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Re: citrus grafting

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  • john garcia
    i usually try 2 and do it around February it helps to use a growth hormone just to kick start it . after that you can go organic , but i did not say that .
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 29, 2012
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      i usually try 2 and do it around February it helps to use a growth hormone just to kick start it . after that you can go organic , but i did not say that .

      From: rourk_us <rourkreagan@...>
      To: nelalist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, November 28, 2012 5:54 AM
      Subject: [nelalist] Re: citrus grafting

       
      Hi Marge,
      You can graft the blood orange and it should be no problem. Make sure your scion is about the same size, just a wee bit thinner than the stem you are going to graft it onto. Do about 5, since many don't take.
      The California rare fruit growers have a ton of info
      http://www.crfg.org/ and do demos too several times a year.
      -Rourk

      --- In nelalist@yahoogroups.com, Marge Piane <pennyyorke@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thank you for your reply. I have a 20 year old Valencia orange tree that produces good, yet not abundant, fruit. It has ripening oranges on it right now. I was just given a full-size Moro blood orange tree as a gift. Unfortunately, I don't have room for it in my yard. It's a young tree in a one-gallon pot. I was hoping to graft (bud) branches of the blood orange onto the Valencia tree. Is that possible, or do I need two mature trees?
      > Also, I see you're a certified arborist. Do you have a business? I have two of the city's Chinese elms out front, and they sure need trimming!
      > Thank you,
      > Marge
      > P.S. I live in Glassell Park
      >



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