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Re: [nde] If the Sun does not penetrate the bottom of the oceons how does life live.

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  • valarie Sumner
    Hi from Valerie, I know that I said in one of the paragraphs I wrote implode it should have been explode, corrected now. I only read about life at the bottom
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 1, 2003
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      Hi from Valerie,
       
      I know that I said in one of the paragraphs I wrote "implode" it should have been explode, corrected now. I only read about life at the bottom of the oceon, obviously these creatures have adapted, and also some are blind, or have tiny little eyes, that Scientists say have no vision, because it is dark down there, and they developed excellant sensors. Rather like a Bat.
      Apparently here in Australia, in I think the Desert which one I do not recall, possibly the Simpsom? But anyway there are huge white earthworms there, as thick as a pencil and very long at least 6 feet. Also Giant Centipedes which are deadly poison, the snakes are bad enough here in Oz. I actually have only seen 3 or 4 Brown snakes, and 1 Red Belly Black, and a baby brown snake since arriving in Oz in 1982. But there are meat eating ants here, and one is called an inch Ant, a horror with a terrible bite, this Ant can shoot venom(Hydrochloric Acid) straight into your eyes with a range of at least 10 ft. I have actually saved some of these inch ants when they have nearly drowned, But when they are well, I keep clear of them, they look like something Medievil, spelt that wrong.
      Of course Australia has rotten poisonous creatures here, huge spiders Bird Eating one's, Huntsman spiders, Redbacks these used to sit under toilet seats, and then when an unwary persons Bum hit the seat, they bit it, and hence the unfortunate person popped off(died).  Well I am sure you knew all that.
      I think this World is a beautiful place, and if one is cautious and does not go and interfere with these creatures, one should be OK.
      Has anyone on list any information on LUPUS there are two types. One is called Discus I think, well my friend's Husband has that one, recently diagnosed.
       
      Valerie. 1.12.03


       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, December 01, 2003 2:31 AM
      Subject: Re: [nde] If the Sun does not penetrate the bottom of the oceons how does life live.

      Hi Valarie,

      I was speaking of human life. My response was in
      regards to your message about Stitchen's "The 12th
      Planet." Life at the bottom of the ocean are usually
      bottom feeders that feed off of organic material that
      drifts to the bottom. There are also animals that
      survive through chemical synthesis.

      Russell

      --- valarie Sumner <galleon@...> wrote:
      > Hi from Valerie in Oz.
      >
      > Someone on the list said, there can be no life
      > without the Sun, but that is not strictly true,
      > because many miles down in the oceons are strange
      > fish and other life, which live in darkness, except
      > of r some plants which give of light, as do some
      > fish also have neon lights within their bodies,
      > strange creatures who can never come to the surface,
      > because they would die, implode.
      > So how come they can live with no sunlight, or known
      > oxygen. Well?
      > I have heard that deep down beneath the oceon there
      > are undercurrants that bring oxygen to the deep, and
      > those creatures, some like the sealicamph(I know I
      > have spelt that incorrectly), that particular fish
      > they say is the closest fish in body and shape to
      > mankind, that is the scientific theory, this World
      > is a strange yet beautiful place full of mysteries,
      > and untold creatures, there is also plant life down
      > there, and much plankton even though we are told
      > plankton requires light to exist. Now surely there
      > will be some discussions regarding these facts.
      > But then again, if they had been posed by another
      > member of the group, no doubt much would be said,
      > but a mere idiot woman, perhaps not.
      >
      > Valerie.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >  
      >
      >


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    • Jenny Gersekowski
      Hi Valerie, Yes there are two types of Lupus, Discoid & Systemic. My Mum had a bad case of Systemic (SLE) . She passed away last month from multiple myeloma
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 1, 2003
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        Hi Valerie,

         

        Yes there are two types of Lupus, Discoid & Systemic. My Mum had a bad case of Systemic (SLE) . She passed away last month from multiple myeloma cancer and pneumonia. I had Lupus too but am now in remission but I have Fibromyalgia, which some Lupus patients have. One of the main symptoms of Lupus is a big butterfly rash on one’s face which looks like a butterfly.  There would be plenty of information on the internet about Lupus.

         

        Cheers from Jenny (also in Australia)

         

        P.S. I was bitten by a redback spider some years ago. I suffered from a lot of pain but got over it. Some children can die from the bite though.

         

         

         

        Jenny Gersekowski

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: valarie Sumner [mailto:galleon@...]
        Sent: Monday, 1 December 2003 8:32 PM
        To: nde@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [nde] If the Sun does not penetrate the bottom of the oceons how does life live.

         

        Hi from Valerie,

         

        I know that I said in one of the paragraphs I wrote "implode" it should have been explode, corrected now. I only read about life at the bottom of the oceon, obviously these creatures have adapted, and also some are blind, or have tiny little eyes, that Scientists say have no vision, because it is dark down there, and they developed excellant sensors. Rather like a Bat.

        Apparently here in Australia, in I think the Desert which one I do not recall, possibly the Simpsom? But anyway there are huge white earthworms there, as thick as a pencil and very long at least 6 feet. Also Giant Centipedes which are deadly poison, the snakes are bad enough here in Oz. I actually have only seen 3 or 4 Brown snakes, and 1 Red Belly Black, and a baby brown snake since arriving in Oz in 1982. But there are meat eating ants here, and one is called an inch Ant, a horror with a terrible bite, this Ant can shoot venom(Hydrochloric Acid) straight into your eyes with a range of at least 10 ft. I have actually saved some of these inch ants when they have nearly drowned, But when they are well, I keep clear of them, they look like something Medievil, spelt that wrong.

