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Re: Hierocles and the Demiurge

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  • Melanie B. Mineo
    Of course, it is easy to fall into the trap of facile esotericism here (to which Livio s book is a good antidote, debunking the legends that the Golden Ratio
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 17, 2006
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      "Of course, it is easy to fall into the trap of facile esotericism here
      (to which Livio's book is a good antidote, debunking the legends that
      the Golden Ratio underlies the construction of the Parthenon and the
      Egyptian pyramids). Yet there's almost certainly *something* here, and
      I wouldn't be at all surprised if the Golden Ratio did play a role in
      Late Platonic - Early Academic thought, and therefore probably
      Pythagorean thought as well. If not, does anyone know of a better
      explanation of the Divided Line?"

      ***

      Les, does your work take this issue into account? What do you think of
      what Mike has said here? (See new forum for the entire message...I've
      posted this there as well...) M
    • leslie greenhill
      Hi Melanie (I tried sending this to you via Neoplatonic Studies but it didn t seem to work. Hopefully you will receive this as a neoplatonism posting.)
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 17, 2006
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        Hi Melanie

        (I tried sending this to you via Neoplatonic Studies
        but it didn't seem to work. Hopefully you will receive
        this as a neoplatonism posting.)
        ..............

        There has been quite a bit of study in relation to the
        golden ratio, the Parthenon and the pyramids. I am of
        the view that it does not appear in any of these
        structures. The ratio that has stimulated discussion
        in the design of the Great Pyramid is 22:7, the
        well-known ratio used to represent pi. It also
        appears in the design of the collapsed pyramid at
        Meydum. Many historians are now of the view that the
        22:7 proportion was in the ancient Egyptian
        mathematical repertoire. In the case of the Parthenon
        the only ratio recognised by authorities on the
        structure's design is the 9:4 (225:100)ratio. I'm
        glad you raised this matter because the 225:100 ratio
        is a key feature of a new work I have just completed:

        GRAND DESIGN IN THE WORKS OF LEONARDO, VITRUVIUS,
        PLATO AND HERODOTUS

        ABSTRACT: Leonardo da Vinci’s image of Vitruvian Man,
        man the microcosm, is the most famous illustration of
        its kind. Da Vinci’s layout of man’s body in a square
        and a circle is derived from a formulation found in
        the influential treatise “The Ten Books on
        Architecture” written some two thousand years ago by
        the Roman architect and engineer Vitruvius. It is
        demonstrated that certain critical design elements in
        the body’s layout can be linked to other historically
        significant designs found in Vitruvius’s treatise, in
        the famous layout of Atlantis as described in
        “Critias” by the Greek philosopher Plato, and in a
        number of inventive formulations in a renowned
        classical work “The Histories” by Herodotus. The
        material in this exposition radically changes notions
        of design, the nature of Greek and Roman measures, and
        the influence of Pythagoreanism in antiquity. (7000
        words)

        Over the next couple of days I will put together some
        examples from the work and post it for you and others
        to digest.

        As to the divided line I think the golden ratio is
        being referred to - given the pentagram as a
        Pythagorean symbol (and see my Atlantis paper).
        However, my work on the 3:4:5 triangle has unveiled
        some pretty remarkable outcomes, so I have an open
        mind on the matter.

        I have a short paper (as yet unpublished) which
        provides an unusual view of the 3:4:5 triangle when it
        is treated in a particular way. Only basic geometry
        and basic arithmetic are involved. I will email the
        paper as an attachment to anyone interested. For
        reasons that would take too long to explain, I think
        Plato and others were very interested in Pythagorean
        triples (right triangles with whole number sides,
        e.g., 3:4:5, 5:12:13, 7:24:25).

        Cheers
        Les


        --- "Melanie B. Mineo" <melonyfelony@...> wrote:

        > "Of course, it is easy to fall into the trap of
        > facile esotericism here
        > (to which Livio's book is a good antidote, debunking
        > the legends that
        > the Golden Ratio underlies the construction of the
        > Parthenon and the
        > Egyptian pyramids). Yet there's almost certainly
        > *something* here, and
        > I wouldn't be at all surprised if the Golden Ratio
        > did play a role in
        > Late Platonic - Early Academic thought, and
        > therefore probably
        > Pythagorean thought as well. If not, does anyone
        > know of a better
        > explanation of the Divided Line?"
        >
        > ***
        >
        > Les, does your work take this issue into account?
        > What do you think of
        > what Mike has said here? (See new forum for the
        > entire message...I've
        > posted this there as well...) M
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


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