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[nelalist] RE: Re: Eastsider LA: Cedillo opposes landmark nomination for ...

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  • jvegatrio
    This is an interesting conversation. I usually lean towards preservation and I like the facade of the Superior market, but if the owner wants to improve it,
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 11, 2013
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      This is an interesting conversation.  I usually lean towards preservation and I like the facade of the Superior market, but if the owner wants to improve it, I guess that's OK too.  What people forget is that markets are in business to make money, and that margins are pretty slim, which is the main reason you can find dozens of flavors of Tampico and junky candy in a store like Superior, and no radicchio, for instance.  Let's face it, in NELA "caucasians" are a "minority", and it cracks me up how much people don't like the way it feels...
       
      Food 4 Less and Superior have begun stocking things like pre-packaged salads and fresh herbs that weren't there a year ago, and even though they still sell "bollillos", at least Superior is baking fresh French bread that, while not as good as Von's, ain't bad at all.  Big Saver is in more "ethnic" areas (read: not as many "caucasians"), so they haven't changed as much; perhaps they won't.
       
      There used to be a Trader Joe's in Highland Park on Ave. 64 just north of York, but they closed it because it kept getting robbed.  (At least they tried.)  I think "you" don't get the point: what you call a "healthy food store" sounds more to me like expensive wine & cheese and those other "food trinkets" that stores like TJ stock.  There's plenty of fresh fruit and produce in our local markets, and it's priced way cheaper than Von's or Trader Joes, too.  It doesn't get "healthier" than that.
       
      I don't disagree with Cedillo, either; unless you're after tacos or pupusas, a lot of our neighborhood is a "food desert", mostly because outside of the people who live in Mt. WA (and do their food shopping in Eagle Rock or So. Pas.), the rest of the demographic doesn't support a wide variety of dining choices.  A French restaurant (more a creperie, really) recently opened on Fig, and we'll see how long Ba sticks around, but those are exceptions rather than the rule.  If you look at it realistically, it's only in the last few years that a place like Eagle Rock has seen a wider variety of restaurants open; I lived in Eagle Rock from 1982 until 2006, and it wasn't until Cafe Beaujolais opened in '98 (I think) that there was any place worth patronizing outside of Colombo's, so even in "stable" or more "upscale" places like Eagle Rock there weren't all that many eating establishments.
       
      Good thing for us here in NELA is the Gold Line.  If I'm feeling like French, I can take the train to Bistro de la Gare, or further into Old Town Pasadena, for all sorts of other stuff, or, go the opposite direction to Chinatown or downtown L.A.  Sure, it'd be great to have a couple of local eateries, and even a "healthy" (froo-froo) market, but I wouldn't bet on it, at least not for a while.
       
      Oh, and there isn't a Whole Foods in So. Pasadena; you might be thinking of Bristol Farms.
       
      Cheers,
      JV
       
      Juan Vega
       
       
      In a message dated 11/11/2013 11:31:02 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, car2532002@... writes:

      Wrong!  There is a Whole Foods in South Pasadena in addition to another one in Pasadena.   The point is look at all the healthy food stores in South Pasadena, Trader Joe's, Whole Foods, Bristol Farms, Vons and Pavillions.   And all of them within a two mile area.    I guess you don't get the point.   This area needs better grocery stores and more healthy food stores.    This is what the community cried out for in Councilmember Gil Cedillo's listening tour.  He listened.   

       

       

    • Joe Walker
      There is no truth to the oft told rumor that Trader Joes in Highland Park closed because it kept getting robbed. The Hi Ho Market has thrived there for 30 plus
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 11, 2013
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        There is no truth to the oft told rumor that Trader Joes in Highland Park closed because it kept getting robbed. The Hi Ho Market has thrived there for 30 plus years and is more reflective of what the immediate area supports.
         
        Joe

        From: "JVegaTrio@..." <JVegaTrio@...>
        To: nelalist@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, November 11, 2013 11:58 AM
        Subject: [nelalist] RE: Re: Eastsider LA: Cedillo opposes landmark nomination for ...
         
