WXfc1cC&pg=PA333&lpg=PA333&dq=edward+watt+hypatia&source=web&o
                ts=lNL7NatqeE&sig=YqkukupQYm1aTS-
                axUxQLA4mNJI&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=1&ct=result

                >
                > The editorial review of the Deakins book says: "Her life ended
                > tragically in violence at the hands of a rampaging mob of Christian
                > fanatics, who killed her for her 'pagan' beliefs" -- which is of
                > course the popular view (epitomized by the portrayal of Edward
                > Gibbon).
                >
                > It seems implausible to me that Hypatia would have been killed
                merely
                > for "pagan beliefs." First, from the Dzielska book, it seems that
                > there was a serious political struggle going on in which Hypatia
                was
                > centrally involved', and a political motive seems more likely.
                >
                > Further, it seems implausible that an accusation merely of pagan
                > beliefs would incite a mob action; I seem to recall in the Dzielska
                > book that the accusations more concerned specific charges of
                > witchcraft -- alleged magical activities which intentionally
                produced
                > certain evils that befell the Alexandarians (or the Christian
                > community).
                >
                > John Uebersax
                >

                As Prof Dillon said, Cyril has the blood mostly if not all on his
                hands here, and it's mostly political, as she got caught in a
                political struggle between him and the city prefect Orestes, but I
                still have to wonder if her pagan status didn't also contribute to
                her demise, or at least to the extremely vicious nature of it, or at
                least it didn't help matters. Hard to say, perhaps unless one could
                get into the heads of the perpetrators of such hideous acts. Watts
                describes the whole affair in that new article.

                Personally I wonder how much of all that will be in the new film. I
                can imagine it not being handled all that well, but in this case one
                thing is certain: there is no need to hype the ugliness for dramatic
                effect - life itself was quite cruel enough at the end for Hypatia
                without any need for artistic license or exaggeration.

                Dennis Clark
              • Curt Steinmetz
                ... Recall that this was an era when people said, with complete sincerity, such things as There is no crime for those who have Christ. Curt Steinmetz
                Message 7 of 19 , Nov 7, 2008
                  John Uebersax wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > It seems implausible to me that Hypatia would have been killed merely
                  > for "pagan beliefs."

                  Recall that this was an era when people said, with complete sincerity,
                  such things as "There is no crime for those who have Christ."

                  Curt Steinmetz
                • vaeringjar
                  ... There I go again, muddling it - Orestes was actually the prefect of all Egypt. Dennis Clark
                  Message 8 of 19 , Nov 7, 2008
                    > As Prof Dillon said, Cyril has the blood mostly if not all on his
                    > hands here, and it's mostly political, as she got caught in a
                    > political struggle between him and the city prefect Orestes,

                    There I go again, muddling it - Orestes was actually the prefect of all
                    Egypt.

                    Dennis Clark
                  • Edward Moore
                    One should be careful not to remove that statement from the theological context in which it was uttered. Edward ... From: Curt Steinmetz To:
                    Message 9 of 19 , Nov 7, 2008
                      One should be careful not to remove that statement from the theological context in which it was uttered.

                      Edward


                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Curt Steinmetz
                      To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Friday, November 07, 2008 1:19 PM
                      Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] Re: Please Post Message-Thanks


                      John Uebersax wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > It seems implausible to me that Hypatia would have been killed merely
                      > for "pagan beliefs."

                      Recall that this was an era when people said, with complete sincerity,
                      such things as "There is no crime for those who have Christ."

                      Curt Steinmetz




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • vaeringjar
                      ... theological context in which it was uttered. ... I ll bite - what exactly was the context of the remark, and who said it? I have never heard this before,
                      Message 10 of 19 , Nov 7, 2008
                        --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, "Edward Moore" <patristics@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > One should be careful not to remove that statement from the
                        theological context in which it was uttered.
                        >
                        > Edward

                        I'll bite - what exactly was the context of the remark, and who said
                        it?

                        I have never heard this before, and I have read quite a bit on the
                        subject of the struggle between Christianity and Paganism - Twombley,
                        Chuvin, McMullen. Tried to look the quotation up online but got way
                        too many hits on a new book with that same title, on religious
                        violence in the late empire, that does sound worth reading:

                        http://www.ucpress.edu/books/pages/9582.php

                        Dennis Clark


                        >
                        >
                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > From: Curt Steinmetz
                        > To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Friday, November 07, 2008 1:19 PM
                        > Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] Re: Please Post Message-Thanks
                        >
                        >
                        > John Uebersax wrote:
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > It seems implausible to me that Hypatia would have been killed
                        merely
                        > > for "pagan beliefs."
                        >
                        > Recall that this was an era when people said, with complete
                        sincerity,
                        > such things as "There is no crime for those who have Christ."
                        >
                        > Curt Steinmetz
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                      • Edward Moore
                        St. Paul, Epistle to the Romans 8:1. Sure, there were certain Christian gnostics who thought it wise to continue sinning so that grace may abound, and
                        Message 11 of 19 , Nov 7, 2008
                          St. Paul, Epistle to the Romans 8:1.

