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5165Re: Re : [neoplatonism] Question on Biology or it's history

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  • Thomas Mether
    Dec 2, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Marco,
      I received a bunch of replies. They are mainly sources. I'm compiling them in a list (hopefully roughly alphabetical) but that will probably be next Monday or Tuesday. I'm knee deep in grading and don't want it to get higher but it will as end of term comes next week. Look for their recommendations around then.
      Thomas

      From: Thomas Mether <t_mether@...>
      To: "neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com" <neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 10:01 AM
      Subject: Re: Re : [neoplatonism] Question on Biology or it's history


       
      Marco,
       
      PS. I got a little bit more in my other email address. Another respondent said Basil's hospital was also a research institution. Ever since Basil, hospitals until recently were where the poor went for treatment until Johns Hopkins became the first modern research hospital (like Basil's complex). He also said one of the areas where the Byzantines made great advances in science over their Graeco-Roman predecessors was in biology and medicine. He plans to send bibliographical info on articles on this that mention the Middle Platonic and Neoplatonic background to the study of medicine. A number of studies were done by Dumbarton Oaks.
       
      Thomas

      From: Thomas Mether <t_mether@...>
      To: "neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com" <neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 9:48 AM
      Subject: Re: Re : [neoplatonism] Question on Biology or it's history

       
      Marco,
       
      I did get one reply that does not directly answer your question about the Neoplatonists interest in medicine and biology but I was told there is a book out on the Cappadocians promotion of medical science that gives some background on philosophy, theology, and the patronage of medical science to the story of Basil the Great' construction of the Ptochoptopheion (also called the Basiliad). It is widely regarded as the first hospital where the poor could get medical treatment, the dying were cared for (so first hospice), and economically uprooted poor were given job re-training. Thus, he is the patron saint of hospitals and hospital administrators. I'm waiting for the book's bibliographical information. The person that replied said there is quite a lot of new stuff out on Proclus' involvement with the sciences including biology and medical arts.
       
      I'll post more as I get it later.
       
      Thomas  

      From: Marco Bormann <marcobormann@...>
      To: "neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com" <neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 3:38 AM
      Subject: Re : [neoplatonism] Question on Biology or it's history

       
      of course you have such permisson, Thomas
      thanks

      >________________________________
      > De : Thomas Mether <t_mether@...>
      >À : "neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com" <neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com>
      >Envoyé le : Mercredi 30 Novembre 2011 22h10
      >Objet : Re: [neoplatonism] Question on Biology or it's history
      >
      >
      >

      >
      >With your permission, I can forward your query to a closed list of specialists in Byzantine theology, philosophy, and science. It is comprised of historians, scientists, theologians, philosophers.
      >
      >From: Marco <marcobormann@...>
      >To: neoplatonism@yahoogroups.com
      >Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 2:00 PM
      >Subject: [neoplatonism] Question on Biology or it's history
      >

      >In reading Gregory of Nyssa's "De opificio hominis" I am impressed by the last chapter where he does not stop at telling us that the organism is some kind of perfect system, he also tries to show in detail how all the organs depend on each other; which one is doing which job.
      >Gregory is after all no neoplatonist, at least according to my standarts. But are there any neoplatonists who bothered with such detailled biological accounts? Or is this to close to the dirty matter for them?
      >And another very special question, way off topic for any neoplatonist, but someone of you learned people in ancient texts might still know it: is Gregory's detailled account due to some known ancient specialist on the topic like Galen of example?
      >
      >Thanks a lot
      >Marco
      >
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