        This is an interesting conversation.  I usually lean towards preservation and I like the facade of the Superior market, but if the owner wants to improve it, I guess that's OK too.  What people forget is that markets are in business to make money, and that margins are pretty slim, which is the main reason you can find dozens of flavors of Tampico and junky candy in a store like Superior, and no radicchio, for instance.  Let's face it, in NELA "caucasians" are a "minority", and it cracks me up how much people don't like the way it feels...
         
        Food 4 Less and Superior have begun stocking things like pre-packaged salads and fresh herbs that weren't there a year ago, and even though they still sell "bollillos", at least Superior is baking fresh French bread that, while not as good as Von's, ain't bad at all.  Big Saver is in more "ethnic" areas (read: not as many "caucasians"), so they haven't changed as much; perhaps they won't.
         
        There used to be a Trader Joe's in Highland Park on Ave. 64 just north of York, but they closed it because it kept getting robbed.  (At least they tried.)  I think "you" don't get the point: what you call a "healthy food store" sounds more to me like expensive wine & cheese and those other "food trinkets" that stores like TJ stock.  There's plenty of fresh fruit and produce in our local markets, and it's priced way cheaper than Von's or Trader Joes, too.  It doesn't get "healthier" than that.
         
        I don't disagree with Cedillo, either; unless you're after tacos or pupusas, a lot of our neighborhood is a "food desert", mostly because outside of the people who live in Mt. WA (and do their food shopping in Eagle Rock or So. Pas.), the rest of the demographic doesn't support a wide variety of dining choices.  A French restaurant (more a creperie, really) recently opened on Fig, and we'll see how long Ba sticks around, but those are exceptions rather than the rule.  If you look at it realistically, it's only in the last few years that a place like Eagle Rock has seen a wider variety of restaurants open; I lived in Eagle Rock from 1982 until 2006, and it wasn't until Cafe Beaujolais opened in '98 (I think) that there was any place worth patronizing outside of Colombo's, so even in "stable" or more "upscale" places like Eagle Rock there weren't all that many eating establishments.
         
        Good thing for us here in NELA is the Gold Line.  If I'm feeling like French, I can take the train to Bistro de la Gare, or further into Old Town Pasadena, for all sorts of other stuff, or, go the opposite direction to Chinatown or downtown L.A.  Sure, it'd be great to have a couple of local eateries, and even a "healthy" (froo-froo) market, but I wouldn't bet on it, at least not for a while.
         
        Oh, and there isn't a Whole Foods in So. Pasadena; you might be thinking of Bristol Farms.
         
        Cheers,
        JV
         
        Juan Vega
         
         
        In a message dated 11/11/2013 11:31:02 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, car2532002@... writes:
        Wrong!  There is a Whole Foods in South Pasadena in addition to another one in Pasadena.   The point is look at all the healthy food stores in South Pasadena, Trader Joe's, Whole Foods, Bristol Farms, Vons and Pavillions.   And all of them within a two mile area.    I guess you don't get the point.   This area needs better grocery stores and more healthy food stores.    This is what the community cried out for in Councilmember Gil Cedillo's listening tour.  He listened.   
         
         
      • car2532002
        Juan, you are totally right on every point!! Now, just hope we can get some the current markets to provide better products. Then we can shop local.
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 12, 2013
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          Juan, you are totally right on every point!!     Now, just hope we can get some the current markets to provide better products.     Then we can shop local.

           

          Susan 



          ---In nelalist@yahoogroups.com, <JVegaTrio@...> wrote:

          This is an interesting conversation.  I usually lean towards preservation and I like the facade of the Superior market, but if the owner wants to improve it, I guess that's OK too.  What people forget is that markets are in business to make money, and that margins are pretty slim, which is the main reason you can find dozens of flavors of Tampico and junky candy in a store like Superior, and no radicchio, for instance.  Let's face it, in NELA "caucasians" are a "minority", and it cracks me up how much people don't like the way it feels...
           
          Food 4 Less and Superior have begun stocking things like pre-packaged salads and fresh herbs that weren't there a year ago, and even though they still sell "bollillos", at least Superior is baking fresh French bread that, while not as good as Von's, ain't bad at all.  Big Saver is in more "ethnic" areas (read: not as many "caucasians"), so they haven't changed as much; perhaps they won't.
           
