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Re: Highland Park Parking Woes

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  • chimatli
    What about renters and others who have no access to garages or driveways? Should they be forced to give up their cars? And as for the other person who finds it
    Message 1 of 25 , Sep 1, 2006
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      What about renters and others who have no access to garages or
      driveways? Should they be forced to give up their cars?
      And as for the other person who finds it more safe to walk around San
      Francisco at night, I totally disagree. Highland Park and Lincoln
      Heights are much calmer places (with the exception of the occasional
      shooting) than the streets of SF.
      On street cleaning days, I sometimes have to park 2-3 blocks away from
      my house. It's really not a big deal and with the exception of one
      cranky old homeowner, no one in my neighborhood seems to fret so much
      about the crowded parking situation.
      -ch


      --- In nelalist@yahoogroups.com, "ligrv" <ligrv@...> wrote:
      >
      > When I lived in South Pasadena, If you parked your car on the street
      > and didn't buy a monthly or daily parking permit to park at night, you
      > got a $25.00 ticket in the morning. Apparently South Pasadena was
      > being plagued with illegally dumped stolen cars and car break-ins.
      > Once they started charging to park in the streets, people started to
      > park all their cars in their driveways and garages. I know, South
      > Pasadena is a small city, but I think the real issue here is that DOT
      > is not enforcing the parking laws. You call the abandoned hot line to
      > report a car that been parked over 72 hours and they don't come to
      > cite the car. Or they cite the car and don't return to pick it up.
      > Trying calling when someone's blocked your driveway and you can't get
      > out or parked in the red. What DOT is creating is visual blight in our
      > neighborhoods. They are wasting our tax dollars by not enforcing the
      > law and not bringing in any revenue into the city budget by not
      > ticketing and fining these law breakers.
      >
      > As far as perferential parking permits, it not as easy as you think,
      > there are quidelines you neighborhood must fall under, some times they
      > require 10 blocks to sign up. Call and ask to speak to an Inspector,
      > they have all the rules and regulations.
      >
      > Good Luck!
      > Laura Gutierrez
      > Glassell Park
      >
      >
      > --- In nelalist@yahoogroups.com, "rourk_us" <gestalted@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I called up DOT today, they call permit parking perferential
      > > parking. They have a direct number for this 213-485-0711. I asked
      > > for an info kit. As soon as i get it I will share the info, but u
      > > might want to call them for your streets as well.-Rourk
      > >
      > > --- In nelalist@yahoogroups.com, erika gallo <erikaga11o@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Not everything can be regulated, and that's a good thing. But we
      > > do have the right to request permit parking if residents are in
      > > consensus. I do think, though, that with the implementation of the
      > > 72-hour stationary vehicle regulation we will be able to solve a lot
      > > of our parking woes. Someone out there obviously understands the
      > > problem we're facing.
      > > >
      > > > Just this morning I saw a man walking down the street carrying a
      > > garment bag as though he was going on a business trip. I thought,
      > > why is he walking down the street with a garment bag? He was walking
      > > to his car that was parked at the very end of the block. It doesn't
      > > sound far, but this block was the odd side 2800 block of Workman
      > > Ave...the equivalent of two blocks. There's a problem when you're
      > > driving home from work thinking, oh I hope I can find parking in
      > > front of my home, rather than, thank goodness my work day is over and
      > > I can get home and rest.
      > > >
      > > > Erika Gallo
      > > >
      > > > Monica Flowers <pflagmom2001@> wrote:
      > > > No, Joe, I agree that you cannot regulate how many
      > > > cars a person can own. I do not live in the Union of
      > > > Soviet Socialist Republics, as you accused Erika Gallo
      > > > of earlier this week. But I would think that if
      > > > neighbors have up to four or five cars each and refuse
      > > > to use their garages, that when the block loses up to
      > > > 30 - 40 parking spaces due to a retaining wall
      > > > collapse or construction of unwanted housing, that
      > > > they would do a little "sharing" and be a little more
      > > > courteous of their neighbors -- and allow people to
      > > > park in front of their own house once in a while.
      > > > That is not Communist ideology, just common courtesy.
      > > > But I guess that does not exist in Montecito Heights
      > > > anymore. I guess I'm just old-fashioned, not a
      > > > Commie.
      > > >
      > > > Monica
      > > >
      > > > --- Joe Walker wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > Abandoned cars should be cited and towed away...but
      > > > > how does anyone regulate how many cars a person can
      > > > > have or how many people can live in a house??
      > > > >
      > > > > Joe
      > > > >
      > > > > Monica Flowers
      > > > wrote:
      > > > > Joe, I think what Erika wrote about is
      > > > > similar to the
      > > > > immense parking problem in Montecito Heights. Many
      > > > > households have up to four cars each
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Rosie
      When I rented some years back in north Pasadena, I resented the overnight parking ban that made me have to drive down a dark alley, get out of the car and
      Message 2 of 25 , Sep 1, 2006
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        When I rented some years back in north Pasadena, I resented the overnight
        parking ban that made me have to drive down a dark alley, get out of the car
        and manually unlock the garage door even if I returned late at night--or get
        a ticket. I resented the (then) annual limit on street parking permits, or
        the fact that if I had unplanned guests they would face tickets if they
        parked on the street overnight. That was how it was some years back; things
        may well have changed for the better in the interim.