        Of course Australia has rotten poisonous creatures here, huge spiders Bird Eating one's, Huntsman spiders, Redbacks these used to sit under toilet seats, and then when an unwary persons Bum hit the seat, they bit it, and hence the unfortunate person popped off(died).  Well I am sure you knew all that.

        I think this World is a beautiful place, and if one is cautious and does not go and interfere with these creatures, one should be OK.

        Has anyone on list any information on LUPUS there are two types. One is called Discus I think, well my friend's Husband has that one, recently diagnosed.

         

        Valerie. 1.12.03

         

         

        ----- Original Message -----

        From:
        Russell Rebman

        To: nde@yahoogroups.com

        Sent: Monday, December 01, 2003 2:31 AM

        Subject: Re: [nde] If the Sun does not penetrate the bottom of the oceons how does life live.

         

        Hi Valarie,

        I was speaking of human life. My response was in
        regards to your message about Stitchen's "The 12th
        Planet." Life at the bottom of the ocean are usually
        bottom feeders that feed off of organic material that
        drifts to the bottom. There are also animals that
        survive through chemical synthesis.

        Russell

        --- valarie Sumner <galleon@...> wrote:

        > Hi from Valerie in Oz.
        >
        > Someone on the list said, there can be no life
        > without the Sun, but that is not strictly true,
        > because many miles down in the oceons are strange
        > fish and other life, which live in darkness, except
        > of r some plants which give of light, as do some
        > fish also have neon lights within their bodies,
        > strange creatures who can never come to the surface,
        > because they would die, implode.
        > So how come they can live with no sunlight, or known
        > oxygen. Well?
        > I have heard that deep down beneath the oceon there
        > are undercurrants that bring oxygen to the deep, and
        > those creatures, some like the sealicamph(I know I
        > have spelt that incorrectly), that particular fish
        > they say is the closest fish in body and shape to
        > mankind, that is the scientific theory, this World
        > is a strange yet beautiful place full of mysteries,
        > and untold creatures, there is also plant life down
        > there, and much plankton even though we are told
        > plankton requires light to exist. Now surely there
        > will be some discussions regarding these facts.
        > But then again, if they had been posed by another
        > member of the group, no doubt much would be said,
        > but a mere idiot woman, perhaps not.
        >
        > Valerie.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >  
        >
        >


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      • Russell Rebman
        Hi Patrick, Another factor in this chain of events is once the sun goes out, the foodchain will eventually die out. The last to die out will probably be those
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 1, 2003
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          Hi Patrick,

          Another factor in this chain of events is once the sun
          goes out, the foodchain will eventually die out. The
          last to die out will probably be those at the bottom
          of the ocean. But for a short time, there would be a
          great feast from all the dead fish and mammals that
          will sink to the bottom. Once that food is gone, then
          the bottom feeders die out. The only species that will
          be left alive are those who survive on sulphur using
          chemical synthesis at volcanic vents.

          Excellent response!

          Russell

          --- Home <vtpoet@...> wrote:
          > Hi Valerie,
          >
          > Not to nitpick, but... if one of these deep sea
          > creatures came to the
          > surface, they would not implode but explode, in a
          > manner of speaking.
          > I'm sure you were thinking along the right lines,
          > though.
          >
          > As to there being no life without the Sun, that's a
          > little different
          > than responding to the assertion that there can be
          > no life without
          > sunlight. Life has adapted to life without sunlight.
          > However, if the
          > sun were to vanish, it would probably take only a
          > year or two before
          > the oceans more or less frozen solid--(a lot of
          > stored up heat would
          > have to be released). Beyond that, there would be
          > geologic activity
          > which would maintain a layer of liquid water both at
          > the bottom of the
          > ocean, in places perhaps, and within the crust.
          >
          > However, as the nuclear turmoil (as it is now
          > believed to be) subsided
          > within the earth's core, geologic activity would
          > subside and the earth
          > would become a chunk of ice. No sun. No life. It's
          > interesting to
          > speculate on.
          >
          > Thanks Valerie,
          >
          > :-)
          >
          > Patrick
          >
          > Hi from Valerie in Oz.
          >
          > Someone on the list said, there can be no life
          > without the Sun, but
          > that is not strictly true, because many miles down
          > in the oceons are
          > strange fish and other life, which live in darkness,
          > except of r some
          > plants which give of light, as do some fish also
          > have neon lights
          > within their bodies, strange creatures who can never
          > come to the
          > surface, because they would die, implode. So how
          > come they can live
          > with no sunlight, or known oxygen.
          >
          > Well? I have heard that deep down beneath the oceon
          > there are
          > undercurrants that bring oxygen to the deep, and
          > those creatures, some
          > like the sealicamph(I know I have spelt that
          > incorrectly), that
          > particular fish they say is the closest fish in body
          > and shape to
          > mankind, that is the scientific theory, this World
          > is a strange yet
          > beautiful place full of mysteries, and untold
          > creatures, there is also
          > plant life down there, and much plankton even though
          > we are told
          > plankton requires light to exist. Now surely there
          > will be some
          > discussions regarding these facts. But then again,
          > if they had been
          > posed by another member of the group, no doubt much
          > would be said, but
          > a mere idiot woman, perhaps not.
          >
          > Valerie.
          >
          >
          >


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        • Jim & Becky Payne
          Valarie, very fascinating about the snakes, ants and spiders. I have only heard about the brown snake. Is that red back spider maybe what we call in the states
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 2, 2003
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            Valarie, very fascinating about the snakes, ants and spiders. I have only heard about the brown snake. Is that red back spider maybe what we call in the states a black widow? An hourglass red figure on the back?
            Valarie also I tried to send you an email earlier but it did not go through.
            Would you please contact me at
             
             
            Thanks, Jim Payne
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