                          Sure, there were certain Christian 'gnostics' who thought it wise to continue sinning so that "grace may abound," and others who felt that "being right with God" gave them license to do what they wished. But as Paul's remarks in this chapter make clear, such an interpretation falls *ahem* short of the mark.

                          Edward




                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: vaeringjar
                          To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Friday, November 07, 2008 2:57 PM
                          Subject: [neoplatonism] Re: Please Post Message-Thanks


                          --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, "Edward Moore" <patristics@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > One should be careful not to remove that statement from the
                          theological context in which it was uttered.
                          >
                          > Edward

                          I'll bite - what exactly was the context of the remark, and who said
                          it?

                          I have never heard this before, and I have read quite a bit on the
                          subject of the struggle between Christianity and Paganism - Twombley,
                          Chuvin, McMullen. Tried to look the quotation up online but got way
                          too many hits on a new book with that same title, on religious
                          violence in the late empire, that does sound worth reading:

                          http://www.ucpress.edu/books/pages/9582.php

                          Dennis Clark

                          >
                          >
                          > ----- Original Message -----
                          > From: Curt Steinmetz
                          > To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                          > Sent: Friday, November 07, 2008 1:19 PM
                          > Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] Re: Please Post Message-Thanks
                          >
                          >
                          > John Uebersax wrote:
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > It seems implausible to me that Hypatia would have been killed
                          merely
                          > > for "pagan beliefs."
                          >
                          > Recall that this was an era when people said, with complete
                          sincerity,
                          > such things as "There is no crime for those who have Christ."
                          >
                          > Curt Steinmetz
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >





                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Curt Steinmetz
                          The book is definitely worth reading - and it s currently on sale! However, the focus is primarily on inter-Christian violence - with less attention to
                          Message 12 of 19 , Nov 7, 2008
                            The book is definitely worth reading - and it's currently on sale!
                            However, the focus is primarily on inter-Christian violence - with less
                            attention to conflicts between Christians and Pagans.

                            The book does provide the backstory for the quote - as follows:

                            "In the early fifth century, the Egyptian monk Shenoute isssued an open
                            letter containing a thundering denunciation of a local pagan magnate.
                            Shenoute and his followers had taken the law into their own hands,
                            ransacked the pagan's house, and smashed his idols. In response to the
                            magnate's accusation of lesteia - banditry, crime, illegal violence -
                            against him, Shenoute proclaimed that 'there is no crime for those who
                            have Christ.'"

                            Curt

                            P.S. See the University of California Press website for sale prices on
                            books - sale ends TODAY, btw.

                            vaeringjar wrote:
                            > --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, "Edward Moore" <patristics@...>
                            > wrote:
                            >
                            >> One should be careful not to remove that statement from the
                            >>
                            > theological context in which it was uttered.
                            >
                            >> Edward
                            >>
                            >
                            > I'll bite - what exactly was the context of the remark, and who said
                            > it?
                            >
                            > I have never heard this before, and I have read quite a bit on the
                            > subject of the struggle between Christianity and Paganism - Twombley,
                            > Chuvin, McMullen. Tried to look the quotation up online but got way
                            > too many hits on a new book with that same title, on religious
                            > violence in the late empire, that does sound worth reading:
                            >
                            > http://www.ucpress.edu/books/pages/9582.php
                            >
                            > Dennis Clark
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >> ----- Original Message -----
                            >> From: Curt Steinmetz
                            >> To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
                            >> Sent: Friday, November 07, 2008 1:19 PM
                            >> Subject: Re: [neoplatonism] Re: Please Post Message-Thanks
                            >>
                            >>
                            >> John Uebersax wrote:
                            >> >
                            >> >
                            >> > It seems implausible to me that Hypatia would have been killed
                            >>
                            > merely
                            >
                            >> > for "pagan beliefs."
                            >>
                            >> Recall that this was an era when people said, with complete
                            >>
                            > sincerity,
                            >
                            >> such things as "There is no crime for those who have Christ."
                            >>
                            >> Curt Steinmetz
                            >>
                            >>
                            >>
                            >>
                            >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >>
                            >>
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > ------------------------------------
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                          • Bradley Skene
                            One dimension of Cyril s conflict with the emperor (the larger framework of Hypatia s murder) was the fact that he (Cyril) was monophysite. One source claims
                            Message 13 of 19 , Nov 7, 2008
                              One dimension of Cyril's conflict with the emperor (the larger framework of
                              Hypatia's murder) was the fact that he (Cyril) was monophysite.
                              One source claims Cyril decided to have her killed when he grew jealous of
                              the fact that she was admitted ot Orestes' salutatio every morning, even
                              though she was a 'pagan,' while he, as a heretic was excluded.