        I appreciate that street parking can be a real pain for some people in some
        neighborhoods, and I am not sure what the best solution is, but this seemed
        an unreasonable and unfair infringement on my liberties.

        RM
      • ChasInman@aol.com
        Every adult owns, on average, one vehicle in Nela. Consider the following: PennySaver runs about 20 ads a week seeking to sublease rooms for rent inside
        Message 3 of 25 , Sep 1, 2006
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          Every adult owns, on average, one vehicle in Nela.

          Consider the following:

          PennySaver runs about 20 ads a week seeking to sublease
          rooms for rent inside existing apartments.
          I once heard of renting floor space in Orange County for $150 per month.

          Bootleg rentals exist without corresponding parking requirements
          being met.

          Basements are converted to rentals without code inspections
          to check for smoke detectors, adequate egress, lighting, etc.

          A city code inspector told me he rejects bunkbeds in utility rooms
          every day.

          One possible source of bootleg rentals might be properties
          built on downslope. The underpinnings could provide space
          for more rooms. The tip-off could be only one electric meter
          but two mailboxes. Sometimes the excess mailboxes are
          concealed from the street. Only the mailman knows the truth.
          Maybe the mail is split-up later from one common mailbox.

          Only the city inspector can order an additional meter.

          Upslope properties could have another problem.
          If the back property line has a high retaining wall.
          And then a building is constructed using the retaining wall as
          one of the four walls of the building lean-to fashion,
          and people live in there, there could be a disaster.
          This wall would have high lateral pressure with no weepholes.

          With rental control, tenants have leases in perpetuity.
          Children might stay put and buy cars later.
          I have one over 29 years and the 3 kids are still there.

          Some of these things I described could be obvious to adjacent
          property owners who are reluctant to squeal on their neighbors.

          The 72 hour law is an old law but I am hearing talk here that
          it is a new law.

          Some landlords rent out their properties but retain the garage space.

          Charles Inman/Mt. Wash.
        • rourk_us
          From what I understand it treates renters the same, u pay a certain fee for over 2 cars per house or unit. now if u have 10 people living in one unit w/ 10
          Message 4 of 25 , Sep 1, 2006
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            From what I understand it treates renters the same, u pay a certain
            fee for over 2 cars per house or unit. now if u have 10 people
            living in one unit w/ 10 cars then u woudl probably have to pay for
            8, but then again, mabey 10 people should not be living in a 1
            bedroom. I used to liv ein Claremont which had similiar no parkign
            at night liek S. pas, and it worked very well, and it cut the crime
            down. I have no garage so i would have to get a permit. I do not
            mind walking a bit, but there are some people in my neighborhood who
            slash your tires if u park in front of their house, and now w/ red
            flag days many people park down in my neck of the woods. if we got
            rid of a lot of cars that r just being fixed up and not in use/
            commercial vehicles we would all have more parking.

            --- In nelalist@yahoogroups.com, "chimatli" <chimatli@...> wrote:
            >
            > What about renters and others who have no access to garages or
            > driveways? Should they be forced to give up their cars?
            > And as for the other person who finds it more safe to walk around
            San
            > Francisco at night, I totally disagree. Highland Park and Lincoln
            > Heights are much calmer places (with the exception of the occasional
            > shooting) than the streets of SF.
            > On street cleaning days, I sometimes have to park 2-3 blocks away
            from
            > my house. It's really not a big deal and with the exception of one
            > cranky old homeowner, no one in my neighborhood seems to fret so
            much
            > about the crowded parking situation.
            > -ch
            >
          • iscout
            ... regulate how many cars a person can have or how many people can live in a house?? ... I was going to agree with Joe (and I still do in principle) but
            Message 5 of 25 , Sep 1, 2006
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              --- In nelalist@yahoogroups.com, Joe Walker <joe_walker_2000@...> wrote:
              >
              > Abandoned cars should be cited and towed away...but how does anyone
              regulate how many cars a person can have or how many people can live
              in a house??
              >
              > Joe

              I was going to agree with Joe (and I still do in principle) but
              apparently the City of LA has found a way to impose limits.

              It the "preferential parking" web page for the city of LA it states
              that no more than THREE permits per household can be issued.
              http://www.lacity-parking.org/laopm/permit.htm

              One can also purchase two long term ( 4 months) visitor permits and
              unlimited guest permits but for specific dates only.

              You can't just call four of your friends and invite them for dinner
              unless you have off street parking or you plan ahead to go downtown
              and purchase guest permits for that particular day.

              This might work for West Hollywood where you can walk to City Hall but
              for the city of LA it would be quite onerous.

              In any case, the city will not even consider preferential parking in a
              strictly residential neighborhood like Montecito Heights. It's only
              considered in residential areas that are next to commercial areas to
              balance the need between the two.
              http://www.lacity.org/ladot/tips/parkrest.pdf


              As for the persons who are concerned about their neighbors who are
              plumbers, electricians etc parking their vans or trucks on the street,
              they have to get used to living in a blue collar neighborhood.
              Only trucks longer than 22 feet are prohibited from parking in
              residential neighborhoods (pickups deliveries are OK).
              http://www.lacity.org/ladot/tips/Trucks.pdf

              Twelve years ago I bought two houses in Glassell Park. One next to
              each other. Same square feet. One sold for half the price of the
              other. One had off street parking, the other didn't. Guess which one. :-)


              Marino Pascal
              Glassell Park
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