          There used to be a Trader Joe's in Highland Park on Ave. 64 just north of York, but they closed it because it kept getting robbed.  (At least they tried.)  I think "you" don't get the point: what you call a "healthy food store" sounds more to me like expensive wine & cheese and those other "food trinkets" that stores like TJ stock.  There's plenty of fresh fruit and produce in our local markets, and it's priced way cheaper than Von's or Trader Joes, too.  It doesn't get "healthier" than that.
           
          I don't disagree with Cedillo, either; unless you're after tacos or pupusas, a lot of our neighborhood is a "food desert", mostly because outside of the people who live in Mt. WA (and do their food shopping in Eagle Rock or So. Pas.), the rest of the demographic doesn't support a wide variety of dining choices.  A French restaurant (more a creperie, really) recently opened on Fig, and we'll see how long Ba sticks around, but those are exceptions rather than the rule.  If you look at it realistically, it's only in the last few years that a place like Eagle Rock has seen a wider variety of restaurants open; I lived in Eagle Rock from 1982 until 2006, and it wasn't until Cafe Beaujolais opened in '98 (I think) that there was any place worth patronizing outside of Colombo's, so even in "stable" or more "upscale" places like Eagle Rock there weren't all that many eating establishments.
           
          Good thing for us here in NELA is the Gold Line.  If I'm feeling like French, I can take the train to Bistro de la Gare, or further into Old Town Pasadena, for all sorts of other stuff, or, go the opposite direction to Chinatown or downtown L.A.  Sure, it'd be great to have a couple of local eateries, and even a "healthy" (froo-froo) market, but I wouldn't bet on it, at least not for a while.
           
          Oh, and there isn't a Whole Foods in So. Pasadena; you might be thinking of Bristol Farms.
           
          Cheers,
          JV
           
          Juan Vega
           
           
          In a message dated 11/11/2013 11:31:02 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, car2532002@... writes:

          Wrong!  There is a Whole Foods in South Pasadena in addition to another one in Pasadena.   The point is look at all the healthy food stores in South Pasadena, Trader Joe's, Whole Foods, Bristol Farms, Vons and Pavillions.   And all of them within a two mile area.    I guess you don't get the point.   This area needs better grocery stores and more healthy food stores.    This is what the community cried out for in Councilmember Gil Cedillo's listening tour.  He listened.   

           

           

        • jvegatrio
          Joe, Point taken, thanks. Cheers, JV Juan Vega In a message dated 11/12/2013 11:00:25 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, joe_walker_2000@yahoo.com writes: There is no
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 12, 2013
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            Joe,
             
            Point taken, thanks.
             
            Cheers,
            JV
             
            Juan Vega
             
             
            In a message dated 11/12/2013 11:00:25 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, joe_walker_2000@... writes:
             

            There is no truth to the oft told rumor that Trader Joes in Highland Park closed because it kept getting robbed. The Hi Ho Market has thrived there for 30 plus years and is more reflective of what the immediate area supports.
             
            Joe

          • jvegatrio
            Susan, Thanks for the kind words. Our markets are changing as the demographics change, it just takes time... Cheers, JV Juan Vega In a message dated
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 12, 2013
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              Susan,
               
              Thanks for the kind words.  Our markets are changing as the demographics change, it just takes time...
               
              Cheers,
              JV
               
              Juan Vega
               
               
              In a message dated 11/12/2013 10:56:28 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, car2532002@... writes:

              Juan, you are totally right on every point!!     Now, just hope we can get some the current markets to provide better products.     Then we can shop local.

               

              Susan 



               
            • Alice L. Hartwell
              I can t figure out the connection between changing the facade of a store building and the contents of a store, or the number of other stores in a neighborhood.
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 12, 2013
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                I can't figure out the connection between changing the facade of a store building and the contents of a store, or the number of other stores in a neighborhood. Leave the facade alone and remodel the inside. Isn't it that simple?

                Alice


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