                              Cheers,

                              Bradley A. Skene

                              On Fri, Nov 7, 2008 at 12:13 PM, vaeringjar <vaeringjar@...> wrote:

                              > ...
                              > apparently Deakin spends a goodly amount of time analyzing theories
                              > of the Trinity - I haven't studied Hypatia in a long time, since I
                              > read Dzielska's book, but I can't for the life of me fathom why he
                              > would need to delve into that subject in a biography of Hypatia,...
                              >


                              >
                              > Personally I wonder how much of all that will be in the new film. ...
                              >
                              > Dennis Clark
                              >


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Christoph Helmig
                              Dear all, just a word on Deakin s new book on Hypatia. It includes a short section on the trinity (pp. 39-41, in the chapter The Religious Background ), but
                              Message 14 of 19 , Nov 8, 2008
                                Dear all,

                                just a word on Deakin's new book on Hypatia. It includes a short
                                section on the trinity (pp. 39-41, in the chapter "The Religious
                                Background"), but the author is more interested in Hypatia's studies
                                of mathematics and astronomy (pp. 87-113 plus an appendix
                                "Mathematical Details", pp.115-126). Deakin's study contains extensive
                                notes (pp. 161-213) and a translation of the primary sources on
                                Hypatia that came down to us (pp. 137-159; these translations are
                                mostly based on Migne and I haven't checked them yet; see also Ian
                                Mueller, "Hypatia", in: Grinstein/Campbell, Women of Mathematics,
                                Westport 1987, 74-79 which Deakin calls "the best accessible summary
                                of all"). Moreover, there is an index and a useful annotated
                                bibliography (not always up to date, but very good for older studies,
                                before 1900). Strangely enough, Deakin is using Migne for most (not
                                all) authors quoted, but then, again, the author is probably more of a
                                mathematician with an interest in the history of science.

                                See also: http://wwmat.mat.fc.ul.pt/~jnsilva/Sherlock/hypatia2.pdf

                                I find it very difficult to judge the overall quality of Deakin's
                                book, but it is certainly very different from other 'Hypatian folklore'.

                                Best,
                                Christoph

                                Disclaimer: http://www.kuleuven.be/cwis/email_disclaimer.htm
                              • John Uebersax
                                In this article, found online, Deakin summarizes the primary sources on Hypatia: The Primary Sources for the Life and Work of Hypatia of Alexandria
                                Message 15 of 19 , Nov 10, 2008
                                  In this article, found online, Deakin summarizes the primary sources
                                  on Hypatia:

                                  The Primary Sources for the Life and Work of Hypatia of Alexandria
                                  http://www.polyamory.org/~howard/Hypatia/primary-sources.html

                                  Some online English translations of the material are as follows:

                                  The Life of Hypatia
                                  Damascius's Life of Isidore, reproduced in The Suda
                                  Translated by Jeremiah Reedy
                                  http://cosmopolis.com/alexandria/hypatia-bio-suda.htmlFrom

                                  The Life of Hypatia, Socrates Scholasticus, from his Ecclesiastical
                                  History
                                  http://www.cosmopolis.com/alexandria/hypatia-bio-socrates.html

                                  (but, as the Deakin article above notes, surrounding sections of
                                  Socrates are also useful to describe the historical context)

                                  The Life of Hypatia, John, Bishop of Nikiu, from his Chronicle 84.87-103
                                  http://www.cosmopolis.com/alexandria/hypatia-bio-john.html

                                  Also this page contains links to quite a bit of information:

                                  http://www.polyamory.org/~howard/Hypatia/index.html

                                  John Uebersax
                                • vaeringjar
                                  ... Nice to have all these references pulled together - I just wish, as Christoph said, that more recent editions rather than the PG had been cited - one that
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Nov 10, 2008
                                    --- In neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com, "John Uebersax"
                                    <john.uebersax@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > In this article, found online, Deakin summarizes the primary sources
                                    > on Hypatia:
                                    >
                                    > The Primary Sources for the Life and Work of Hypatia of Alexandria
                                    > http://www.polyamory.org/~howard/Hypatia/primary-sources.html
                                    >

                                    Nice to have all these references pulled together - I just wish, as
                                    Christoph said, that more recent editions rather than the PG had been
                                    cited - one that jumps out is the Letters of Synesius. There is a new
                                    edition from Belles Lettres in 2000 now, a two volume Bude. That's
                                    mostly a matter of just substituting where possible.

                                    Dennis Clark
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